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Full text of "Annual reports"

MEDFIELD PUBLIC LIBRARY, MA 




3 1848 00202 0647 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 




Seasons of WLeaJieCcC 



2006 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE TOWN OFFICES 



Photographs courtesy ofDebra Shuman 




356 th Anniversary 



ANNUAL REPORT 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/annualreports2006medf 



IN MEMORIAM 



M. Grant Chambers 

Insurance Advisory Committee 

Dr. LeBaron Carleton "Barry" Colt Jr. 

Warrant Committee, Solid Waste Committee, 
Municipal Planning & Building Committee 

James T. Regan 

Planning Board, Board of Appeals, Housing Authority 

Fredric C. Temple 

Board of Health, Charter Commission, Warrant Committee, Land Acquisition, 
Charter Review Committee, Town Government Study Committee 

Annie (Nan) Rogers 

Elderly Taxation Aid Committee 

Dr. A. Ritchey Stagg 

Board of Health, Board of Health Advisory Committee, 
MHS Football Team Physician 



STATE 






SENATORS AND REPRESENTATIVES 
FOR MEDFIELD 



Senator in General Court 

Norfolk, Bristol, and Plymouth District 

James E. Timilty 

State House Room 518 

Boston, MA 02133 

(617)722-1222 

james.timilty@state.ma.us 

Representative in General Court 

13* Norfolk District, Precinct 1 & 2 

Lida Harkins 

State House Room 343 

Boston, MA 02133 

(617) 722-2883 

Rep.LidaHarkins@hou.state.ma.us 

Representative in General Court 

9th Norfolk District, Precinct 3 & 4 

Richard Ross 

State House Room 237 

Boston, MA 02133 

(617) 722-2305 

Richard.ross@state.ma.us 



Governor's Councillor 

2 nd District 
Kelly A. Timilty 
State House Room 184 
Boston, MA 02133 
(617) 727-2795 



FEDERAL 






U.S. Representative to Congress, 9 th District 

Stephen F. Lynch 

John J. Moakley Federal Courthouse 

Suite 3110 

Boston, MA 02210 

(617)428-2000 

stephen.lynch@mail.house.gov 

United States Senator 

Edward M. Kennedy 
2400 J.F.K. Federal Building 
Boston, MA 02203 
(617)565-3170 
senator@kennedy. senate . gov 

United States Senator 

John F. Kerry 

1 Bowdoin Square, 10 th Floor 

Boston, MA 021 14 

(617)565-8519 

j ohn_kerry@kerry. senate . gov 



FACTS ABOUT MEDFIELD 



Incorporated 


1651 


Population 


12,844 as of December 31, 2006 


County 


Norfolk 


Size 


14.43 square miles 


Miles of Highway 


74.72 


Elevation 


180 feet above sea level at the Town House 


Registered Voters 


8,027 as of December 31, 2006 




Democrats 1,603 




Republicans 1,520 




No Party or Designation 4,854 




Other 50 



Government 



Official Notices 



Board of Selectmen 

Annual Town Election is the last Monday in March 

Open Town Meeting is the last Monday in April 

All Town Board and Commission meetings are posted on the 
Town House bulletin board 



Tax Rate 

Taxes Due 

Town House Hours 

Library Hours 



Transfer Station 
Hours 



12.66 per thousand of assessed valuation (7/01/05-6/30/06) 
12.27 per thousand of assessed valuation (7//0 1/06-6/3 0/07) 

August 1 st , November 1 st , February 1 st , and May 1 st 

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, 8:30 AM to 4:30 PM 
Thursday, 8:30 AM to 7:30 PM 
Friday, 8:30 AM to 1:00 PM 

Monday-Thursday, 10:00 AM to 8:00 PM 
Friday, Saturday, 10:00 AM to 5:00 PM 
Sunday, Closed 



Wednesday, Friday and Saturday, 9 AM to 4 PM 



ELECTED AND APPOINTED OFFICIALS 

2006-2007 



Elected Officials 




Eileen Murphy 


2007 


Moderator 




S. Anthony Burrell 


2007 


Scott F. McDermott 


2007 


Housing Authority 




Town Clerk 




Lisa Donovan 


2007 


Carol A. Mayer 


2009 


Leo J. Surette 


2008 






James T. Regan, deceased 


2008 


Board of Selectmen 




Richard D. Jordan 


2009 


Ann B. Thompson 


2007 


L. Paul Galante, Sr. 


2010 


Paul B. Rhuda 


2008 


Valerie A. Mariani, state appointment 


2011 


Osier L. Peterson 


2009 


Trust Fund Commissioners 




Board of Assessors 




Stephen T. Pelosi 


2007 


R. Edward Beard 


2007 


H. Tracy Mitchell 


2008 


Francis W. Perry 


2008 


Georgia Colivas 


2009 


Bruce J. Beardsley 


2009 










Appointed bv the Board of Selectmen 


School Committee 








Susan L. Ruzzo 


2009 


Fire Chief 




Steven E. Kramer, resigned 


2007 


William A. Kingsbury 


2007 


Timothy J. Bonfatti 


2007 






Carolyn P. Casey 


2007 


Chief of Police 




Susan C. Cotter 


2008 


Robert E. Meaney, Jr. 


2009 


Debra Noschese 


2008 


Sergeants 




Trustees of the Public Library 




John L. Mayer 


2007 


John Bankert 


2008 


John W. Wilhelmi 


2007 


Isabella Parker 


2008 


Ray M. Burton 


2007 


Maura Y. McNicholas 


2009 


Daniel J. Burgess 


2007 


Jane M. Ready 


2009 


Loma C. Fabbo 


2007 


James J. Whalen 


2007 






Robert Luttman 


2007 


Police Officers 




Planning Board 




Larz C. Anderson 


2006 


Keith Diggans 


2007 


Eric Bazigian 


2006 


Wright Dickinson 


2008 


Michelle Bento 


2006 


Elissa G. Franco 


2009 


Robert G. Flaherty 


2006 


George N. Lester 


2010 


Dana P. Friend 


2006 


Stephen J. Browne 


2011 


John D. Geary 


2006 


Timothy P. Sullivan, resigned 


2007 


Stephen H. Grover 


2006 






Richard Kelleher 


2006 


Park and Recreation Commissioners 


Thomas M. LaPlante 


2006 


Thomas A. Caragliano 


2009 


Albert J. Manganello 


2006 


Lisa Louttit 


2008 


Kevin McClay, resigned 


2006 


Stephen Farrar 


2008 


Christine DiNatale 


2006 


JctmP'C f"" T flnrln; rpcirmprl 


?no7 


Andrew D. Clark 


2006 



Town Administrator 




Pound Keeper 




Michael J. Sullivan 


2007 


Jennifer Shaw Gates 


2007 


Treasurer/Collector 




Inspection Department 




Georgia K. Colivas 


2009 


Walter Toitorici, Local Inspector of Bldgs 


2007 






John Mahoney, Asst. Building 


2007 


Superintendent of Public Works 




John J. Foster HI, Asst. Building 


2007 


Kenneth P. Feeney 


2009 


Peter Navis, Gas, Asst. Plumbing 


2007 






John A. Rose, Jr., Plumbing, Asst. Gas 


2007 


Town Accountant 




John F. Fratolillo, Asst. Plumb., Asst. Gas 


2007 


Joy Ricciuto 


2009 


James J. Leonard, wiring inspector 


2007 






Joseph Wallace, Asst. Wiring 


2007 


Town Counsel 




Joseph F. Erskine, Asst. Wiring 


2007 


Mark G. Cerel 


2009 


William F. McCarthy, Asst. wiring 


2007 






Peter Diamond, Asst. wiring 


2007 


Board of Health (3 Years) 




John Mahoney, Asst. Building 


2007 


Marcia Aigler 


2007 






Elizabeth Dorisca 


2007 


Official Greeter of the Town of 




Kathleen Schapira 


2008 


Medfield 




Laura Einbinder, Associate 


2007 


Joseph E. Ryan 


2007 


Melissa Stuart, Associate 


2007 







Cemetery Commissioners (3 years) 

Marshall Chick 2007 

Al Manganello 2008 

Thomas Sweeney 2009 

David Temple, Associate 2007 

Water and Sewer Commissioners (3 years) 

Gary A. Lehmann 2007 

Marc R. Tishler 2008 

Jeremy Marsette 2009 

Neil D. Mackenzie, Assoc. (1 yr) 2007 

Superintendent of Insect Pest Control 

Edward M. Hinkley 2007 

Tree Warden 

Edward M. Hinkley 2007 

Field Driver and Fence Viewer 

Walter Toitorici 2007 

Animal Control Officer 

Jennifer Shaw Gates 2007 

Inspector of Animals 

Jennifer Shaw Gates 2007 



Official Historian of the Town of 
Medfield 

Richard P. DeSorgher 



2007 



Official Keepers of the Town 




Clock 




Marc R. Tishler 


2007 


David P. Maxson 


2007 


Board of Registrars (3 years) 




William H. Dunlea, Jr. 


2007 


Thomas Sweeney, Jr., resigned 


2008 


Roberta A. Kolsti 


2009 



Veterans' Service Officer (3 years) 

G, Marshall Chick 2007 

Sealer of Weights and Measures (3 years) 

Michael J. Clancy 2007 

Measurer of Wood and Bark (3 years) 

Michael J. Clancy 2007 

Public Weigher (3 years) 

Michael J. Clancy 2007 

Constables and Keepers of the 
Lockup 

Eric Bazigian 2007 



Daniel J. Burgess 


2007 


Ray M. Burton, Jr. 


2007 


Robert W. Brady 


2007 


Andrew D. Clark 


2007 


Loma C. Fabbo 


2007 


Robert B. Flaherty 


2007 


Dana P. Friend 


2007 


John T. Garvey 


2007 


John D. Geary 


2007 


John F. Gerlach 


2007 


Stephen H. Grover 


2007 


Richard D. Hurley 


2007 


Richard M. Kelleher 


2007 


George W. Kingsbury 


2007 


Thomas M. LaPlante 


2007 


Albert J. Manganello 


2007 


Kevin McClay 


2007 


William H. Mann 


2007 


John L. Mayer 


2007 


Louise Papadoyiannis 


2007 


Patricia A. Rioux 


2007 


Thomas A. Tabarani 


2007 


Christine DiNatale 


2007 


John W. Wilhelmi 


2007 


Kevin W. Robinson 


2007 


Larz C. Anderson 


2007 


Police Matrons 




Jessie A. Erskine 


2007 


Lorna C. Fabbo 


2007 


Jennifer A. Shaw Gates 


2007 


Mary V. Gillis 


2007 


Elizabeth R. Hinkley 


2007 


Elisabeth T. Mann 


2007 


Louise Papadoyiannis 


2007 


Audra Wilhelmi 


2007 


Patricia A. Rioux 


2007 


Mary L. Solari 


2007 


Sally Wood 


2007 


Renata Walter 


2007 


Sandra Cronin 


2007 


Special Police Officers 




Leo Acerra (Millis) 


2007 


Paul J. Adams (Millis) 


2007 


George Bent (Norfolk) 


2007 


Dale Bickford (Millis) 


2007 


Herbert Burr 


2007 


Ray M. Burton, III 


2007 


Jonathan M. Caroll (Norfolk) 


2007 


Jon Cave (Medfield) 


2007 



Ryan Chartrand (Norfolk) 2007 

Sandra Cronin 2007 

William J. Davis (Norfolk) 2007 
Thomas G. Degnim (Norfolk) 2007 

Robert A. Dixon 2007 

Louis Droste (Norfolk) 2007 

William J. Dwyer (Millis) 2007 

David J. Eberle (Norfolk) 2007 

Leo Either (Norfolk) 2007 

Glen R. Eykel (Norfolk) 2007 

Edgardo Feliciano, Jr. 2007 

Lawrence J. Fleming 2007 

Nathan Fletcher (Norfolk) 2007 

Susan Fornaciari (Norfolk) 2007 

Robert Forsythe (Norfolk) 2007 

Terence Gallagher (Norfolk) 2007 

John Gerlach 2007 

Barry Glassman 2007 

Thomas Hamano 2007 

Timothy Heinz (Norfolk) 2007 

John Holmes (Norfolk) 2007 

David Holt (Norfolk) 2007 

Robert Hoist (Norfolk) 2007 

Richard D. Hurley 2007 
Winslow Karlson III (Norfolk) 2007 

Paul Kearns 2007 

James F. Kilduff 2007 

Stephen Kirchdorfer 2007 

James C. Kozak (Norfolk) 2007 

Robert LaPlante 2007 

James Lopez (Millis) 2007 

Peter Lown (Norfolk) 2007 

Robert Maraggio (Millis) 2007 

Kristofer Maxant (Millis) 2007 

Chris MaClure (Norfolk) 2007 
David R. McConnell (Norfolk) 2007 

Peter McGowan (Millis) 2007 

Nicholas Meleski (Millis) 2007 

Robert Miller (Norfolk) 2007 

Paul J. Murphy (Norfolk) 2007 

Linda Meyers (Millis) 2007 

Robert Nedder 2007 

Peter Opanasets (Millis) 2007 

John Panciaocco 2007 

Frederick Paulette 2007 

Stephen Plympton 2007 

Amanda Prata (Norfolk) 2007 

Thomas Quinn (Millis) 2007 

Kevin Roake (Norfolk) 2007 

Wayne Sallale 2007 



Christina Sena (Norfolk) 


2007 


William H. Mann 


2007 


Viriato Sena (Norfolk) 


2007 


John Nash 


2007 


Robert Shannon (Norfolk) 


2007 


Armando B. Palmieri 


2007 


Paul Smith (Millis) 


2007 


Louise Papadoyiannis 


2007 


Christopher Soffayer (Millis) 


2007 


Frederick Paulette 


2007 


Charles Stone (Norfolk) 


2007 


Patricia A. Rioux 


2007 


Richard Strauss 


2007 


Carl Sheridan 


2007 


Thomas Tabarini 


2007 


Mary L. Solari 


2007 


Domenic Tiberi (Millis) 


2007 


Richard Strauss 


2007 


Eric Van Ness (Norfolk) 


2007 


Thomas E. Tabarini 


2007 


Mark Vendetti 


2007 


Renata Walter 


2007 


Robert P. Vitale 


2007 






James Wells 


2007 


Affordable Housing Committee 




Audra Wilhelmi 


2007 


Bonnie Wren-Burgess 


2007 


Ryan Wilhelmi 


2007 


Charles H. Peck 


2007 


Sally Wood 


2007 


Diane L. Maxson 


2007 






Stephen M. Nolan 


2007 


Emergency Management Agency 




Joseph Zegarelli 


2007 


Ray M. Burton, Director 


2007 


John W. McGeorge 


2007 


Arline F. Berry 


2007 


Dorothy J. Steeves 


2007 


Scott Brooks 


2007 


Jeffrey Hanson 


2007 


Ray M. Burton III 


2007 


Kristine Trierweiler, Ex Officio 


2007 


Jon R. Cave 


2007 


Ann B. Thompson, Ex officio 


2007 


Norma Cronin 


2007 






Sandra Cronin 


2007 


Council on Aging 




Barry Glassman 


2007 


Ann Ciancarelli , resigned 


2006 


Neil I. Grossman 


2007 


RuthNadler 


2007 


Thomas S. Hamano 


2007 


Louis Fellini 


2007 


Paul Kearns 


2007 


Kathleen Kristoff 


2008 


Richard D. Hurley 


2007 


Neil DuRoss 


2009 


Steven Krichdorfer 


2007 


Virginia Whyte 


2009 


Charles A. Morreale 


2007 






John L. Parsons 


2007 


Americans with Disabilities Compliance 


Donald W. Reed 


2007 


Review Committee 




Wayne A. Sallale 


2007 


Kenneth P. Feeney 


2007 


Richard D. Strauss 


2007 


Richard D. Hurley, resigned 


2007 


James Wells 


2007 


Michael J. Sullivan 


2007 


Sally Wood 


2007 


Frederick A. Rogers 


2007 






Tina Cosentino 


2007 


Traffic Supervisors 








Robert W. Brady 


2007 


Board of Appeals on Zoning 




William Fitzpatrick 


2007 


Robert F. Sylvia 


2007 


John T. Garvey 


2007 


Russell J. Hallisey 


2008 


Jennifer A. Gates 


2007 


Stephen M. Nolan 


2009 


John F. Gerlach 


2007 


Charles H. Peck, Assoc (1) 


2007 


Mary V. Gillis 


2007 


Burgess P. Standley, Assoc (1) 


2007 


Elizabeth R. Hinkley 


2007 


Thomas M. Reis, Assoc (1) 


2007 


Richard D. Hurley 


2007 






George W. Kingsbury 


2007 


Medfield Cultural Council 




Robert T. LaPlante 


2007 


William F. Pope 


2007 


Elisabeth T. Mann 


2007 


Martha M. Moon 


2007 



Karen Delio 


2008 






Tobey Reed 


2008 


Representative to Regional Hazardous 


Ron Gustavson 


2008 


Waste Committee 




Ann Marie Sweeney 


2008 


Kenneth P. Feeney 


2007 


Michael Sweeney 


2008 






Lucinda Davis 


2009 


Capital Budget Committee 




Isabella Wood 


2009 


Steve Curran 


2007 


Lee Knowles Howell 


2009 


Donald H. Harding 


2007 


Francis A. Iafolla 


2009 


Osier L. Peterson 


2007 






Kristine Trierweiler 


2007 


Charles River Natural Storage Area 




Timothy P. Sullivan 


2007 


Designees 




Charles Kellner 


2007 


Kenneth P. Feeney 


2007 






Michael J. Sullivan 


2007 


Emergency Medical Services Response 






Committee 




Collective Bargaining Team 




David Binder, M.D. 


2007 


Osier Peterson 


2007 


William A. Kingsbury 


2007 


Robert E. Meaney, Jr. 


2007 


Joan M. Kiessling 


2007 


Michael J. Sullivan 


2007 


Robert E. Meaney, Jr. 


2007 


Mark Fisher 


2007 


Michael J. Sullivan 


2007 


Rachel Brown 


2007 


Ann B. Thompson 


2007 


Kristine Trierweiler 


2007 


Emergency Planning Commission 




Community Gardens Committee 




Kenneth P. Feeney 


2007 


Leonard C. Haigh 


2007 


Edward M. Hinkley 


2007 


David J. Noonan 


2007 


Robert E. Meaney, Jr. 


2007 






William A. Kingsbury 


2007 


Conservation Commission (3 years) 




Michael J. Sullivan 


2007 


Marie Zack Nolan 


2007 


Ann B. Thompson 


2007 


Ralph Parmigiane 


2007 






Deborah Bero 


2008 


Enforcing Officer for Zoning 




Michael Perloff 


2008 


Walter Tortorici 


2007 


Philip J. Bun- 


2008 






Robert Kennedy, Jr. 


2009 


Enterprise Fund Committee 




Bruce Redfield 


2009 


Georgia K. Colivas 


2007 


Robert Aigler, Assoc (i) 


2007 


Kenneth P. Feeney 


2007 






Michael J. Sullivan 


2007 


Constables for Election 




Marc R. Tishler 


2007 


Carol A. Mayer 


2007 


Kristine Trierweiler 


2007 






Joy Ricciuto 


2007 



Contract Compliance Officer 

Michael J. Sullivan 



2007 



Economic Development Commission (3 year) 

Ann B. Thompson 2007 

Paul E. Hinkley 2007 

Joseph Scier 2008 

Patrick Casey 2008 

Paul B. Rhuda 2008 

John T. Harney 2009 

Charles Peck 2009 



Fair Housing Officer 

Michael J. Sullivan 

Geographical Information System 

Robert Kennedy, Jr. 
Sandra H. Frigon 
Gary A. Lehmann 
Raymond P. Moore, resigned 
Marie Zack Nolan 
Michael Perloff 



2007 



2007 
2007 
2007 
2007 
2007 
2007 



10 



Michael J. Sullivan 
Kristine M. Trierweiler 
Carol A. Mayer 

Historical Commission (3 year appt.) 
Maria C. Baler 
Ancelin Wolfe 
Burgess P. Standley 
David F. Temple 
Daniel Bibel 
Jonathan Gray 
Charles Navratil 

Richard P. DeSorgher, Assoc (1 Yr) 
Deborah Gaines, Associate 
David R. Sharff, Associate 
Michael R. Taylor, Associate 
John A. Thompson, Associate 
Clara B. Doub, Associate 
Patricia Iafolla Walsh, Associate 



Historic District Commission (3 Year) 

Michael Taylor 2007 

Barbara Jacobs 2007 

Connie Sweeney 2008 

David R. Sharff 2008 

Burgess P. Standley 2009 

Insurance Advisory Committee 



2007 


Medfield MBTA Advisory Board 




2007 


Designee 




2007 


Michael J. Sullivan 
Medfield State Hospital Reuse 


2007 


2007 


Committee 




2007 


Frank L. Garrison 


2007 


2008 


Paul B. Rhuda 


2007 


2008 


Burgess P. Standley 


2007 


2009 


Martha L. Smick 


2007 


2009 


Leo J. Surette 


2007 


2009 


Ann B. Thompson 


2007 


2007 


John T. Harney 


2007 


2007 


Philip J. Bun- 


2007 


2007 


Thomas Sweeney 


2007 


2007 






2007 


Metropolitan Area Planning Council 


I 


2007 


Paul Rhuda (February) 


2009 


2007 







W. Grant Chambers, deceased 


2007 


Michael J. Sullivan 


2007 


Joseph B. Mc Williams 


2007 


Rachel Brown 


2007 


Kingsbury Pond Committee 




Michael Cronin 


2007 


Armand Janjigian 


2007 


Paul Simpson 


2007 


Michael J. Sullivan 


2007 


John Pratt 


2007 


Sheila Joyce 


2007 


Weston Kolsti 


2007 


Local Auction Permit Agent 




Evelyn Clarke 


2007 



Local Water Resource Management 
Official 

Kenneth P. Feeney 



2007 



Memorial Day Committee 

Donna Dragotakes 2007 

Richard D. Hurley, resigned 2007 

William A. Kingsbury 2007 

Jane M. Lomax 2007 

Albert J. Manganello 2007 

William H. Mann 2007 

Frederick Miller, Jr. 2007 

Ann B. Thompson 2007 

Michelle Doucette 2007 

G. Marshall Chick 2007 

Evelyn Clarke 2007 

Committee to Study Memorials 

Richard P. DeSorgher 2007 

G. Marshall Chick 2007 

Jane M. Lomax 2007 

David F. Temple 2007 

Francis Iafolla 2007 



Municipal Census Supervisor 

Carol A. Mayer 2007 

Municipal Planning and Building 
Committee 

Bruce O. Tobiasson 2007 

Drew C. Adams 2007 

Representatives to Neponset 
Watershed Initiative Committee 

Michael J. Sullivan 2007 



11 







Robin Conners, resigned 


2007 


Open Space Planning Committee 




Carl Mellea 


2007 


Jonathan Bennett 


2007 


Tony Centore 


2007 


Christine M. Hajjar 


2007 






Martha L. Smick 


2007 


Elderly Taxation Aid Committee 




Caroline D. Standley 


2007 


Georgia Colivas 


2007 


Marie Zack Nolan 


2007 


Clara Doub 


2007 






Nan Rogers, deceased 


2007 


Parking Clerk and Hearing Officer 




Michael J. Sullivan 


2007 


Carol A. Mayer 


2007 


Frank Perry 


2007 






Roberta Lynch 


2007 


Right-To-Know Coordinator 








William A. Kingsbury 


2007 


Downtown Study Committee 








Robert Dugan 


2007 


Radio Tower Study Committee 




Brandi Erb 


2007 


David P. Maxson 


2007 


Eric O'Brien 


2007 


Willis H. Peligian 


2007 


Robert MacLeod 


2007 


Paul B. Rhuda 


2007 


Nancy Kelly Lavin 


2007 


Michael J. Sullivan 


2007 


Frank Perry, Alternate 


2007 






Ann Humphrey 


2007 


Safety Committee 




Elyssa Vancura 


2007 


Kenneth P. Feeney 


2007 






Michael J. Sullivan 


2007 


Cable TV Contract Negotiating C 


ommittee 






Clara B. Doub 


2007 


Solid Waste Study Committee 




Raymond P. Moore, resigned 


2007 


Kenneth P. Feeney 


2007 


Jack McNicholas 


2007 


Kristine Trierweiler 


2007 


Alfred Brisard, resigned 


2007 


Ann B. Thompson 


2007 


Richard Boucher 


2007 


Scott Colwell 


2007 






John T. Harney 


2007 


Committee to Evaluate Senior Tax Work 


Anthony Centore 


2007 


Off Program 




Carl Mellea 


2007 


Ralph Parmigiane 


2007 






Burgess P. Standley 


2007 


Technology Study Committee 




Theresa Cos 


2007 


Richard Boucher 


2007 


Philip J. Bun- 


2007 


Alan Joffe 


2007 


Roberta Lynch 


2007 


Gary Lehmann 


2007 






Raymond Moore, resigned 


2007 


Feasibility Study Committee of a ' 


rown 


Michael J. Sullivan 


2007 


Owned/Operated Community Center Field 


Kristine Trierweiler 


2007 


House 




Ron Gustavson 


2007 


Gregory Reid 


2007 


Robert Luttman 


2007 


Thomas Woodhouse 


2007 



Three Rivers Interlocal Council (MAPC) 

Kristine Trierweiler 2007 

Adult Community Center Study 
Committee 

Louis Fellini 2007 

Robert Luttman 2007 

Vincent Lavallee 2007 



James Clark 2007 

Thomas Weyl 2007 

Robert Donald 2007 

Brian Hurley 2007 

William Cotter 2007 

Diane Kelley 2007 

Kathryn Boole 2007 



12 



Police Chief Search Committee 








Rachel Brown 


2006 


Permanent School Building and 




Chief William Chase 


2006 


Planning Committee 




Chief Mann 


2006 


David Binder 


2007 


Scott McDermott 


2006 


C. Richard McCullough 


2007 


Karen Naughton 


2006 


Keith Mozer 


2007 


Robert Wood 


2006 


Timothy J. Bonfatti 


2007 


Kristine Trierweiler 


2006 


Susan C. Cotter 


2007 


Appointed bv the Treasurer/Collector 







Clara DeVasto 2007 

Meline Karapetian 2007 

Diane Adair 2007 



Appointed bv the Town Moderator, 
Chairman of the Board of Selectmen, and 
Chairman of the Warrant Committee 



Appointed bv the Chairman of the 




Personnel Board 




Selectmen, Chairman of the School 




Rachel Brown 


2007 


Committee and the Town Moderator 


Christine Connelly 


2007 






Susan Richard, resigned 


2007 


Vocational School Committee 




Debra Shuman 


2008 


Representative 




Rev. Robert Wood, Associate 


2007 


Karl D. Lord June 30, 2007 










Appointed bv the Planning Board 




Appointed bv the Fire Chief 








Charles G. Seavey, Deputy 


2007 


Long Range Planning Committee 




Thomas Seeley, Captain 


2007 


Robert F. Tormey, Jr. 


2007 


Thomas M. LaPlante, Jr., Lt 


2007 


Peter J. Fellman 


2007 


Richard M. Rogers, Lt 


2007 


Margaret H. Gryska 


2007 


David C. O'Toole, Lt 


2007 


Burgess P. Standley 


2007 






Keith R. Diggans 


2007 


Appointed bv the Board of Health 








William R. Domey, P.E. 


2007 


Sign Advisory Board 




Mark Oram 


2007 


Alfred J. Bonoldi 


2007 


Nancy Bennotti 


2007 


Jeffrey Hyman 


2007 






Thomas D. Erb 


2007 


Appointed bv the Moderator 




Thomas J. Roy croft 


2007 






J. Matthew McCormick 


2007 


Deputy Moderator 








Conrad J. Bletzer 


2007 






Warrant Committee 








Mary Wilson 


2007 






James Shannon 


2007 






Richard E. Gordet 


2008 






Stephen S. Curran, resigned 


2008 






Joanne Bragg 


2008 






William Johnson 


2009 






Robert Morrill 


2009 






Randy Rogers 


2009 






Mark Fisher 


2009 






Stephen Pelosi 


2009 







13 



MEETING SCHEDULE 



Name 


Day 


Time 


Location 


Annual Town Election 


Last Monday in March 


6:00 AM to 8:00 PM 


Wheelock School 


Annual Town Meeting 


Last Monday in April 


7:30 PM 


High School 


Appeals Board 


Wednesday as needed 


7:30 PM 


Town House 


Board of Assessors 


1 st Thursday 


6:00 PM 


Town House 


Board of Health 


1 st and 3 rd Wednesday 


6:30 PM 


Town House 


Cultural Council 


Biannually 


8:00 PM 


Town House 


Conservation 


1 st and 3 rd Thursday 


7:30 PM 


Town House 


Historical Commission 


3 rd Wednesday 


8:00 PM 


Town House 


Housing Authority 


2 nd Wednesday 


6:30 PM 


Tilden Village 


Library Trustees 


2 nd Tuesday 


7:30 PM 


Library 


MEMA 


1 st Tuesday 


7:00 PM 


Medfleld State 


Park and Recreation 


2 nd and 4 th Tuesday 


7:30 PM 


Pfaff Center 


Planning Board 


Mondays 


8:00 PM 


Town House 


School Committee 


1 st and 3 rd Mon 


7:30 PM 


High School 




Monthly (July- August) 


7:30 PM 


High School 


Selectmen 


Tuesdays 


7:00 PM 


Town House 


Warrant Committee 


Tuesdays (Nov.-May) 


7:30 PM 


Town House 


Water and Sewer 


1 st and 3 rd Thursday 


7:00 PM 


Town House 



14 



DEPARTMENT REPORTS 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING 

DECEMBER 31, 2006 



15 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



To the Residents of Medfield: 

The Board reorganized for the ensuing year in March. Ms. Ann B. Thompson was 
elected Chairman and Mr. Paul B. Rhuda was elected clerk. Mr. Osier L. Peterson 
who was re-elected by the Townspeople, was the third member of the Board. 

Personnel Developments 

In May, 2006 Chief Richard Hurley retired from the Medfield Police Department after 
sixteen years of dedicated service, Before coming to Medfield Chief Hurley served 
twenty years with the Town of Westwood. In total his service in law enforcement was 
thirty six years. The Board of Selectmen would like to thank Chief Richard Hurley for 
his tireless dedication and service to the Town of Medfield. We wish Chief Hurley 
health and happiness in his retirement. 

The Board of Selectmen would like to thank the seven members of the Police Chief 
Search Committee for their time and dedication in the Police Chief Search and 
Selection Process. The Committee began the process in August of 2005 and in April of 
2006, the Board of Selectmen appointed Robert E. Meaney as the new Medfield Police 
Chief. The Board of Selectmen would like to thank all the Town Departments, 
Personnel Board and Chief Richard Hurley for a successful transition between Police 
Chiefs. 



Medfield State Hospital 

Once again the Board of Selectmen would like to report that they continue to work 
with the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to identify a redevelopment plan for the 
Medfield State Hospital Campus. This past year the Board of Selectmen reached a 
tentative agreement with the Division of Capital Asset Management for a 
redevelopment plan that included 440 units of housing including senior housing, 
condominiums, apartments and some single family homes. The number and type of 
housing would allow the Town to meet the obligation of 10% affordable housing 
under Chapter 40B. Legislation was filed and the Board of Selectmen expected it to 
more forward with a Special Town Meeting by the end of the year. Approximately two 
weeks prior to the end of the legislative session in June, a State Representative who 
does not represent the Town of Medfield reopened the negotiations forcing the Town 
to accept additional units of a different type. The Board of Selectmen was forced to 
accept the terms of the new agreement, however, the Legislature failed to act on the 
amended special legislation. Legislation was filed again in early December by 
Representative Lida Harkins and the Town is awaiting action by the Legislature. If 
and when the Town is able to reach agreement with the Commonwealth, the Town 
will hold a Special Town Meeting to enact a zoning change that will allow for the 
redevelopment of the Medfield State Hospital Campus. 



16 



Downtown Study Committee 

The Downtown Study Committee presented a plan to the Board of Selectmen in the 
Spring. The plan was prepared by the land use planning firm, Community Preservation 
Associates, to assist in developing a "vision plan for the downtown." This downtown 
plan will be used to leverage funding including grants for downtown improvements. 
The Committee worked extensively holding public hearings and gathering information 
for the vision plan. The Committee will work to seek additional funding for the 
recommendations. The Board of Selectmen would like to thank the Committee for its 
commitment to the downtown. 

Capital Projects 

The Board of Selectmen are pleased to report that construction of the Adult 
Community Center is underway. The Board of Selectmen would like to thank the 
Department of Public Works which has been instrumental in getting this project 
started. The DPW installed the necessary drainage, ran the utility conduits, excavated 
trenches and completed the construction of the roadway all of which was necessary 
before construction of the building could begin. The building is projected to be 
completed in the summer of 2007. 

The Board of Selectmen would like to thank the employees of the Town, the residents 
of Medfield and the countless volunteers and committee members that contribute 
everyday to the workings of town government and assist the Board of Selectmen in 
doing our job. We encourage all the citizens of the town to participate in town 
government by volunteering, attend meetings and to vote at town elections. It is these 
generous contributions that will assure Medfield continues to be the desirable 
community in which to live now and in the future. 



Respectfully Submitted, 

Ann B. Thompson, Chairman 
Paul B. Rhuda, Clerk 
Osier L. Peterson 



17 



PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit my 25th Annual Report for the Public Works Department. 

ICE HOUSE ROAD/ADULT COMMUNITY CENTER 

The Highway Department installed drainage, which included the removal and relocation 
of seven catch basins. We also installed 3900 feet of electric, telephone and cable 
conduit. The Highway Department excavated 1400 feet of trench for the Gas Company. 
The road needed a cul-de-sac to be constructed. The Highway Department built the road 
to grade, paved with base hot top, at which time we installed 2000 feet of granite curbing. 
The Water Department relocated 100 feet of 12" water main. 

STREET DEPARTMENT 

The Highway Department continued maintenance of existing sidewalks by overlaying 
sidewalks with hot top on Adams Street, South Street, Grist Mill, Elm Street, Miller 
Street, Pleasant Street and Marlyn Road. 

The Highway Department also extended the existing drainage on Pleasant Street by 
installing two catch basins and 250 feet of 12" plastic pipe. 

On Noon Hill we installed drainage and removed and relocated two 12" culverts and 
installed catch basins. 

Snow: Total snowfall for the year was 43 inches. The Public Works Department had a 
total of 33 call outs and 1 1 related to storm conditions. 

State Aid: The Highway Department completed the remaining section of South Street 
from the Railroad Crossing to Route 27. Completed the planting of trees and the 
overlaying of the sidewalk and hot top on South Street for a distance of 1600 feet. 

Transfer Station: The Medfield Highway Department trucked 3,723 tons of rubbish to 
the Millbury incinerator. 

The Town collected $9,887.84 in revenue from local businesses for non-recyclable trash 
taken to the Transfer Station. 

Approximately 21.86 tons of CRTs were collected at the Special Collection Days that 
were held in April and October. 



18 



The Town held a combined Household Hazardous Waste Day with the Town of Dover. 
Approximately 299 cars dropped off miscellaneous household waste. 

The Mercury collection program is ongoing at the Public Works Department at Town 
Hall. Residents are encouraged to drop off items containing mercury, e.g. thermometers, 
thermostats and florescent bulbs. 



Recycling^ 


Glass 


50.26 tons 




Cans 


22.07 tons 




Plastic 


48.01 tons 




Light Metals 


70.08 tons 




Newsprint/Cardboard 


689 tons 




Grass/Leaves/Brush 


599 tons 



Revenue received from deposit cans and bottles: $1,908.00 

CEMETERY DEPARTMENT 

The Cemetery Department continued their weekly maintenance program of the cemetery 
grounds. This included pruning of trees, mowing of grass, placing of loam and seed, 
extensive slice seeding and loaming in the distressed areas of the cemetery. Repaired 
gravestones that were vandalized along Route 109. Continue with our annual spring and 
fall cleanup. The design of section "J" on the Bridge Street end of the cemetery was 
completed with the help of the Norfolk County Engineers. 
There were 56 interments and 62 burial plots sold during the year 2006. 

SCHOOLS 

The Highway Department built a handi-cap ramp at the Wheelock School and overlayed 
the sidewalk between Dale Street School and Memorial School. 

WATER DEPARTMENT 

The Medfield Water Department installed 10 new services, replaced three hydrants and 
four service leaks were repaired. There were 1 1 water main breaks. 

The ongoing meter replacement program and conversion to radio read meters continued 
in 2006 with 867 new meters installed. The new radio read meters will increase the 
efficiency of billing. Call the office to set up an appointment for meter replacement at 
508 359-8505 x 601 or 609. We hope to send out bills four times a year under the new 
system. 

The Medfield Water Department along with a number of surrounding towns has formally 
protested the new Water Management Act imposed by the state. The new restrictions if 
enacted will restrict use of water and raise water rates. 



19 



The Town of Medfield pumped 479,014,700 gallons of water in 2006. 

Flushing Program: The water department continues to flush the water system twice a 
year in an effort to ensure quality water. 

SEWER DEPARTMENT 

In 2006 the Wastewater Treatment Plant treated 456,831,300 gallons of sewerage from 
homes and various businesses in town. The State Hospital discharged 6,675,290 gallons 
of sewerage. 287,550 gallons of septic from private systems was treated. The combined 
effluent was discharged to the Charles River with a better than 98% removal of 
impurities. 1,744,000 gallons of sludge was shipped to Woonsocket, Rhode Island for 
incineration. 

WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT 

We would like to welcome new employee, Howard Asnes to the Treatment Plant. 
There were 10 eighth grade tours of the Treatment Plant. 
There were 44 new sewer hookups in 2006. 

In conclusion, I wish to express appreciation to Administrative Assistants Claire O'Neil 
of the Highway Department and Mary Luciano and Kathy Berteletti of the Water and 
Sewer Department. Appreciation is also given to Robert Kennedy, Street Department 
Foreman, Edward Hinkley, Water and Sewer Foreman and Peter Iafolla, Chief Operator 
of the Wastewater Treatment Plant as well as all the men of the various departments who 
are to be commended for their continuous conscientious public service. 



Respectfully submitted. 

Kenneth P. Feeney 
Superintendent of Public Works 



20 



BOARD OF WATER AND SEWERAGE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Town continued to respond to the water conservation signs keeping the consumption 
within the goals of the program. Well 6 is in use while Well 3 is pumped with reduced 
capacity. The Town has ample water pumping capacity and wells 1, 2 and 4 are standby. 

In December 2004 the State Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) issued a draft 
copy of restrictions to the State Pumping Permit that needs to be renewed every 5 years. If 
fully implemented it would limit withdrawal of water to 65 gallons per person per 
household. Particularly, the pumping levels were severely reduced for Well 6 our most 
important well. It has by far the largest capacity and excellent water quality. These new 
restrictions would severely impact quality of life and cost of living in our town. 

Several reports and comments by consulting Hydrologists and the New England Water 
Works Association question the scientific justification of these restrictions. They disagree 
with a wholesale withdrawal limit to solve the alleged stream flow reduction and 
recommend a more flexible, holistic approach. 

A final version of the DEP pumping permits was to be issued in December 2006. As of the 
end of January 2007, it has not been published. We are continuing to rigorously oppose 
the articles of the draft regulations. Together with our neighboring communities that also 
draw water from the Charles River aquifer we will take all possible action to prevent the 
new regulation in its present form from taking effect. 

The yearly update to the Storm Water Management Plan has been submitted, as required. 

Repair of the old sewer pipes continues on a yearly basis to further reduce the 
inflow/infiltration of storm water into the sewer system. Due to the recent installation of 
new sewer lines the subsurface is settling. This affected a number of adjacent cast iron 
water lines that developed leaks and needed to be repaired. 

As probably the last sewer line installation, Hatters Hill Road has been completed and 
betterments were issued to abuttants. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Marc Tishler, Chairman 
Jeremy Marsette 
Gary A. Lehmann 
Neil Mackenzie 



21 



PLANNING BOARD 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

In 2006, the Planning Board reviewed one new preliminary subdivision plan and 
approved two definitive subdivision plans, each with three lots. 

The Board released five lots in the previously approved Shining Valley Farm 
Subdivision, two lots in the newly approved Hamant Farm Subdivision, and three 
lots in the also newly approved Cole Drive Extension Subdivision, thus, allowing 
them to be sold. 

"Approval-not-required" plans are those plans necessary to create new lots along 
existing ways, or change lot lines on existing lots, but the plans do not rise to the 
level of a full subdivision approval process. In 2006, the Board endorsed eight 
such plans, creating four new lots and redefining five lot lines. 

The Board approved one Site Plan for the Adult Community Center on Ice House 
Road in the Town owned "30 Acre Subdivision." 

The Planning Board also held three Scenic Road hearings for stone walls along 
North Street, School Street, and Pine Street. 

SIGN ADVISORY BOARD 

Under Section 13 of the Town of Medfield Zoning Bylaw the Sign Advisory Board 
reviews sign applications for their compliance with the Bylaw . The Advisory 
Board also assists applicants in understanding the Sign Bylaw and works with them 
to obtain results in keeping with the character of the Town. In addition Sign 
Advisory Board members make recommendations to the Planning Board for 
changes in the Bylaw . The Board is comprised of both local business people and 
residents. The Planning Board would like to thank the Sign Advisory Board for all 
its diligent work. 

OTHER BUSINESS 

The Board continued to work with the Board of Selectmen, the State Department 
of Capital Asset Management, and the town's consultant regarding zoning 
opportunities as they may apply to the disposition of the former Medfield State 
Hospital site. 

Earth Tech, Inc. continued to provide the engineering services for subdivision 
review and street construction inspections. 



22 



The Planning Board acknowledges with thanks the cooperation and assistance of 
the Town Boards and Departments with special thanks to: Superintendent of Public 
Works Kenneth P. Feeney; Tree Warden Edward Hinkley; and Town Counsel 
Mark G. Cerel. 

Planning Board meetings are generally held on Monday evenings at 8:00 P.M. at 
the Town House. These meetings are open to the public. Appointments with the 
Board must be made by the Thursday noon prior to the meeting. Requests for 
information or appointments should be directed to the Planning Board 
Administrator, Norma Cronin, at the Town House, 508-359-8505, ext. 645. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Wright C. Dickinson, Chairman 
Elissa G. Franco, Vice-Chairman 
George N. Lester, Secretary 
Keith Diggans, Member 
Stephen J. Browne, Member 



23 



BOARD OF APPEALS ON ZONING 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

During 2006 the Board of Appeals acted on twenty-three applications as follows: 

GRANTED: One Special Permit for a food establishment and associated parking 
One Special Permit to allow the expansion of an existing restaurant 
Eleven findings that proposed additions will not intensify the existing 
nonconformity or, in the alternative, will not be detrimental to the neighborhood 
One Special Permit to allow a family apartment 
One Special Permit for the Medfield Adult Community Center 
One Special Permit to allow a swimming pool to be located within a lesser 
setback 

Two Variances for frontage 

One extension of a decision to allow a residential addition 

One special permit to allow a gas station with service station, car wash and 
convenience store 

One amendment to a Special Permit for an Industrial Site Plan 
One Comprehensive Permit (see below) 

DENIED: One request for a variance from Section 6.2 Table of Area Regulations 

The Board also made one determination that a caretaker apartment within a horse 
barn is an agricultural use, and, as such, is permitted by right under M.G.L. 
Chapter 40A, Section 3. 

A large portion of the Board's work this year centered on the Comprehensive 
Permit (Chapter 40B), Affordable Housing application submitted in October 2005. 
Following eleven continuances which included six sessions, the Board approved 
the project with conditions on December 13, 2006 for 36 townhouse condominium 
units, nine of which would be considered affordable, for property on West Street. 

The Board would also like to express its sincere thanks for all the support and 
consideration it has received this past year from the Town Boards and the residents 
of the Town of Medfield. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Robert F. Sylvia, Chairman 
Stephen M. Nolan, Member 
Russell J. Hallisey, Member 
Charles H. Peck, Associate 
Thomas M. Reis, Associate 
Burgess P. Standley, Clerk 

24 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Massachusetts Department of Revenue in December, 2006 approved the values 
set out in the Assessors' required triennial certification report, resulting in a municipal 
tax rate of $12.27/$ 1,000 for fiscal year 2007. The town tax levy commitment, which 
is primarily the result of monies appropriated at Town Meeting, was $29,706,074, 
amounting to a $1,359,396, or 4.93% increase over last year's commitment of 
$28,346,678. Tax bills were timely mailed in December, 2006 for third quarter tax 
payments. Increases in assessed values of single-family homes in Medfield averaged 
8%, and condominiums' average values increased 4.5% ovsr the prior year's 
assessments. Total valuations for the town in fiscal year 2007 rose to $2,421,032,930 
from $2,239,074,100 in fiscal year 2006. 

Massachusetts law requires, as a prerequisite to setting a tax rate, that every third year 
cities and towns submit and have approved by the Department of Revenue a triennial 
recertification plan; this process requires development and completion of an intricate 
townwide property revaluation. Complicating Medfield' s recertification this year was 
the Bureau of Local Assessment's establishing more rigorous valuation standards 
statewide, and its challenging valuations of state-owned land (which relate to the 
amount of state reimbursement set out on the cherry sheet, so-called). Deputy 
Assessor Stan Bergeron worked tirelessly and patiently to obtain state approval in time 
for tax bills to be mailed out by December 31, with an established actual tax rate, 
resulting in Medfield's saving tens of thousands of dollars in revenue; many cities and 
towns, including those not having to run the gauntlet of triennial recertification this 
year, did not meet the deadline. The Board thanks Stan for his determined efforts to 
complete the task in time, with the assistance of his staff Donna O'Neill and Kathy 
Mills. Taxpayers may access online via the Town of Medfield website 
(town.medfield.net) the new townwide property values, other descriptive property 
information, and forms. 

All of us in the Assessors office sadly note the untimely passing in December of 
Eugene Swezey, who for many years assisted us with our work through gathering and 
organizing needed information, in the field and in the office. Gene was a gentleman, a 
kind man loved by all who knew him; an author, photographer, and genealogist, his 
cheery outlook and interesting stories uplifted the spirits of all of those around him. 
We will miss him. We extend deepest sympathies to his wife Alice and family. 

In March, 2006, Bruce J. Beardsley was elected to another three- year term on the 
Board of Assessors. 



25 



The Board this year continued to encourage the Board of Selectmen to promote the 
senior tax work off program, an arrangement which mutually benefits Medfield's 
senior citizens and its town government; also in the town's interest, the Board 
continues to recommend each year Town Meeting's adoption of legislation affording 
tax relief to qualifying senior citizens and veterans. 



Respectfully submitted, 



R. Edward Beard, Chairman 
Bruce J. Beardsley, Clerk 
Francis J. Perry, III, Third Member 



26 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit my first annual report as Chief of the Medfield Police Department for 
the year ending December 31, 2006. 

The most significant event of the year was the retirement of Chief Richard Hurley in 
May after 16 years of dedicated service to the Medfield Police Department and the 
community. His service to law enforcement totals 36 years, including 20 years with the 
Westwood Police Department. His tenure saw the department computerized, 
renovations to the building in the early 90' s, community policing initiatives instituted 
and the hiring and promotion of the majority of the current staff. Chief Hurley will still 
be seen working the streets of Medfield directing traffic at various locations. 

In July, Officer Kevin McClay transferred to the Norwood Police Department after 
serving with the Medfield Police Department for three years. Feedback indicates that he 
is serving Norwood with the same enthusiasm that he displayed in Medfield. Everyone 
wishes him well in his new department. 

Shortly after my arrival in May and extending through November, the department 
experienced a series of criminal events and vehicle crashes that challenged the skills of 
the department. I am pleased to report that Chief Hurley left me a dedicated and 
resourceful group of individuals who demonstrated the ability to work with great 
competence under a variety of circumstances. 

In December the Medfield Police Department received a grant from the Metro West 
Health Care Foundation that totaled $15,450.00. This grant will allow the department to 
purchase a sufficient number of AEDs (automated external defibrillators) to equip the 
police cruisers and the police station. These devices are used to provide emergency care 
for victims experiencing sudden cardiac arrest. 

Also in December, a work crew of six inmates spent two weeks at the police station 
cleaning, painting and organizing. The inmates and a correctional officer are provided 
to the town at no cost, except for providing lunch, under a program administered by 
Sheriff Michael Bellotti of the Norfolk County Sheriffs Office. 

Finally, I would like to express my sincere appreciation to the numerous town personnel 
and community members who have assisted in my transition to this position. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Chief Robert E. Meaney 



27 



This is a summary of the calls for service in 2006 that the Police Department handled. 

Aggravated Assault 10 

Annoying calls 155 

Arrests 96 

Arson 2 

Assists 436 

Bad Checks 2 

Breaking and Entering 22 

Burglar Alarms 225 

Bylaw Violations 2 

Disorderly persons 3 

Disturbances 62 

Drug Violations 16 

Drunkenness 2 

Fire Alarms 166 

Indecent Assault 

Forgery 7 

Homicides 

Juvenile Offenses 3 

Larceny 48 

Liquor Law Violations 14 

Malicious destruction 75 

Manslaughter 2 

Medical assists 24 

Miscellaneous calls 744 

Mischief 123 

Missing Persons 16 

Missing Persons Found 1 6 

Motor Vehicle Accidents 301 

Motor Vehicle Citations 1 1 96 

Motor Vehicle Thefts 5 

Operating under the influence 14 

Parking Tickets 186 

Protective Custody 8 

Restraining Orders 23 

Robbery 2 

Runaway 

Simple Assault 14 

Shoplifting 2 

Threats 15 

Trespass 6 

Vandalism 126 

Weapons Violations 1 



28 



MEDFIELD EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit the annual report for the Medfield Emergency Management Agency for 
the year ending December 31, 2006. 

The Medfield Emergency Management Agency provides coordination between the 
Selectmen, Town Departments, the Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency 
and the Federal Emergency Management. 

The Medfield Emergency Management Agency is divided in f o two sections. One 
section, the Management Group contains amateur radio operators, a transport section 
and shelter management people. The second section contains the auxiliary police 
officers. Both groups are under the control of the Emergency Management Agency 
Director who reports to the Chief of Police on auxiliary police matters and the Town 
Administrator on emergency management issues. 

The management group maintains backup communications systems, provides 
transportation to and runs shelter operations in case of emergencies where people need 
temporary shelter due to power outages or other such storm damage. The auxiliary 
police unit provides additional manpower to the police department during emergencies 
and large events such as parades and other public gatherings. As in past years both 
groups combined to donate over 1,000 man-hours of community service to the Town. 

I would like to thank the men and women of the department for their continued support 
and contributions throughout the year. Also I wish to thank the Board of Selectmen, 
Michael Sullivan, his staff and the Medfield Police Department for their assistance and 
support. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Ray M. Burton Jr. 
Director 



29 



ANIMAL CONTROL OFFICER 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

This report reflects my duties as Animal Control Officer and Animal Inspector from 
January 1 through December 31, 2006. 

Total animal control calls 1,648 

Total animal control incidents 741 

(Incidents include searching for dogs running loose and helping people 
with animal related problems not listed below) 

Calls for dogs running loose/some returned to their owners 167 

Number of citations issued 73 



Barking dogs complaints 

Total calls related to bats in homes or human and pet exposures 

Total calls for squirrels in resident's homes 
Total number of dead birds picked up by Animal Control due to 
West Nile 



33 
31 
21 
51 



Animals hit by cars: 

Cats 

Dogs 

Deer 

Other (raccoons, skunks, rabbits, squirrels, woodchucks) 
Total number of animals hit by cars 



15 
10 
44 
33 
102 



Sick or injured wildlife that had to be euthanized 

Raccoons 

Deer 

Skunk 

Other(bats, opossums, birds, etc) 
Total number of wildlife that had to be euthanized 

Medfield Strays adopted: 

Number of cats adopted 
Number of kittens adopted 
Number of dogs adopted 
Number of rabbits adopted 
Number of guinea pigs adopted 



2 

4 

2 

11 

19 



23 

22 

6 

4 

5 



30 



There were nine dog bites and two cat bites, each requiring a minimum 10-day 
quarantine. 

All barns and livestock have been inspected and pass the requirements of the Town of 
Medfield and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. All of the animals and barns are in 
the best of condition. 

The following animals were counted in Medfield in 2005: 

Beef cows 4 

Donkeys 4 

Llamas 3 

Goats 4 

Horses 96 

Ponies 4 

Mini horses 3 

Poultry 58 

Sheep 34 

I appreciate the continuing support and cooperation of the Town of Medfield, the 
Medfield Police Department, Heritage Hill Veterinary Clinic, Main Street Veterinary 
Hospital, Medfield Veterinary Clinic and Norfolk County Veterinary Clinic. Thank you 
to my current Assistant Animal Control Officers, Danielle Landry and Lori Sallee for 
their dedication on the weekends. I also want to thank the Medfield residents for their 
ongoing donations and support of the stray animals at the Medfield Animal Shelter. 
Without all of you, we could not have saved the cats, kittens, dogs and small animals that 
were adopted this year from the animal shelter. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Jennifer Shaw Gates 
Animal Control Officer 
Animal Inspector 



31 



MEDFIELD 
FIRE -RESCUE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit my Annual Report as Chief of the Fire Department for the year ending 
December 31, 2006. 

Department personnel responded to over 1000 calls in 2006, of those 593 were for 
Emergency Medical Services This year marks the second year in a row that we have 
had no major fires resulting in significant property loss. Although we had no major 
fire losses we remain busy answering a variety of requests for assistance. 

In April, I wrote a grant request to the Federal Assistance to Firefighters Grant 
Program seeking $120,000.00 to replace all twenty- four of our Self-Contained 
Breathing Apparatus (SCBA) and add some Rapid Intervention equipment. Our 
current SCBA is approaching twenty years old, and while it is properly maintained, 
the units are subject to more frequent repair. On December 1, we were notified that 
our grant request was approved. The equipment has been ordered and we expect 
delivery and training after the first of the year. These new up-to-date SCBA's will 
have integrated safety devices to locate a downed or trapped firefighter, the ability to 
buddy breath in an emergency, as well as heads up displays in the facepiece that 
indicates the level of air in the tank. This new equipment will enhance the health and 
safety of all our firefighters working at the scene of a fire or hazardous material 
incident. 

At the Annual Town Meeting voters unanimously approved $375,000 to purchase a 
new Pumper. This new piece will replace the existing Engine 1 which is thirty years 
old. Our expected delivery date is the Spring of next year. The rest of our equipment is 
in good shape. At the next Annual Town Meeting the Police Chief and I will be 
seeking funds to study the needs of the Fire & Police with regards to a new Public 
Safety Facility. Our departments have outgrown the present facility. This was evident 
when the new apparatus we just purchased had to be specially designed & built to fit 
into the present station. It should be noted the Fire Station was constructed in 1960 
with the Police Station added in 1976. 

In the Fall of 05 we began the upgrade of our municipal fire alarm system from an 
overhead wire system to a wireless radio based system. This state of the art system 
will enable us to remove the wire system which was starting to require a lot of 
maintenance. The wireless system makes adding new accounts much easier. As of the 
end of the year we are 98% complete with this changeover. We expect to start 
removing the overhead wire in the Spring of 07. 



32 



Although new construction has slowed down, we have been kept busy with the 
conversion of the Tofias property to the Montrose School as well as a existing homes 
being remodeled. The Adult Community Center has also broken ground; we will be 
monitoring that project next year. Also planned are a 44 unit housing complex and a 
new gas station/ convenience store/ car wash. These projects will also require the 
monitoring of their construction. 

A new law, known as Nicole's Law, was made effective on March 31. This law 
requires that every residential structure that has fossil fuel burning equipment be 
equipped with Carbon Monoxide Alarm Protection. The law requires a detector on all 
habitable levels of your home and within 10' of every bedroom. This new law is 
enforced on all new construction, renovations, utility upgrades and when homes are 
sold. Take the time to properly equip your home to comply with the law and make it 
safe for your family. 

We have been notified that we will no longer have the services of Caritas Norwood 
Hospital Paramedic intercept services after the first of the year. They have determined 
that it is no longer financially feasible to offer this service. We currently have the 
services of American Medical Response (AMR) to assist us in our advanced life 
support (ALS) needs. We will be looking at what other options we might have to 
advance our ambulance service to the ALS level. 

I wish to thank all the members of the department for their continued dedication and 
commitment to making our community a safer place to live. 



Respectfully submitted, 

William A. Kingsbury 
Fire Chief 



33 



SERVICES RENDERED FOR THE YEAR ENDING 
DECEMBER 31, 2006 



AMBULANCE 

Total Calls 593 



Transports To: 


Metrowest Natick 


113 


Caritas Norwood 


278 




Metrowest Framingham 


11 


Newton Wellesley 


20 




Deaconess Glover 


45 


Mass General 


1 




Brigham and Women's 


1 


Children's Hospital 


1 




Other: V/A 


2 


Beth Israel 


1 




Milford Hospital 


4 







Advanced Life Support 



Departmental ALS: 


140 


ALS Intercepts: 174 




Other Services Medflight 
Mutual Aid 
Well Being Checks 


3 
80 
10 


Details 2 Cancelled/Refusals 
Rendered 39 Received 


146 
41 


FIRE DEPARTMENT 












Alarms 












Box 
False 
Still 
Residential 








118 

71 

451 

57 




Services 












Ambulance Assist 
Appliances 
Brush and Grass 
Burners Oil 
Gas 
Carbon Monoxide Alarms 
Details 
Dumpsters 




115 
12 
17 
6 
4 
8 
2 
5 




Haz-mat 
Investigations 
Motor Vehicles 
Motor Vehicle Accidents 
Mutual Aid Rendered 
Received 
Police Assist 


46 
80 

2 
84 
13 
11 

4 



34 



Services (continued) 








Electrical 


14 






Fuel Spills 


7 


Station Coverage 


1 


Gas Leaks/Investigations 


31 


Structures 


10 


Med-Flight 


4 


Storm Related 


15 


Fireworks 





Searches 


2 


Public Assistance 




Permits Issued 




Lock Outs 


34 


Blasting 


1 


Pumping Cellars 


10 


Bonfire 


1 


Water Problems 


18 


Burning 


342 


Other 


96 


Fuel Storage 


48 






Sprinkler Inst/ Alt 


8 


Inspections 




Propane Storage 


17 


Blasting 


6 


U/Tank Removal 


1 


Fire Prevention 


30 


Fire Alarm Inst. 


20 


Fuel Storage 


48 


Tank Truck 


4 


New Residential 


15 


Welding 


2 


Smoke Detectors New 


35 






Resale 


131 






Oil Burners 


38 






Wood Stoves 


3 






U/Tank Removal 


1 






AST/Removal 


16 







35 



INSPECTION DEPARTMENT 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The following is our annual report for the year ending December 31, 2006: 

Department Permits Inspections Income Expenses 

2005 2006 2005 2006 2005 2006 2005 2006 

Building 424 458 1,796 2,506 $221,788 $291,960 $45,219 $71,776 

Plumbing/Gas 415 322 368 353 $15,700 $14,435 $9,255 $9,104 
Wiring 405 401 647 918 $27,052 $31,805 $23,087 $19,220 

Total revenue from the issuance of permits and fees for inspections for the calendar year 
2006 were $296,435 as compared to $264,188.00 in 2005. Expenses for 2006 were 
$100,101.00 as compared $77,561.00 in 2005. 



BUILDING INSPECTION 



A breakdown of building permits issued is listed below: 




New single family dwellings 


13 


Multi Family (Condo's) 





Complete partially finished single dwellings 





Additions to private dwellings 


62 


Renovations to private dwellings 


128 


Additions & renovations to business/industrial buildings 


9 


New industrial/business buildings 


1 


Family Apartments 





2 Family Apartments 





Shingling roof & installation of sidewalls 


118 


Private swimming pools 


17 


Accessory buildings 


9 


Residential garages 


17 


Demolition's 


12 


Tents (temporary) & Construction trailers 


7 


Signs 


12 


Stoves (solid fuel burning/chimneys) 


16 


New windows 


26 


Total 447 



36 



Occupancy certificates were issued for 4 new residences in 2006, as compared to 12 in 
2005. 

Inspections for certification of business, schools, multi-family dwellings, nursing 
homes and pre-schools amounted to 25 inspections for 2006. 



2005 2006 

New Dwellings $4,660,000 $1 1,037,930 

Renovations and additions, pools, shingling, 10,599,873 12,869,050 

sidewalls, etc. on residential 

New Construction business and industry 2,300,000 



Renovations and additions business and industry 


28,500 


486,380 


Multi-family dwellings 








Two family dwellings 








Family Apartments 









Whether you are planning to add a pool, a deck, reshingle, apply siding or install 
replacement windows, most changes to your home require a building permit. These 
comprehensive building laws may seem cumbersome, but they are meant to benefit us 
all by monitoring the building and development activities in our community. Please, 
also remember that the placement of any type of structure, as simple as a tool shed 
(accessory building) on your property must adhere to the rules and regulations of the 
Medfield Zoning Bylaws, and in most cases a building permit is required. Before you 
proceed with any changes to your home or property, please call the Inspection 
Department at the Town Hall (359-8505, ext. 603) and we will help you get started in 
the process of applying for a permit. 

Enforcement of the State Building Code (780 CMR - 6th Edition) continues to be the 
responsibility of the local building inspectors. Legislation effective 7/1/92 requiring 
contractors to be registered with the Commonwealth became the responsibility of the 
Inspection Department staff to institute procedural changes for compliance. The office 
of the Inspection Department also keeps an accurate registration of builders holding 
State Construction Supervisor's licenses in order to assure compliance with Section 
109.1.1 of the State Building Code. The building inspectors continue the enforcement 
to the code by making inspections of schools, churches and rest homes as well as other 
places of assembly on a periodic basis. 



37 



The Inspectors of Buildings also serve the town in the capacity of Enforcing Officers 
for Zoning and as such, made 113 inspections to investigate complaints and inquiries 
brought to their attention by residents as well as other town boards and departments. 



The assistance and cooperation of Fire Chief Kingsbury during inspections was greatly 
appreciated. The Fire Chief and the Inspectors continue to inspect smoke detectors in 
new construction and in additions and renovations as well as inspecting the installation 
of solid fuel burning appliances. Residents are reminded of the importance of having 
their wood stove installations inspected and certified in accordance with requirements 
of the Massachusetts State Building Code. 

Thank-you to Pat Iafolla-Walsh, Administrative Assistant, Jeffery Bryan, and 
Christopher Cronin, Assistant Building Inspectors. A special thanks again this year to 
Margaret Warren for her continued help in this office. Welcome to John Mahoney, 
Assistant Building Inspector. 

PLUMBING AND GAS INSPECTION 

The purpose of the position of the Plumbing and Gas Inspector is to administer, 
investigate and enforce the Uniform State Plumbing Code and State Fuel Gas Code. 
Homeowners cannot be issued plumbing or gas permits. Permits can only be issued to 
a licensed Journeyman or a Master Plumber. Plumbing or gas cannot be installed, 
altered, removed, replaced, or repaired until the Inspector of Plumbing or Gas has 
issued a permit. The Inspection Department will be glad to help you make the 
determination concerning the need for plumbing and gas permits. When a citizen of 
the town requests the plumber or gas fitter to apply for a permit, he is getting the 
assurance that the installation will not only be installed correctly and safely, but also 
that the work will be installed by a professional and not exploited by non 
professionals. It is definitely in the homeowner's interest to insist on inspections by 
qualified town inspectors knowledgeable in their trade. It is money well spent. 

The Plumbing Code is constantly being changed and upgraded to try to give the 
consumer and the plumber a direction that will assure a safe installation. Of great 
concern lately is the installation of backflow prevention devices, where necessary, to 
insure the continuance of the good clean potable water of which we are very proud in 
Medfield. 

The assistance of John Fratolillo was greatly appreciated again this year. 



38 



WIRING INSPECTION 

The Wiring Inspector continues to enforce the Massachusetts Electric Code as well as 
the National Electric Code in his inspections of wiring installations for which permits 
are issued. Residents are reminded that the permitting process is in effect to assure 
safe and correct installations. 

Thank you this year to Peter Diamond, Joseph Wallace, Joseph Erskine, and William 
McCarthy, Assistant Electrical Inspectors. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Walter Tortorici, Inspector of Buildings 
James Leonard, Inspector of Wires 
John A. Rose Jr., Plumbing Inspector 
Peter Navis, Gas Inspector 



39 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The following is the Annual Report for the Sealer of Weights and Measures for the 
calendar year ending December 31, 2006. 

Measuring devices tested and sealed as required by Massachusetts law: 

Weighing scales and balances 55 

Weights 22 

Liquid measuring meters (in gasoline pumps) 65 

Linear measures (yardsticks and tape measures) 4 



Seventy-three packaged grocery items were tested for correct weight and/or inspected 
for required markings. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Michael J. Clancy 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 



40 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Conservation Commission administers the Massachusetts Wetlands Protection Act, 
M.G.L. Chapter 131, Section 40, the Department of Environmental Protection's 
Stormwater Management Policy and the Medfield Wetlands Bylaw, Article IX. These 
laws protect the wetlands and waterways of Medfield. The functions of these laws are to 
safeguard public surface and groundwater supplies and to prevent damage from flooding 
by preserving the following resource areas: floodplains, swamps and bogs, streams, 
ponds and other water bodies, and certain types of land adjoining them. Under the 
Medfield Wetlands Bylaw, vernal pools and a 50-foot no-disturb buffer area are protected 
resource areas. Anyone proposing to alter a resource area or land subject to flooding, or 
to perform work within 100 feet of a wetlands or bank, or within 200 feet of a river or 
perennial stream must file for a permit with the Conservation Commission. Anyone 
wishing to work within these protected areas must satisfy the Commission that the 
proposed work would not significantly harm the resources. 

The Town benefits from the wetlands protection laws and their associated regulations as 
they protect Medfield' s wetlands from pollution, nutrient overloading and encroachment 
and provide guidance and consistency to applicants with regards to the Commission's 
rules and regulations for various construction projects. The Commission's preeminent 
concern is to ensure that the eight interests of the Massachusetts Wetlands Protection Act 
and the Medfield Wetlands Bylaw are upheld. The eight important public interests or 
values are: protection of public and private water supply, protection of groundwater 
supply, flood control, storm damage prevention, prevention of pollution, protection of 
land containing shellfish, protection of fisheries and protection of wildlife habitat, as they 
relate to the Massachusetts Wetlands Protection Act and the Medfield Wetlands Bylaw. 

In 2006, the Commission held 17 public meetings for the purpose of: 10 Requests for 
Determinations of Applicability, 17 Notices of Intent, 1 Abbreviated Notice of Resource 
Area Delineations and 8 violations. The Commission issued $ 1 ,275 in fines for wetlands 
violations. 

In addition to the regulatory responsibilities of wetlands protection, the Commission is 
charged by the Conservation Commission Act to actively protect the watershed resources 
of the town and to promote and develop natural resources of the town. The Commission 
actively pursues the acquisition of land for conservation and passive recreation use. The 
Commission provides support to the Open Space Committee in its efforts to identify and 
acquire parcels of open land for the Town, and coordinates with the Planning Board in its 
consideration of subdivisions with significant wetlands implications. 



41 



During 2006 the Conservation Commission initiated the pond management plans 
proposed by its Clean Pond Study Group. The group continues to monitor the health 
of Meetinghouse, Cemetery, and Danielson Ponds. Flynn's and Kingsbury Ponds were 
targeted by the study group for management review in the spring of 2007. 

Aquatic Control Technology, pond management consultant for Meetinghouse, Cemetery, 
and Danielson Ponds, provided the initial steps to help keep these ponds as open waters. 
Chemicals were used on specific plant growth where it was appropriate. Hand-pulling 
techniques and hydro-raking were also used to control vegetation. 

Meetinghouse Pond received the appropriate chemical treatment to control the growth of 
the target plant, non-native variable watermilfoil. Cemetery Pond was treated with an 
algaecide to control filamentous algae. A small, isolated stand of non-native watermilfoil 
was hand-pulled from Cemetery Pond. Danielson Pond was hydro-raked to remove the 
dense pond cover of water lily growth. A total of approximately 861 cubic yards of plant 
material was removed from Danielson Pond. Post evaluations of all three ponds showed 
no adverse impacts on the wildlife habitats of the ponds. 

The Conservation Commission meets on the first and third Thursdays of the month. The 
Conservation Office is located on the second floor of Town Hall, Room 209 and is open 
on Wednesdays and Thursdays during normal business hours. As site inspections for 
projects are generally completed on Wednesdays and Thursdays during the morning, 
always call the office, 508 359-8505, ext. 646, for an appointment. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Ralph A. Parmigiane, Chairman 
Michael Perloff, Vice-Chaairman 
Deborah J. Bero 
Philip J. Bun- 
Robert E. Kennedy 
Marie Zack Nolan 
Bruce Redfield 



42 



MEDFIELD HISTORICAL COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Board of Selectmen appoints the Medfield Historical Commission. Our job is to 
identify and protect Medfield' s historical and archaeological assets. We make sure 
historic preservation is considered in community planning and development decisions. 
The commission has an annual budget of some $3,500, and it has certain statutory 
authority. Its monthly meetings in the town hall are open to the public. 

We are proud of the work we do for Medfield and feel we deliver a lot of bang for the 
buck. Along with many other groups, we work proactively to preserve those qualities 
of the town that residents say they want, which helps preserve property values. We 
walk the narrow, fuzzy line between historic preservation... and respecting the 
property rights of owners, too many of whom are all in favor of history... as long as it 
doesn't affect their bottom line when they want to demolish an antique to make room 
for a McMansion (see demolition delay section below). 

We commend the local history programs in the schools that help younger people learn 
to respect this old town. 

(The Medfield Historical Society, with which the commission is often confused, is a 
valuable, private, not-for-profit organization of history enthusiasts. It is based at 6 
Pleasant Street.) 

Demolition Delay Bylaw 

Medfield was one of the first Massachusetts communities with a demolition delay 
bylaw, and ours is one of the most stringent. It prevents historically significant 
buildings - non-renewable resources ~ from being demolished before serious efforts 
have been made to rehabilitate or restore them. The bylaw URL is 

http://www.town.medfield.net/Bvlaws.pdf 

Working in cooperation with the building inspector, the commission looks at every 
application to demolish a building over 50 years old. It investigates and holds 
hearings on those that may be historically significant. If a building is then declared 
"preferably preserved," its demolition may be delayed for up to a year. The 
commission always seeks win-win solutions - such as rehab and adaptive reuse of at 
least part of the building ~ that serve the interests of both the property owner and 
historic preservation. We define lose-lose as when the owner refuses to negotiate and 
instead simply waits us out for the full year and then demolishes the structure. 

2006 was not a banner year for historic preservation in Medfield. Despite 
extraordinary efforts by the historical commission, and some cooperation of the 



43 



developer, a charming World War I-era Craftsman-style house in good condition on 
Spring Street was torn down because it was in the way of a new housing development. 
And we had to let a 1950 Hodgson house on Wight Street be torn down because of a 
error in the permitting process. The Hodgson house was small but in excellent 
condition, and the commission felt it could have been an attractive outbuilding when 
combined with a larger new house. The builder did not agree. 

We lost the last of what had once been three beautiful horse barns gracing Pine Street. 
The commission is exploring ways to deal more effectively with demolition by 
neglect. 

Grant for Vine Lake Cemetery Restoration 

In 2005 the Medfield Historical Commission applied for and was awarded a matching 
grant from the Massachusetts Preservation Projects Fund to repair steps and 
gravestones in the oldest (1651) part of Vine Lake Cemetery. The work is to be 
completed by June 2007. 

This restoration work follows recommendations in the Vine Lake Cemetery 
Preservation and Management Plan, which was prepared in 2004 with the help of a 
grant from the US Interior Department, via the Massachusetts Historical Commission. 
This 100+ page document is available for anyone to read at the public library and at 
the historical society. The book provides much historical information about the 
cemetery, which has long been recognized as one of the town's most important 
historical assets. 

Thanks to its CLG (Certified Local Government - and we have to reapply every year) 
status, Medfield has received many survey and planning grants from the state and 
federal governments in recent years. The Massachusetts Historical Commission 
continues to encourage us to apply because they believe we put the money to good 
use. 

For our survey and planning work, our demolition delay activism, MAAC, and other 
activities, the Massachusetts Historical Commission has long pointed to Medfield as a 
model for other historical commissions. 

Medfield Archaeological Advisory Committee (MACC) 

The Medfield Archaeology Advisory Committee was formed in 1993 as a 
subcommittee of the Medfield Historical Commission. It was formed to help protect 
archaeologically sensitive areas in town. MAAC members are John A. Thompson, 
Chairman; Electa Tritsch; Debbie Gaines; C. B. Doub; Jackie Wile; and Burgess P. 
Standley. 

On an ongoing basis, the committee maintains and updates a map of the 
archaeologically sensitive areas, helps protect the sites, evaluates and registers 
artifacts, and provides educational services. 



44 



Of continuing MAAC interest is the Morse cellar hole, a landlocked site off East Main 
Street. Samuel Morse built a house on the land in 1663, and it was burned in King 
Philip's attack in 1676. An archaeological dig in 2004 turned up a number of daily 
living artifacts. The site had been essentially undisturbed for over 325 years! MAAC 
plans to seek a conservation restriction if the land is sold. 

MAAC welcomes inquiries from anyone who thinks a property in Medfield is 
threatened or finds an artifact that they would like to bring to the attention of the 
committee; please contact John A. Thompson or any other member. 

Want to join our commission? 

Vacancies occur on the historical commission from time to time. If you're interested 
in Medfield's history, call any of the members, or show up at one of our monthly 
public meetings, and let's get to know each other. You could start as an associate 
member and become a full member if someone resigns. 



Respectfully submitted, 

David Temple, Co-chair 
Daniel Bibel, Co-chair 
Maria Baler 
Jonathan Gray 
Charles Navratil 
Burgess P. Standley 
Ancelin Wolfe 



45 



HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectman 
and Residents of Medfield: 



OVERVIEW 

The Historic District Commission administers the Town's four Historic Districts: 

• The John Metcalf Historic District established in 1989 on West Main Street, 
enlarged in 1996 and in 2004. 

• The Hospital Farm Historic District established in 1994. 

• The Clark-Kingsbury Farm Historic District established in 1997. 

• The Medfield Town Center Historic District established in 2000 

PURPOSE AND SCOPE OF THE HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 

Authority to create Historic Districts and the accompanying governing body is granted 
under the Historic District Act of 1960, Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40C. 
The purpose of the law is threefold: 

• to preserve and protect the distinctive characteristics of buildings and places 
significant in the history of the Commonwealth and its cities and towns 

• to maintain and improve the settings of those buildings and places 

• to encourage new designs compatible with existing buildings in the district 

Under Chapter 40C, communities can create Local Historic Districts to protect the 
character of historic areas. Town-appointed Local Historic Commissions govern such 
districts. Since each property owner within a district contributes to the overall historic 
character, changes proposed for the exterior of any property, as well as new 
construction, are considered in light of the impact they may have on the district as a 
whole. Before a property owner within a district is allowed to change an exterior 
architectural feature of a building, the owner must receive approval from the Local 
Historic Commission. Approval is in the form of a certificate of appropriateness, 
hardship or non-applicability with respect to such construction or alteration. 

There are now Local Historic Districts in over one hundred Massachusetts towns and 
cities. Historic Districts do not prevent changes from occurring, nor do they prevent 
new construction. The intent of any Local Historic District is not to halt growth, but to 
allow for thoughtful consideration of change, to allow changes and additions that are 
harmonious, and prevent the intrusion of incongruous elements that might distract 
from the aesthetic and historic values of the district. Local Historic District 
Commissions have authority only over the portion of the exterior of a building that can 



46 



be seen from a public street, way or park. The Commission's Guidelines for Changes 
within Medfield Local Historic Districts is available upon request. 

HISTORIC DISTRICTS IN MEDFIELD 

Medfield passed "Historic Districts", Article 14 of the bylaws, and created the John 
Metcalf Historic District through a vote of the 1989 annual Town Meeting. This first 
district included for historic houses on west Main Street and included the oldest 
portion of Vine Lake Cemetery. Through a vote of the annual Town Meeting in 1996, 
the John Metcalf Historic District was enlarged to include a total of sixteen historic 
buildings. 

The Town established a second historic district, The Hospital Farm Historic District, 
in 1994. It includes 33 buildings at the Medfield State Hospital, and the surrounding 
historic landscape. The buildings were built at the turn of this century, mostly in the 
Queen Anne Revival style, and are grouped around a large quadrangle, resembling the 
campus of a small college. 

In 1997, the Clark- Kingsbury Farm Historic District, Medfield' s third district, was 
established. It provides protection to the historic and unique grouping of the 18 th 
century Clark-Kingsbury farmhouse, outbuildings and pond with gristmill that forms a 
widely appreciated and essential part of the rural character of Medfield. 

In April of 2000, the Medfield Town Center Historic District was created by 
unanimous vote of Town Meeting. This proposed district is intended to preserve and 
protect the character of the Center of the town of Medfield. 

The Town Center of Medfield is important for its mix of civic, commercial, and 
residential properties. Each category has an integral function in the town and over the 
years as the town has developed, each building, in its own unique way, has been 
significant in the developing character of the Town Center. While the other historic 
districts in Medfield are primarily residential, an unusual aspect of this proposed 
historic district is the concentration of civic and commercial buildings in addition to its 
residential ones. Historically, where the civic buildings provided the center of town 
government, education, religious and social activity, the industrial and commercial 
buildings served as the hub of Medfield' s active and developing economy. 



ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND PLANS 

• The Commission has revised its Guidelines for Changes within Medfield Local 
Historic Districts. It is more user friendly and address the needs of those 
homeowners with non-historic properties within the four Historic Districts in 
Medfield 



47 



The Commission issued a Certificate of Appropriateness for a structure within 

the John Metcalf Historic District. These included applications for an addition 

and alterations to 608 Main Street 

The Commission issued a Certificate of Appropriateness to add an elevator and 

new entry to the Unitarian Church at 30 North Street, within the Town Center 

Historic District. 

We are always interested in assisting residents in the creation of new historic 

districts for their neighborhoods and always looking for volunteers to help with 

our efforts. 



Respectfully submitted, 



David Sharff, Chair 
Barbara Jacobs 
Burgess Standley 
Connie Sweeney 
Michael Taylor 



48 



KEEPERS OF THE TOWN CLOCK 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Keepers of the Town Clock are pleased to submit their annual report for 2006. 

Frank Sinatra said it best, "It was a good year, a very good year." Aside from setting 
the clock for Daylight Savings Time and Eastern Standard Time, your Town Clock 
had no service interruptions for the entire year. The winter weather of 2006 was quite 
bearable, and as a result, the Town Clock was spared the mishaps of previous years 
when ice would freeze the southeast clock hands and proceed to strip all screws in the 
second story works. 

The Town Clock did not need a full service, but instead visual inspections of all 
moving parts were all that was necessary. Co-Keeper David Maxson did align the 
flats with set screws in the second story of the clock tower as occasionally the screws 
will loosen and thus deprive the four clock faces the rotational power to turn the hands 
synchronously. 

An estimate of needed repairs to the staircase and flooring supporting the Town Clock 
was submitted to the Board of Selectmen. The Keepers of the Town Clock are 
cognizant of the need to maintain vigilance over Medfield budgets, but it is the 
Keepers' opinion that the time is quite near for these necessary repairs. 

The Keepers of the Town Clock would like to thank the Residents of Medfield and the 
Selectmen for their continued support in the care and maintenance of the Town Clock. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Marc R. Tishler 
David P. Maxson 
Co-Keepers of the Town Clock 



49 



MEMORIAL PUBLIC LIBRARY 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

It is my pleasure to submit the 2006 annual report for the Medfield Memorial Public Library. 
This was another dynamic year with a total circulation of 234,179 items being borrowed for 
fiscal year 2006. Non-resident circulation was 45,026. 

Print materials, including adult, young adult and juvenile, accounted for nearly 60% of 
circulation, despite growing usage of audiovisual materials. The audiovisual collections 
represented approximately 40% of total circulation. This follows a nation-wide trend of 
increased use and growing numbers of audiovisual materials in public libraries. Audiovisual 
materials available to the public increased to over 13,700 videos, DVD's, cassettes, compact 
discs, CD-ROM's, and kits combining books with audiovisuals materials. Library collections 
overall grew by 5.8 percent to 79,477. 

Medfield Public Library is one of 41 member libraries of the Minuteman Library Network. 
This network provides the automated circulation and catalog for its member libraries. 
Individuals can now request or renew materials in the network from their home or office 
computers. Despite a significant increase in the volume of materials being sent throughout the 
system, the wait time for most materials has been reduced and is viewed in general very 
favorably by the public. 

The Library "Bestsellers Club" continues to be a popular way for patrons to automatically 
reserve the latest popular titles by their favorite authors. Multiple copies of popular titles are 
purchased so that there isn't too long a wait. The Library also receives copies from other 
libraries in the system so that the wait time is lessened for the library patron. 

Circulation staff provided friendly assistance and a welcoming attitude to the public while 
averaging the second highest circulation per staff person of the 57 community libraries in our 
population range in the state of Massachusetts for fiscal year 2006. The average number of 
items circulated by each full-time equivalent staff person was 26,611 for fiscal year 2006. 
Staff also assisted individuals in finding leisure reading materials, materials for research, and 
with general information and aid. 

Reference Librarians were busy throughout the year assisting people with reference questions, 
aiding in reader's advisory service, offering research assistance, providing one-to-one 
instruction on navigating the Internet and in locating information in online databases. They 
also kept the public Internet and catalog computers and printers running throughout the year. 
Working with school librarians and teachers to supplement curriculum needs of students was 
another important function for reference staff. 

The Children's Room was the center of activity for younger library patrons. Children's 
Librarians, Ann Russo and Jean Todesca, provided numerous programs for toddlers, 
preschoolers, and school-age children. Puppet shows, evening PJ storytimes, musical 
performances, a summer reading program, and programs for parents made for an event-filled 
year. More than 2,200 items were added to the various children's collections. 



50 



Under the leadership of Kathy Brennan, the Friends of the Library provided ongoing support 
for the library and its programs throughout the year. They again provided funding for the 
children's storytimes and special programs. They also funded the purchase of new books, 
audiovisual materials, and equipment for the library and continued their popular program of 
providing museum passes for the public. Several subject areas, such as large print, art books, 
books on compact disc, books on cassette, and young adult and children's materials were 
appreciably increased by their generosity. 

The Library Endowment Fund Board of Trustees, under the chairmanship of Timothy 
Borchers, continued its financial assistance to the library. The Library Endowment Fund 
made donations to purchase more materials for the children's book, young adult book and 
books-on-compact disc collections. 

Volunteers were another significant factor in making a successful year for the library. The 
many individuals who volunteered to work in the library were greatly appreciated by both 
staff and public. Volunteers served in both the circulation and children's departments. 
Numerous individuals assisted in shelving returned materials for the circulation department. 



ANNUAL STATISTICS 

New Library Materials Added 7,618 Total Materials Owned 79,477 

Circulation of Materials 234,179 Number of Registered Borrowers 9,364 



Respectfully submitted, 

Dan Brassell 
Library Director 



51 



Trustees of Memorial Public Library 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield 

The Trustees of the Memorial Public Library report that the library's resources 
continue to be well utilized by the residents of Medfield. Such services include an on- 
hand collection of 79,000 items and access to 6 million more items through the 
library's association with the Minuteman Library Network, meeting space that hosted 
over 400 meetings in 2006, children's summer reading programs, computer and 
internet access through the library's multiple terminals, and immediate and in-person 
reference help. Another measurement of the library's extensive use in 2006 was the 
total circulation of 215,000 items, the fifth year in a row that total circulation topped 
200,000 items. In addition, the library continues to be a main draw to downtown 
Medfield as approximately 20% of the library's circulation was to patrons from 
surrounding towns. 

2006 will also be remembered as the year of rising utility costs. While significant 
increases in gas, electricity and water did strain the operating budget, the library was 
able to keep total expenses within budgeted levels for the year. Despite the challenges 
in operating expenses, the library was able to increase its overall collection aided by 
fund raising efforts by the Friends of the Library and The Medfield Library Trust 
Fund. 

The Trustees would like to recognize Library Director Dan Brassell and his staff for 
their commitment to operating a strong and vibrant library. In addition, the Trustees 
thank the Friends of the Library for their generosity and the Residents of Medfield for 
their continued use and support of the Medfield Public Library. 



Respectfully Submitted, 

John Bankert, Chair 
Robert Luttman 
Maura McNicholas 
Isobel Palson 
Jane Ready 
James Whalen 



52 



COMMITTEE TO STUDY MEMORIALS 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Committee to Study Memorials is pleased to submit its seventeenth Annual 
Report. 

During the year we have continued to nurture the plantings and seeding of the grass at 
Baxter Memorial Veterans' Park. The Park is a wonderful creation of beauty and an 
everlasting memorial to our Veterans of all wars. It is a great place, in the center of 
Medfield, for one to come and sit in solitude, read the memorial bricks in the 
walkways or to reflect and read the names on the monuments. 

This year we installed seven beautiful park benches. Three are on the Main Walkway, 
which are all sold. The other four are on the Veterans' Walkway. These are each 
available for $2500.00. This is a wonderful way to honor a Veteran. 

We wish to thank the Medfield Highway Department for their manpower and 
expertise in pouring the concrete, assembling the benches and installing them on the 
concrete. We would also like to thank Tresca Bros, of Millis for their generous 
donation of concrete for all the benches. 

We also wish to thank the residents of Medfield and the Medfield Parks and 
Recreation Department who have made this park possible. 



Respectfully submitted, 

G. Marshall Chick, Chairman 
Richard DeSorgher 
Frank Iafolla 
Jane M. Lomax 
David Temple 



53 



VETERANS' SERVICE OFFICER 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit my seventh report as Veterans' Service Officer for the Town of 
Medfield. 

Veterans Services include helping the Veteran with benefits of hospitalization, pension 
assistance, information on education, social security and burial allowances. This 
assistance includes fuel, food, clothing, housing and expenses for Veterans and their 
families. Every Veteran should enroll in VA medical services in case of an 
emergency; forms are available at the Town Hall or by calling 508 359-8505 ext 632. 
Also available are applications for Veterans' License Plates and the Korean War 
Service Medal for service in Korea from June 25, 1950 to July 27, 1953. 

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts authorizes services and assistance rendered 
Medfield Veterans and their dependents. The Commonwealth reimburses the Town 
seventy- five percent of the benefits extended. 

I wish to thank Town officials and especially Town Clerk Carol Mayer for her 
assistance and helpfulness during the year. 



Respectfully submitted, 

G. Marshall Chick 
Veterans' Service Officer 



54 



MEMORIAL DAY ADDRESS 2006 
Given by G. Marshall Chick 
U S Army, Korean Veteran 



Good morning, members of the Clergy, distinguished guests, ladies and gentlemen, 
boys and girls, and fellow veterans. 

Welcome to Baxter Veterans' Memorial Park, the show place of Norfolk County. 

Memorial Day is a day to honor and remember our fallen heroes who have died 
protecting our freedom. Veterans' Day is to honor all our Veterans who have served 
this great nation. 

FREEDOM IS NOT FREE. 

The land of the free and the home of the brave. 

It is the land of the free because it is the home of the brave Veteran who gave the last 
full measure and paid the supreme sacrifice so that we may all be free. 

Today take a moment to reflect on our past history and remember those who have 
given us our freedom. 

We remember today American Patriots who courageously and resolutely put 
themselves in harms way for the greater good, for Liberty, for self-determination, for a 
safe and peaceful place to live. Freedom is Not Free. 

Statistics show that throughout our country's history, through all the wars, casualties 
of our military, as a direct result of combat action, now totals over 1 .2 million killed. 
1 .2 million brave men and women we honor here today. 

Like many here, I have had the honor of serving our country in the military on the 
field of battle. War fighters witness many terrible things. Some have suffered the loss 
of a gallant friend in the blink of an eye. Some sustained crippling wounds and 
experience great hardships but go on to lead normal protective lives. I share this 
because I have never been so proud to be an American and to witness the real spirit 
that is America. I know in my heart that it is the same feeling and selfless spirit I see 
as Veterans' Service Officer for the Town of Medfield. The young soldiers returning 
home are worthy of our honor and to be proud of. 

On a personal note, the troop ship I was on returning from Korea was entering Seattle 
Harbor where on a warehouse on the dock was a large banner depicting WELCOME 
HOME DEFENDERS OF FREEDOM. My immediate reaction was the real defenders 



55 



of freedom, 58,000, who were not returning but gave the supreme sacrifice. Freedom 
is Not Free. 

Today we honor their sacrifice here in Medfield. We honor them from the bridge in 
Concord, through Gettysburg, the Argonne forest, the beaches of Normandy, the sands 
of Iwo Jima, the Chosin Reservoir, Vietnam, Mogadishu, Afghanistan, Iraq, Kosovo 
and other smaller skirmishes. Freedom is Not Free. 

We can never repay these men and women but we will not forget what we owe to 
these fallen heroes. We will not and we cannot forget. Once we forget and stop 
honoring them, then we have not only lost the meaning of freedom but we have 
actually lost that freedom. 

And to the children, this is what it is all about. So that you may live your lives in this 
great nation, living in the knowledge that these sacrifices were for you so that you can 
live in freedom. 

FREEDOM IS NOT FREE 

Today, thank a Veteran for that freedom. God bless the Veteran and may God Bless 
America. 

Thank you. 



56 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

In the calendar year of 2006, the Board of Health welcomed two associate members, 
Laura Einbinder and Melissa Stuart. The members of the Board of Health would like 
to welcome Mrs. Einbinder and Mrs. Stuart and thank them for their assistance and 
dedication to the Town of Medfield. 

The Board of Health holds its meetings on the second Wednesday evening of each 
month at 6:30 PM. These meetings are open to the public and citizens are invited to 
attend. The Board of Health office is attended Monday through Friday from 9:00 am 
to 1:00 pm. 

Public Health 

Jean Sniffin, RN, BA of Century Health Systems continues to provide programs in 
health promotion to all age groups, supplementing traditional home health services. 
The major components of the Health Promotion Program are: 

Communicable Disease 

Prevention and control of communicable disease through caseload, referrals, education 
and provision of follow up care consistent with public health practice. Total 
communicable disease reports numbered 64, with approximately two-thirds identified 
as Lyme disease. 

Public Health 

The Board of Health would once again like to acknowledge and thank local residents, 
Jean Brown, RN, Joan Iafolla, RN and Joan Wood who volunteer their assistance to 
Jean Sniffin in order to ensure that the clinics run smoothly. 

The Medfield Board of Health continues to serve as a depot for the Massachusetts 
Department of Public Health Immunization Program. The program supplies area 
providers with immunizations and vaccines free of charge through the Department of 
Public Health. 

Health Maintenance: 

Jean provides home visits as needed to residents who are homebound and have 
multiple chronic illnesses or conditions. The goal of the program is to assess changes 
in physical condition and the appropriate referral for medical care and/or social 
services. This prevents complications and unnecessary hospitalizations. Ambulatory 
residents are seen for physical assessment, health counseling, including hypertension 
screening, at the public clinics held each month at the Pfaff Center, Tilden Village and 
the Public Library. 






57 



Environmental 

William R. Domey, P.E., M.S.C.E., provided Environmental and Civil Engineering 
services to the Board of Health. These services include: Oversight of septic systems 
including soil evaluations, determination of high groundwater, review of engineering 
plans for compliance with Title 5 and the Board of Health regulations, inspection of 
construction, evaluation of variance requests, and issuance of certificates of 
compliance; Review of Site Plans and preliminary and definitive Subdivision Plans for 
compliance with the Board of Health stormwater regulations and suitability for on-site 
sewage disposal where applicable; Review of On-site Well water proposals, water 
quality and quantity results, and treatment units; Review of Title 5 inspection reports 
that are performed, most often at time of sale, to assure that the inspector has followed 
the state mandated procedures for the evaluation; Review of Building Permit 
applications for additions and renovations to assure that the proposed work does not 
conflict with the location or capacity of the septic system serving the property; 
Investigation of complaints regarding sewage overflows, odors, illegal dumping, 
hazardous waste, and preparation of enforcement orders where applicable, and 
working with offending parties to attain compliance; Issuance of Disposal System 
Installer and Septage Hauler Permits; Provision of general consultation to the Board of 
Health; Assistance to the Board of Health in the preparation of regulations and 
guidelines; Attendance at Board of Health meetings; and Telephone or office 
consultation for questions and information of residents. 

In the year 2006, as in previous years, the major focus of the Environmental 
Engineer/ Agent has been septic systems, stormwater management, and site plan and 
subdivision reviews. As a result of a high degree of control over septic systems, the 
rate of failure of septic systems constructed since 1 975 remains very low. For those 
who must upgrade, it should be noted that, to assist homeowners to minimize financial 
burden, the Board of Health issues local and state variances as needed to achieve 
Maximum Feasible Compliance. These variances have to be justified by 
documentation of difficult or limited site conditions or excessive construction costs. 
Guidelines are available at the Board of Health office. Reviews of proposed Site Plans 
and Subdivisions were continued or newly conducted for Hammant Farm Subdivision, 
Boiling Spring Avenue Subdivision, Kingsbury Club, Adult Community Center, and 
Quarry Road Subdivision. It should be noted that the long-standing existing 
stormwater regulations of the Board of Health provide Town of Medfield compliance 
with much of the EPA Phase II program. 

The following permits were issued during 2006: 

8 Soil Tests 22 Haulers Permits 

1 1 Septic System Plans 23 Installers Permits 

7 OFFAL Permits 6 Well Permits 

9 9 Septic Repair 47 Form A Additions/Renovations 

8 Septic System Permits for New or upgraded systems 



58 



Sanitation 

Enviro-Tech Consultants' professional staff conducted consulting services for 
enforcement of regulations related to food establishments, housing, massage therapy, 
swimming facilities, recreational camps for children, and general sanitation issues. 

The services and consultation to the Board of Health included attending Board of 
Health meetings, inspections of food establishments and school cafeterias, 
consultation with the Environmental Agent and State agencies. Also inspections and 
reviews were conducted on a semi-public pool and the Hinkley Swim Pond 
recreational facility, which included review of biological reports and support services 
to the Park & Recreation Department and the staff. Camp proposals were reviewed 
with camp operators 

New food establishments were provided with consultation for the opening of their new 
businesses. Also, non-profit facilities were provided with additional updates that 
provide information on food safety. Enviro-Tech Consultants also continued support 
services to the administrative staff on the state and local requirements. 

The following permits were issued during 2006: 

61 Food Services Permit - Includes: 

Restaurants, counter bars, churches, cafeteria food service and vending 
machines. Food stores / markets, bakeries. Temporary food service permits 
and catering services. 

12 Tobacco 

1 1 Massage Therapy (individual & establishment) 

1 Semi Public Pool 

1 Bathing Beach 

4 Camps 

Medfield Youth Outreach 

Medfield Youth Outreach is a program located under the auspices of the Medfield 
Board of Health. The town's Youth Outreach Workers provide short term individual 
and family counseling, information and referral, crisis intervention, community 
programming, and assistance with access to financial assistance programs to Medfield 
residents ages birth to eighteen and their families. The Medfield Youth Outreach 
office is an intake site for the Federal Fuel Assistance Program for all Medfield 
residents. All of Medfield Youth Outreach services are free and confidential . 

The Medfield Youth Outreach Office is located on the 2 nd floor of the Town Hall. 
Appointments can be made by calling (508) 359-7121. Hours are full time and 
flexible to meet programmatic need. 



59 



Information about Medfield Youth Outreach Staff: 

Dawn Alcott, MSW, LICSW, is the Director of Medfield Youth Outreach 
Amanda Peterson, MA, LMHC, is the Medfield Youth Outreach Worker 
Master's level interns may also serve field placements during the year. 

The Board of Health Liaison to the Youth Outreach program is Board of Health 
Member, Marcia Aigler. Marcia meets with Medfield Youth Outreach monthly and 
communicates with the Board of Health regarding Medfield Youth Outreach issues 
and activities. 

Counseling Services 

In calendar year 2006, approximately 1,370 counseling hours were provided to 
Medfield youth and families. Major issues dealt with throughout the calendar year 
included: 

Academic difficulties, divorce, self-esteem, anger management, domestic violence, 
anxiety, family discord, sexual assault, grief, loss, financial difficulties, sexuality, body 
image/eating disorders, major mental illness, social skills, child abuse/neglect, 
oppositional behavior, substance abuse, dating violence, parenting skills, violence, 
depression, relational aggression, self harming behaviors, friendship/ relationship 
concerns 

Medfield Youth Outreach routinely provides outside referrals for clinical services, 
need based programs, support groups, wrap around services, advocacy, and state 
/federal programs. 

Programs 

Medfield Youth Outreach also facilitates various groups, programs, and services with 
in the community that are related to the needs of youth and their families. The 
programs offered are often prevention and psycho-educationally based. This past year 
approximately 350 individuals participated in programs facilitated by Youth Outreach. 

Community Organizing 

Medfield Youth Outreach collaborates with a wide network of organizations to better 
meet the needs of Medfield youth and their families including: The Medfield Youth 
and Community Commission, Medfield Public Schools, Medfield Police Department, 
Norfolk County District Attorney's Office, and various other state and federal 
agencies, professional associations, religious institutions, parent gatherings, and civic 
groups. 

Grant Initiatives 

In 2006, Medfield Youth Outreach wrote a grant on behalf of the Medfield Board of 
Health to The Metrowest Community Health Care Foundation's Youth Substance 
Abuse Initiative. The purpose of this grant initiative is to aid in unifying the whole 
community's approach to handling the problem of youth substance abuse. Multiple 



60 



town department including law enforcement, faith communities, and the public 
schools came together in focus groups to provide the foundation from which the grant 
was written. The Board of Health was proud to be awarded this grant in the total sum 
of $200,000 to be paid over 36 months for the purposes of implementing this 
initiative. This new initiative will begin in 2007 and a sister program to Medfield 
Youth Outreach, under the Board of Health's governance. 

Volunteers 

Medfield Youth Outreach welcomes volunteers to assist with the implementation of 
various programs and fundraising endeavors. Call the Medfield Youth Outreach 
office at 508-359-7121 to inquire. 

Donations 

Medfield Youth Outreach is always seeking to expand the services provided and to 
come up with innovative programming. Funding from donations and grants has been 
utilized to purchase items for the office (play therapy materials), cover the cost of 
special speakers, and to cover staff related expenses when possible. If you are aware 
of grants that may assist in this endeavor please contact the office. If you would like 
to make a tax deductible donation you may do so through the Medfield Foundation on 
the web at www.medfleldfoundation.org . 



NORFOLK COUNTY MOSQUITO CONTROL PROJECT 

The operational program of the Project integrates all proven technologies into an 
Integrated Pest Management (IPM) system of mosquito control and vector 
management that is rational, environmentally sensitive and cost effective. 

All mosquito eggs need water to hatch and to sustain larval growth. 

Water Management Activities 

An important component of our IPM approach is the management of shallow, 
standing, stagnant water, and the maintenance of existing flow systems which if 
neglected can contribute to mosquito breeding. In addition to normal drainage system 
maintenance, Project personnel advised residents on removal of water holding 
artificial containers on their property for the purpose of eliminating potential West 
Nile virus mosquito breeding habitat. 

Drainage ditches checked/cleaned 9,325 feet 

Culverts checked/cleaned 10 culverts 

Larval Control 

Treatment of mosquito larvae during aquatic development is the next most effective 
control effort. The products used during these applications were Bti and Methoprene. 

Aerial larvicide applications 1,167 acres 



61 



Larval control using briquette & granular applications 16.28 acres 

Rain Basin treatments using briquettes (West Nile virus control) 480 basins 

Adult Control 

The suppression of flying adult mosquitoes becomes necessary when they are 
numerous, annoying, and/or threaten public health. The product used during these 
applications was Sumithrin. 

Adult control aerosol applications from trucks 10,192 acres 

Surveillance 

Surveys, inspections, and monitoring in support of our program include GIS mapping 
of breeding areas, larval and adult collections, and fieldwork evaluations leading to 
better water management. West Nile virus and Eastern Equine Encephalitis have been 
active in Norfolk County over the past several years which has resulted in an 
expansion of the surveillance program in collaboration with the Massachusetts 
Department of Public Health (MDPH), State Laboratory Institute. MDPH has 
requested that the Norfolk County Mosquito Control Project expand mosquito 
surveillance across the county for the purpose of detecting viruses in collected 
mosquitoes as an early warning system for the residents of the county. Considerable 
manpower has been reallocated to these efforts, which is not reflected in this report. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Elizabeth Dorisca, Chairperson 
Marcia Aigler, Member 
Kathleen Schapira, Member 



62 



MEDFIELD HOUSING AUTHORITY 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Medfield Housing Authority is pleased to submit its Annual Report for 2006. 

The Authority is committed to working cooperatively with community, state, federal 
and local officials to provide safe, decent and affordable housing. 

For information and/or application for housing at Tilden Village, please contact Donna 
M. Shannon, Executive Director at 508 359-6454. Please note that Medfield residents 
and/or those persons working in Medfield will be given preference regarding 
placement. 

Monthly board meetings are held on the second Wednesday of every month at 7:00 
PM in the office of the Executive Director unless otherwise posted at the Town Hall. 
The meetings are open to the public. 

In April, our beloved Chairman and longtime board member, James T. Regan, passed 
away. Jim was an advocate to the elderly as well as a conscientious and dedicated 
member of our community and will be sorely missed. 

The Selectmen and the Medfield Housing Authority Board voted to appoint Leo J. 
Surette to fill the unexpired term of the late James T. Regan until the March 2007 
town election. 

Valerie A. Mariani was reappointed to serve as the State Appointee on the board for 
the term of office that will expire September 201 1 . 

The Beacon Project from the Dale Street School hosted a wonderful Thanksgiving 
dinner for Tilden residents, which was very well attended and enjoyed by all. 

The Blake Middle School once again hosted a delicious holiday dinner for all our 
residents. The food, the decorations, and especially the students, were all very much 
appreciated. Middle School teacher Kathy Craig who coordinates this event did a 
fantastic job. 

Blood pressure clinics are held on the third Tuesday of every month in the Tilden 
Village Community Room. Flu and pneumonia clinics were also held in the 
Community Room. All town residents are welcome to attend. 

TRIAD meetings are held on the fourth Wednesday of every month in the Tilden 
Village Community Room. Former Police Chief Richard Hurley has graciously 



63 



agreed to stay on as the Acting Chairman of the TRIAD group. The members of 
TRIAD sincerely appreciate the time and effort Chief Hurley puts into planning 
interesting and informative programs. 

The Medfield Housing Authority wishes to express its gratitude and thanks to both the 
Fire Department and the Police Department for their support and assistance during the 
past year. Their support, patience and understanding during difficult times are very 
much appreciated. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Donna M. Shannon, Executive director 

L. Paul Galante Jr., Chairman 

Valerie A. Mariani, Vice Chairperson/State Appointee 

Richard D. Jordan, Treasurer 

Lisa M. Donovan, Assistant Treasurer 

Leo J. Surette, Commissioner 



64 



COUNCIL ON AGING 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Council on Aging continues to grow under the direction of the following board 
members: Mr. Louis Fellini, Chairman, Mrs. Kathy Kristof, Vice Chairwoman, Ms. 
Ruth Nadler, Mrs. Virginia Whyte and our most recent appointed member, Mr. Neil 
DuRoss. This board has been involved in the growth of the COA, by supporting ideas 
and programs that increased participation, and now the COA board is overseeing the 
physical growth. During the fall of 2006 site work and planning for construction of 
the new Adult/Senior Community Center began after awarding the construction 
contract to Northeast Interiors of Braintree. 

This by far is one of the most exciting years for the Medfield Council on Aging. After 
several years of planning, the reality is now here. We have begun building a center 
that will afford the COA many diverse opportunities for programming and services. 

Programs and services continue to be provided in a timely and professional manner 
meeting the needs of the older adult community. Through a unique software program 
installed in March of 2006, the COA is better able to track participation and growth. 
The program has documented the number of people entering the building and 
participating in the many programs offered. In the first half of fiscal year 2007 over 
248 people have participated in over 5000 activities. The Council on Aging has 
operated within the proposed budget over the past year. During 2006 the COA 
received the resignation of Marion Masterson, who was instrumental in developing the 
outreach efforts. Marion is now enjoying her husband John fulltime and their many 
grandchildren! Pat Elliot, R.N. has succeeded Marion and brings new energy and 
compassion to the position. Pat has enthusiastically involved herself in the Caregiver 
and Low Vision support groups, has outreached to many older adults and discovered a 
variety of challenges requiring her expertise. Patsy Nettles continues to recruit new 
volunteers to assist with the many needs of the COA, manages and recruits for the 
Volunteer Driving Program and coordinates the 64 participants of the Tax Work Off 
Program during the year. The newsletter continues to be written and published right 
out of the COA office. A total of 750 newsletters are either sent via the mail or 
delivered to local businesses, Town Hall, and the Library for distribution. Medical 
equipment loans have increased, with 77 pieces of equipment loaned out. 
Transportation under the direction of Juan Anacleto, is at its peak with nearly 1200 
miles driven each month. One of the biggest benefits of our transportation program is 
it allows seniors an opportunity to maintain their independence. 

The Council on Aging is delighted to see our Friends Group (FOSI) as an active and 
supportive extension of the Council on Aging. Mr. William Johnson, as president, 
newly named Vice-president Chuck Conti and FOSI members, Kathleen Kristof, Anne 



65 



Johnson, Irene Bouvier, Virginia Whyte, Carol Wright, Ruth Nadler, Beth Weaver, 
Sue Monroe, Nancy Kashalena, Pat Shapiro and Jane Timmerman have worked 
diligently to fund raise for the interior furnishings of the new building. The semi- 
annual yard sales, the Zullo Gallery Craft sale, the Buy-a-Brick program are all new 
efforts in 2006. The Council on Aging is appreciative for all of the hard work from so 
many people who made these events successful. 

As always, the Council on Aging would like to thank everyone who participates, 
supports and donates to the Council on Aging. This has been an exciting year and we 
look forward to the future in a new building, a building full of programs, activities and 
supportive services. It is through your generosity, support and interest that has 
allowed the Council on Aging this opportunity for growth so we may be better able to 
meet the needs of the older adults in our community. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Roberta Lynch, Director 

Louis Fellini, Chairman 

Kathleen Kristof, Vice Chairwoman 

Ruth Nadler 

Virginia Whyte 

Neil DuRoss 



66 



PARK AND RECREATION COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Medfield Park and Recreation Commission is a five member, elected board of 
volunteers. The Commission is charged with the responsibility of maintaining the 
Pfaff Community Center and 11 other public properties - Town Hall, Library, 
Historical Society, Dwight Derby House, Fire Department, Police Department, 
Metacomet Park, Hinkley Park and Swim Pond, Baxter Park, Meeting House Pond 
and McCarthy Park. 

The Commission's responsibilities include: recruiting qualified personnel; creating 
policies; generating diversified recreational and educational opportunities; monitoring 
the maintenance schedule for public properties; and advising the Director to achieve 
the goals set forth in the Park and Recreation Comprehensive Plan. The department 
consists of a Director and Assistant Director. Additional personnel are recruited to 
teach classes and organize summer programs. Responsibilities of the department 
include: creating, implementing, evaluating and adjusting year round leisure 
experiences; establishing fiscal and personnel plans to complete the objectives for 
each program; monitoring public property usage; and implementing a maintenance 
regime for Town properties. 

The Commission focused our efforts on meeting the demand for a new Town-owned 
and operated Recreation Center. Qualified, independent town residents have studied 
the detail of the new facility's income and expense projections. This study group, 
three appointed by Park and Recreation Representatives and six other independent 
town residents with appropriate professional experience appointed by town officials, 
has concluded that: the town could build and operate a greatly enhanced recreational 
facility and programs with a relatively modest increase in the current town spending 
on the department. Currently, the Medfield Recreation Center will include a teen 
drop-in center, multipurpose rooms, activity rooms, offices and two basketball courts 
with a track. The Commission will continue to evaluate all of our options to give 
Medfield residents a premier facility with minimal cost to the Town. 

The Park and Recreation Department is dedicated to providing quality programs that 
will enhance the quality of life for Medfield residents. The Department offered over 
three hundred affordable enrichment programs throughout the year. Over eight 
thousand individual participants have enjoyed participating in a wide range of 



67 



programs, competed on our athletic fields, reflected in our memorial park and utilized 
our recreational facilities. Park and Recreation is a vital and affordable resource that 
brings our community together. 

We would like to take this opportunity to thank the scores of residents who volunteer 
their time and energies in our recreation and sports programs. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Eileen Murphy 
Lisa Louttit 
Steve Farrar 
Toby Burrell 
Tom Cararagliano 



68 



TREE WARDEN AND INSECT CONTROL DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

This report is for the calendar year ending December 31, 2006. 

During the year debris from several windstorms and snowstorms were removed by the 
Tree Department with help from the Public Works Department. 

Nstar and Verizon continued to perform maintenance in town including branch cutting 
on their main circuits. Their subcontractor was Tree Tech Corporation from Foxboro. 

Stumps from previously removed trees continue to be removed as workload permits. 

McMillan Professional Tree Service continues to have the contract for the pruning and 
removal of town trees. The Town will be accepting new bids for the 2008 calendar 
year. 

Yellow Ash disease continues to be a problem. The department continues to survey, 
recognize and remove potentially hazardous trees before serious problems occur. The 
Winter Moth continues to be a potential problem, which is being monitored. 

Residents are reminded that if they DO NOT wish spraying to be done on their 
property, prior notice must be given to the Town Clerk by registered mail no later than 
March 1 of that year. This notice must be given each year. 

The department would like to thank Lueder Environmental Tree & Landscaping 
Company of Medfield for their help and professional advice throughout the year. 

I would like to thank all the various Town Departments for their helpfulness during 
the year. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Edward M. Hinkley 

Tree Warden 

Director of Insect Pest Control 



69 



NORFOLK COUNTY COMMISSIONERS 



To the Citizens of Norfolk County: 

As Norfolk County Commissioners, we wish to thank our constituents for allowing us 
to serve them. We also thank our elected officials, both state and local, as well as 
county department heads and our employees, for their continued support and hard 
work. 

Various capital projects are underway to improve courthouse and other county 
facilities. These include: repair and resetting of granite stairs at Superior Courthouse, 
along with repair of the lintel, indoor air quality remediation at Stoughton District 
Court, upgrading the fire detection system at Quincy District Courthouse, and 
renovation of several bunkers at Presidents Golf Course. Additional projects are listed 
elsewhere in this report. 

As overseers of county operations, we are constantly reviewing ongoing expenses 
such as health care, payroll, and other costs as well as anticipated revenues. In order 
for Norfolk County to continue providing useful services to our communities, it is our 
fiscal responsibility to scrutinize spending, in order to ensure the county will be amply 
funded via revenues to support itself in future years. 

We are proud of the services that we provide communities through our Registry of 
Deeds, Agricultural High School, Engineering Department, Presidents Golf Course, 
Municipal Regional Services projects, R.S.V.P. and other programs. Municipalities 
are encouraged to contact us regarding obtaining or participating in one or more of our 
ongoing service programs. 

Our gratitude and thanks go out to all who have supported, and continue to support our 
excellent county in its past, present and future endeavors. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Peter H. Collins 

John M. Gillis 

Francis W. O'Brien 

NORFOLK COUNTY COMMISSIONERS 



70 



Metropolitan Area Planning Council 



Created in 1963, the Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC) promotes inter- local 
cooperation and advocates for smart growth by working closely with cities and towns, 
state and federal agencies, non-profit institutions, and community-based organizations in 
the 101 cities and towns of Metropolitan Boston. MAPC strives to provide leadership on 
emerging issues of regional significance by conducting research, building coalitions, and 
acting as a regional forum for action. 

MAPC provides technical assistance and specialized services in land use planning, water 
resources management, transportation, housing, environmental protection, economic 
development, public safety, geographic information systems (GIS), collective purchasing, 
data analysis and research, legislative and regulatory policy, and the facilitation and 
support of inter-local partnerships. More information about MAPC's services and 
ongoing activities is available at www.mapc.org . 

MAPC is governed by 101 municipal government appointees, 21 gubernatorial 
appointees, and 13 appointees of state and City of Boston agencies. An Executive 
Committee comprising 25 elected members oversees agency operations. The agency 
employs approximately 40 professional staff under the leadership of an executive 
director. Funding for MAPC activities is derived from governmental contracts and 
foundation grants, and a per-capita assessment on member municipalities. 

To better serve the people who live and work in Metro Boston, MAPC has divided the 
region into eight subregions. A council of local leaders and stakeholders oversees each 
subregion, and a staff coordinator provides organizational and technical staff support. 

Smart Growth Across Municipal Boundaries 

MAPC's MetroFuture: Making a Greater Boston Region initiative is planning for 
Metro Boston's growth and development through 2030. In 2006, the project involved 
nearly 2000 people. At more than 50 briefings, participants analyzed "Scenario 1: 
Current Trends to 2030," MetroFuture' s "base case" of what the region might look like if 
current trends continue. We also hosted two working sessions in June 2006, where 
participants designed alternatives to the "base case," and two in December 2006, where 
participants chose the scenario they liked the best. In 2007, after additional public input 
and a May 1, 2007 Boston College Citizens Seminar, the project will complete a regional 
strategy to achieve the preferred scenario. 

MAPC assisted cities and towns in a variety of ways throughout 2006. The agency helped 
over 70 cities and town to rewrite zoning by-laws, evaluate smart growth uses for key 
parcels, keep traffic under control and expand transit, deal with crime, and prepare for 
natural disasters. 

As a member of the Massachusetts Smart Growth Alliance, MAPC worked with six 
allied organizations to advocate for sustainable development throughout the 

71 



Commonwealth. MAPC participated in a successful Alliance campaign to recapitalize 
and reform the state's Brownfields Tax Credit; researched, analyzed, and reacted to 
significant state land use and transportation policy proposals, including Governor 
Romney's 20-year transportation plan; and advanced research about the impact of 
sprawling development in Massachusetts. 

In partnership with the 495/MetroWest Corridor Partnership, MAPC produced the 
Massachusetts Low Impact Development Tool Kit, which presents state-of-the-art 
practices for managing 



stormwater and increasing the recharge of water to aquifers. MAPC also produced Once 
is Not Enough: A Guide to Water Reuse in Massachusetts, a manual that describes 
techniques for non-potable reuse of treated wastewater and provides case studies of 
several successful water reuse projects in Massachusetts. In partnership with the U.S. 
Geological Survey, MAPC began work on a hydrologic modeling project that simulates 
the impacts of future development on the water resources of the Charles River and 
Assabet River watersheds. 



Getting Around the Region 

In March 2006, MAPC sponsored a conference on the impact of transportation emissions 
on public health. The workshop began a process to build connections, raise awareness, 
and stimulate action around the issue of air pollution adjacent to major roadways and rail 
corridors. The content and results of this workshop are available at 
www.mapc.org/air quality . 

MAPC developed a Regional Bicycle Plan in 2006 to assess current conditions and to 
guide future improvements to bicycle transportation in the region. The plan reviews goals 
set in previous plans, and proposes six general goals and strategies for the region, 
including encouraging more trips by bicycle in each community, working with state and 
federal agencies to simplify and coordinate funding programs, and increasing regional 
knowledge about bicycling. The plan can be accessed at 
www.mapc.org/transportation/transportation alternatives.html. 

A consistent complain of bicyclists is the lack of parking. To address this need, MAPC 
worked with the MPO and EOT to develop the Regional Bike Parking Program. Under 
this program, MAPC negotiated discount group purchasing contracts with three 
leading vendors of bicycle parking equipment, funded through federal transportation 
funds. More information about MAPC's bicycle and pedestrian planning activities, and 
the bike-parking program, is available at 

www.mapc.org/transportation/transportation alternatives.html . 



72 



Collaboration to Address Shared Municipal Challenges 

MAPC, through its Metro Mayors Coalition, played a leading role in developing 
legislation to create a statewide anti-gang initiative known as the Senator Charles E. 
Shannon Jr. Community Safety Initiative, which supports regional and multi- 
disciplinary gang and youth violence prevention and law enforcement efforts. MAPC 
coordinated Shannon grants totaling $1.2 million for 10 Metro Boston communities and 7 
Essex County communities. These communities used the funds to enhance public safety 
through targeted workforce development, after-school mentoring, re-entry initiatives, 
gang-prevention education, and collaborative community policing. 

MAPC facilitated the work of the Municipal Health Insurance Working Group, which 
drafted and proposed landmark legislation to let cities and towns purchase their health 
insurance through the Group Insurance Commission. 



Collaboration for Safety 

MAPC carries out fiduciary, planning, and project management duties for the Northeast 
Homeland Security Regional Advisory Council (NERAC), a network of 85 cities and 
towns north and west of Boston. In 2006, NERAC distributed more than $1.5 million in 
emergency equipment and supplies to member communities, and trained hundreds of first 
responders in various roles in the United States Department of Homeland Security 
incident command system. 

In 2006, MAPC advanced Pre-Disaster Mitigation (PDM) plans for cities and towns 
throughout the region. These plans are designed to help communities reduce their 
vulnerability to damages due to natural hazards. The plans include an inventory of critical 
facilities and infrastructure in each community, a vulnerability analysis, and a mitigation 
strategy with specific recommended actions and projects that will protect the 
communities from future damages. 
Collaboration for Savings 

MAPC's Consortiums Project administered 37 procurement contracts for 42 municipal 
clients in 2006, saving cities and towns up to 20% on the purchases. As the administrator 
of the more than 300-member Greater Boston Police Council (GBPC), MAPC 

concluded 7 procurement contracts for public safety, public works and general use 
vehicles. In all, 142 municipalities purchased 180 vehicles. MAPC staff also 
collaborated on procurements that advanced MAPC's environmental and transportation 
objectives, helping communities to buy bicycle racks, hybrid vehicles, and water leak 
detection services at a favorable cost. 

Charting a Course to Region wide Prosperity 

MAPC developed its annual Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy 

(CEDS), an assessment of current regional economic trends and conditions. The report 
includes background about trends and conditions in the regional economy, including a 
discussion about the relationship between the economy and factors such as geography, 

73 



population, labor force, resources, and the environment. MAPC's 2006 CEDS report can 

be downloaded at : 

www.mapc.org/economic development/comprehensive economic.html . 

Tools to Improve Planning and Decision-Making 

MAPC's Metro Data Center partnered with The Boston Foundation to develop the 
MetroBoston DataCommon, a new online data and mapping tool for residents and 
leaders in the region. The resource, which helps individuals to create customized maps 
and charts, is available at www.MetroBostonDataCommon.org . The Data Center 
partnered with MAPC's Legislative Committee to advocate for the establishment of a 
statewide population estimates program at the University of Massachusetts Donahue 
Institute. The program, funded at $100,000 in the FY2007 budget, lays the foundation for 
the Commonwealth to analyze Census estimates in a more robust way. 

MAPC's Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Lab provides professional services 
and products and technical assistance in support of local and regional planning projects. 
In 2006, MAPC's GIS team completed extensive projects for the Northeast Homeland 
Security Regional Advisory Council (NERAC) region, and maps associated with the Pre- 
Disaster Mitigation Program, both of which are described above. The GIS Lab also made 
major contributions to the MetroBoston DataCommon and the MetroFuture planning 
project. The Lab also began mapping areas suitable for economic development 
throughout the region, in accordance with smart growth principles. 

In 2006, MAPC transitioned from a paper to an electronic newsletter, the Regional 
Record, which is distributed quarterly, and provides updates on the latest regional 
projects and thinking, and provides opportunities for residents and communities to get 
involved in various events. People interested in receiving the e-newsletter can send their 
e-mail addresses to contactinfo(q)mapc.org . 

On Beacon Hill: 2005 - 2006 Legislative Session 

• Brownfields Redevelopment: 

The Legislature recapitalized the Brownfields Redevelopment Fund with $30 
million, and extended and enhanced the Brownfields Tax Credit so that non-profit 
development projects can raise equity by selling the credit to taxable entities. 

• Expedited Permitting: 

The Legislature passed a law to expedite permitting of commercial/industrial 
developments in "priority development sites" designated by cities and towns. In 
part as a result of MAPC's advocacy, the new law includes funding for technical 
assistance to municipalities, development of a statewide-expedited permitting 
model, and criteria to steer priority development sites toward smart growth 
locations. 



74 



• GIS Data Layer: 

MAPC successfully advocated for $400,000 in the FY2007 budget to update and 
improve the quality of Mass GIS data linking aerial photographs to land uses on 
the ground. 

• Statewide Population Estimates Proeram: 

MAPC led the advocacy effort to establish a statewide population estimates 
program at the University of Massachusetts Donahue Institute. The program was 
funded at $100,000 in the FY2007 budget. 

• Shannon Community Safety Initiative: 

The Legislature created a new $11 million grant program to encourage the 
creation of regional, multi-disciplinary initiatives to combat gang violence, youth 
violence, and substance abuse. 

• Sewer Rate Relief: 

The Legislature included $25 million in the FY2007 budget for water and sewer 
rate relief, which will help lower costs for residential consumers and businesses 
served by sewer districts, including the MWRA. 

• Surplus Land: 

Both the House and Senate passed legislation to reform the state's surplus land 
disposition policy. Both bills included an assignable municipal right of first 
refusal to purchase the parcel at a discount; a professional smart growth review 
for larger parcels; a Surplus Land Coordinating Council to oversee disposition; 
and a municipal share of 10%-25% of proceeds in instances where the municipal 
right of first refusal is not exercised. Unfortunately, the Conference Committee 
did not advance the bill to final passage, but significant progress was made setting 
the foundation for the 2007-08 legislative session. 

Three Rivers Interlocal Council (Canton, Dedham, Dover, Foxborough, Medfleld, 
Milton, Needham, Norwood, Sharon, Stoughton, Walpole, and Westwood) 

In 2006, the Three Rivers Interlocal Council (TRIC) met monthly to discuss issues of 
inter-municipal significance. Participants at TRIC meetings included Local Council 
Representatives, town planners, members of municipal Planning Boards, Town 
Administrators, and Chambers of Commerce. 

TRIC studied and provided comments relating to critical regional transportation issues. 
TRIC's highest priority for the Transportation Improvement Program (TIP) remains the 
speedy completion of the Route 128 Add-a-Lane Project. TRIC also supports the 
proposed Executive Office of Transportation's (EOT) 1-95 South Corridor Study, but has 
suggested that EOT should increase efforts to communicate and coordinate with the 
communities, subregions and other agencies. TRIC's greatest concern remains the lack of 
funding for transportation studies and construction projects throughout the Boston region. 



75 



TRIC membership submitted comments relating to the proposed Westwood Station 
development. Priorities include increasing the frequency and capacity of commuter rail 
service at the station, and further traffic studies in the area. TRIC also emphasized 
support for pedestrian, transit, and bicycle connections between the Route 128 Station 
and Royall Street in Canton, as well as the importance of energy-efficient building design 
within the project. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Marc D. Draisen 
Executive Director, Metropolitan Area Planning Council. 



76 



TRI-COUNTY REGIONAL VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL SCHOOL 

DISTRICT 

ANNUAL REPORT 

2006 

In July, 2006 the School Committee reorganized and elected the following 
officers: Chair, Paul Carbone (Franklin), Vice Chair, Henry McDeed, (North 
Attleboro) and Secretary, Jonathan Dowse, (Sherborn). 

The School Committee conducts its regularly scheduled meetings on the third 
Wednesday of each month at 7:00 P.M. in the Conference Room at the 
school. Sub-committee meetings are scheduled as needed. 

Graduation 

On June 4, 2006, 146 students graduated in an impressive afternoon 
ceremony. Paul Carbone, Chairman of the Tri-County School Committee, 
delivered the welcoming address to more than one thousand guests. Music 
was provided by the Millis High School Band. Jean Mallon, Director of 
Guidance, presented scholarships and awards totaling $95,350 to deserving 
seniors. 

Pupil Personnel Services 

In September 2005, Tri-County welcomed approximately 799 students to the 
new school year. The break out of students from member towns is as follows: 
Franklin 146, Medfield 13, Medway 49 Millis 43, Norfolk 29, North Attleboro 
237, Plainville 80, Seekonk 59, Sherborn 7, Walpole 62, and Wrentham 74. 
Also 52 students were accepted from out-of-district towns. 

During the 2005-2006 school year the Pupil Personnel Department continued 
its programs to provide information to students, parents, sending schools and 
District communities. The Department provided counseling for students 
regarding career pathways and post-secondary education. Safe and Drug 
Free presentations were offered to students school wide. The Guidance 
Department presented programs on preparing for college with the assistance 
of personnel from Dean College. Tri-County hosted Career Days for over 
2,500 Grade 8 students from the Regional District. 

Guidance services have been expanded to include the development of a four 
year career plan for students in grades 9 through 12. 



77 



Academics 

Tn-County's academic program continues to focus on the Massachusetts 
Curriculum Frameworks and successful preparation for the related MCAS 
tests. Our endeavors in this regard reflect a multi-faceted approach, which 
includes professional development for faculty, raising of curriculum standards, 
development of various student support mechanisms, multiple diagnostic 
assessments, and analysis of school-based data. 

We continue to incorporate technology into the instructional environment and 
have expanded our computer labs to three for academic class instruction. 
Various computer programs and computerized devices are being implemented 
in the learning process throughout the academic program area. 

The most exciting academic achievement to occur this year is the continued 
implementation and refinement of the required Senior Project, an integrated 
academic and vocational experience for our seniors. All seniors are required 
to participate. Components included a ten-page research paper; development 
of a product or service, and a twenty minute presentation before a panel of 
judges including a teacher, an administrator and an industry representative. 
All Senior Project components must be completed for a student to graduate. 
True collaboration between the English teachers and the Vocational teachers 
resulted in a deeper learning experience for each student and provided an 
academic focus for seniors throughout their school year. 

In continuing to prepare students for either the work force and/or college Tri- 
County is now offering AP Calculus, AP literature, Psychology, Web Design, 
Introduction to Music Appreciation & Theory, and continues to offer Spanish 
and co-supported classes. With the increase in both academic and 
vocational-technical rigor, Tri-County students are required to pass four years 
of English, Mathematics, and Science; three and a half years of a shop major; 
three years of Social Studies (including 2 years of U.S. History); and three 
years of physical education/health and vocational related. 

Tri-County RVTHS continues to meet Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) and 
1 00% of students in the Class of 2006 passed the MCAS assessment. 

Vocational/Technical Programs 

Collision Repair/Auto Technology: The Auto Shop is responsible for 
maintaining, repairing and servicing all of our school vehicles. We also 
provide services and repairs to the people who reside in Tri-County's district 
towns. The Auto Repair and Auto Body programs are ASE Master Certified 
from the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation. This 
certification is nationally recognized and considered to be the highest 
achievement known in the Automotive Industry. 



78 



Early Childhood Careers: The Early Childhood Careers Program continues to 
attract large numbers of toddlers and pre-school children into its program to 
service the developmental needs of younger members of the Tri-County 
District. 

Cosmetology : The Cosmetology Program continues to thrive as one of this 
school's largest programs. The salon offers a full service schedule and clients 
are welcome. 

Culinary Arts: Gerry's Place and Bakeshop are open to the public for lunch 
during the school year. 

Graphic Arts: Graphic Arts continues to provide printing services to many non- 
profit organizations throughout the Tri-County district. 

Medical Careers: Students in all grades receive training in order to take the 
new state exam to become Certified Nursing Assistants. We are currently 
affiliating with three area nursing homes where students can apply skills of 
patient care and recreational activity. Students also receive basic health care 
knowledge, which enables them to pursue career choices such at EMT, EKG, 
and Medical Assistant. 

Plumbing: Due to ongoing increased enrollment, the Plumbing Program has 
expanded both physically and in the number of faculty members. It continues 
to provide graduates with the necessary skills to become licensed journeymen. 

Electrical The simulated shop job activities and the correlated theory course 
within our Electrical Program prepare our graduate students for the State 
Journeyman examination. 

Carpentry: The Carpentry Program prepares our students for the construction 
trades and provides community service work throughout our district. 

HVACandR: Students in this program receive high level training in this field 
leading to well paying employment or further education. 

CIS: Students in this program garner expertise in the operation of computers, 
software, the internet, etc. Training in such allows for employment 
opportunities in a variety of job fields. 

Facilities Management: Providing a variety of construction related skills, 
students in this program contribute to the maintenance and repair of Tri- 
County and its grounds as they prepare for employment in their field or further 
training for employment in welding and construction industries. 



79 



Electronics: Students in this program prepare for employment through shop 
experiences and excellent cooperative education placements. They also 
receive a solid foundation for further education related to the field of study. 

Engineering Technology: The newest addition to our program offerings, the 
Engineering Technology Program offers a primer for further education in the 
field of Engineering. Subject matter includes significant course work in 
mathematics, physics and other sciences. 

Continuing Education 

The Continuing Education Department at Tri-County offers both day and 
evening courses. The day program includes two course offerings, one for 
cosmetology and the other for licensed practical nursing. The evening 
program consists of approximately 70 different of course offerings. 

Adult Day Cosmetology: The adult day Cosmetology program is a full time 
program that follows the high school calendar and runs from September to 
June. Registration for the program begins in the spring, and details are 
available by contacting the Continuing Education office at Tri-County. 

Licensed Practical Nursing (LPN): The LPN program is a full time day 
program that follows the high school calendar and runs from September to 
June. The practical nursing program at Tri-County is designed to prepare 
graduates to take the National Council Licensure Examination for Practical 
Nurses (NCLEX-PN), which tests for entry-level competency. Successful 
completion of this examination permits practice as a licensed practical nurse. 
Registration for this program requires that prospective students take a Test of 
Essential Academic Skills (TEAS). These tests are administered from October 
to January, and details are available by contacting the LPN office at Tri- 
County. 

Evening Adult Program: The evening adult program at Tri-County consists of 
approximately 70 courses which are offered in fall and spring semesters. 
Registration for these courses takes placed during August and September, for 
the fall semester and in January and February for the spring semester. 
Continuing Education course information can be found in brochures which are 
available to the public via local newspapers or direct mail upon request. The 
evening program information is also included on the Tri-County RVTHS web 
site at http://tri-county.ltc/continuingeducation or by calling the Continuing 
Education office. 



80 



Student Activities 

National Honor Society 

Membership begins in the eleventh and twelfth grades based on the academic 
review commencing third term of sophomore year. Upon meeting the 
scholastic requirements, the National Honor Society Advisor will notify each 
potential Grade 10-12 candidate with directions for completion of a NHS 
Portfolio. This includes evidence of Leadership, Service, Character, three (3) 
letters of recommendation and a personal statement. 

The Peter H. Rickard Chapter of Tri-County is comprised of 15 seniors and 
juniors. During the school year 2005-2006, the group participated in many 
fund-raising and community services both in and out of school. 

It has been the tradition of NHS to host a "Leadership Breakfast" in March, 
honoring students who have shown outstanding achievement during the 
school year. Students organize the event, help with set up in Gerry's Place, 
and cheer on the participants. 

The school year ended with the organization and presentation of Tri-County's 
fifteenth annual Honors Night. NHS students stuffed envelopes, delivered 
letters to students, and helped to set up and distribute awards on this most 
important night. 

Skills USA 

A national professional organization for career and technical student, Skills 
USA provides leadership, citizenship and character development programs 
and activities, as well as opportunities for awards, tools, and scholarships 
through local, district, state, national and even international competitions in 
trade, leadership and demonstration programs. 

Skills USA-VICA emphasizes respect for the dignity of work, quality products 
and services, leadership, and concern for others. Members also learn about 
the democratic process and proper business procedure through the ordinary 
workings of the organization at the local level. In addition, members 
participate in activities, workshops and conferences to develop their job skills 
as well as their personal communications and leadership abilities. Through 
community service projects, they learn the value of service to others as a 
lifetime commitment. 

There were 563 students taking "In House "Competition over two days in 
January. The students competed within their respective career areas. Tri- 
County sent 171 students from these competitions to the District Competitions. 
Of the 171 students sent, 77 qualified to advance to the State Competition. At 
the State Competition, Tri-County received 34 medals. We earned 17 gold, 12 



81 



silver, and 5 bronze. Two of the silver medals were won by students from the 
newly established adult Practical Nursing Program. 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

Student Advisory Committee 

The student body elects five (5) students to membership on the Student 
Advisory Committee. The principal appoints one of these elected members 
who will report student concerns and activities to the Tri-County School 
Committee each month; two (2) students from this group sit on the Tri-County 
School Council; and two (2) serve on the High Schools That Work Site 
Committee. 

The student body chooses two (2) students to represent Tri-County on the 
State Student Advisory Committee. 

These seven (7) students also serve as ex officio members of the Student 
Council. 

Class Officers 

The freshman, sophomore and junior classes will elect a President, Vice- 
President, Secretary, and Treasurer for their respective classes for the 
following school year. The incoming freshman class holds an election for 
class officers no later than the last day of the first academic term. Under the 
supervision of the Class Advisor, officers will schedule, organize and conduct 
monthly after-school meetings of their respective classes, to plan activities and 
hear concerns that they can communicate to the Student Advisory Committee. 
Class officers serve as ex officio members of the Student Council. 

Student Council 

Each class elects four (4) representatives to the Student Council for the 
following year. These students, along with the class officers and the five 
Student Advisory Committee members, will serve as the overall student 
governing body. The group will meet at least bi-weekly after school, and will 
advise the faculty and administration of the day-to-day needs and concerns of 
the student body. Under the supervision of the Student Council Advisor, this 
group is also accountable for conducting and ensuring fair elections for Class 
Officers, the Student Advisory Committee, and the at-large Student Council 
membership. 

In addition, the Student Council plans and coordinates, civic, social, fund- 
raising, and community service activities. 



82 



Open Membership Activities 

There are 10 different open membership activities at Tri-County. They are: 

Chess Club 

Drama Club 

Math Team 

Music Club 

Nontraditional Support Group 

SADD 

Spanish Club 

Teens Against Ignorance/Diversity 

Yearbook 

Summary: 

As we continue to provide for the educational needs of our students, we wish 
to thank District residents for their support and cooperation. In the future we 
intend to maintain the high educational standard that has earned Tri-County 
RVTHS that support. 



83 



MEDFIELD PUBLIC SCHOOLS 



REPORT 
FOR THE YEAR ENDING 

DECEMBER 31, 2006 



84 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

On behalf of the Medfield School Committee, I would like to thank the dedicated 
individuals who make Medfield Public Schools one of the best school systems in the 
commonwealth. As Superintendent, Mr. Maguire, you continue to do a superb job of 
leading a talented group of administrators, teachers and support staff in providing the 
excellence in education that Medfield residents have come to expect. 

With the support of parents and the entire Medfield community, our students continue to 
excel in scholastic achievement as well as in the disciplines of art, music, drama and 
athletics. Medfield continues to develop students who value doing their best and giving 
back to their community in a myriad of ways. 

The past year has been both busy and productive. It was gratifying to shift from focusing 
on the school building projects to using the strategic plan to advance some of the goals of 
the school system. The School Committee was impressed when many of the principals 
used the newly-created strategic plan to help formulate their goals for their schools. 

Seeing the town and the schools fully utilize the new school facilities after many years of 
work was also gratifying. We would like to commend Charlie Kellner for immediately 
working to make our new buildings more energy and cost efficient. 

The School Committee would like to wish Peg Mongiello all the best in her upcoming 
retirement. Her energetic attitude and her ability to develop our middle school students 
into true world citizens will be a lasting legacy to the Town of Medfield. The principal 
search committee was successful in finding her successor, Robert Parga, who will take 
over the helm of the Thomas A. Blake Middle School in July. Thank you to all those that 
participated in the search committee. 

We would like to recognize those on the Field of Dreams committee who made huge 
personal commitments in order to raise private funds for the new turf field at the high 
school. The Medfield Public Schools were proud to accept this $630,000 donation on the 
behalf of the Town of Medfield. Thank you, Tim Nugent, Mike Festa, Steve McCormick 
and all those who contributed to the field project for being so generous. In tight 
budgetary times, stepping up to provide such important support to the community is truly 
appreciated. There are currently private funding initiatives being conducted to raise 
funds for a new piano as well as a portion of the funds needed to resurface the track. 
Medfield Public Schools continues to benefit from dedicated and involved citizens. 

The School Committee passed a budget of $23,685,575 for FY07 that represented an 
8.83% increase over FY06. Medfield continues to operate a very efficient school system. 
Medfield is in the bottom 7.5% of cities and towns in per pupil spending. Medfield's 



85 



FY05 (the most recent year for which there is comparable data) per pupil spending of 
$7,195 was about 20% below the state average. While state per pupil spending grew 
about 5.21% annually statewide from FY99 to FY05, Medfield grew about 4.41% 
annually during the same time period. Our increased enrollment has given us modest 
funding increases over the last several years but these relatively small amounts do not 
address the bigger issue, that of inadequate and inequitable funding to cities and towns 
through Chapter 70 aid. We will continue as a committee to lobby our representatives and 
senator for changes in the way education is funded in the state. While we are proud of 
our successful and efficient system, we are mindful of the stresses that the system 
endures due to inadequate state funding. 

I would like to thank my fellow school committee members, Tim Bonfatti, Carolyn 
Casey, Debbie Noschese and Susan Ruzzo for volunteering their time and expertise to the 
Town of Medfield in this important public service role. I would especially like to thank 
Steven Kramer who retired from the school committee this year after serving 9 years. 
Steve always carefully considered how school committee decisions would affect not only 
those in the school system but all members of the Medfield community. 

As a result of all the efforts of the entire community, Medfield enjoys one of the best 
school systems in the state. 



Respectfully Submitted, 

Susan Cotter 

Medfield School Committee 



86 



MEDFIELD PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

Enrollment Figures 
As of October 1,2006 



Memorial School 




Kindergarten: 
Grade 1 : 


203 
220 


Ralph Wheelock School 


L 


Grade 2: 
Grade 3: 


238 
248 


Dale Street School 




Grade 4: 
Grade 5: 


220 
263 


Thomas A. Blake Middle School 


Grade 6: 
Grade 7: 
Grade 8: 


254 
237 
247 


Unos Clark Kingsbury High J 


Schoc 


Grade 9: 
Grade 10: 
Grade 11: 
Grade 12: 


213 

223 
213 
242 



TOTAL: 3021 



87 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

To the Citizens of Medfield: 

1 am pleased to submit the annual report for the Medfield Public Schools for the year 
2006. 

The appropriated budget for FY 2007 was $23,685,575. This figure represents an 
increase of 8.83% over the FY 2006 appropriation. To achieve this level of funding we 
worked cooperatively with other town departments to support a request for a proposition 

2 Vi override. 

The October 1, 2006 enrollment was 3021 students. The enrollment by school was: 
Memorial School - 423, Wheelock School - 486, Dale Street School - 483, Blake 
Middle School - 738 and High School -891. 

During 2006 all major construction on the High School and Middle School was 
completed. The Permanent School Planning and Building Committee continued to meet 
throughout the year to complete minor repairs and "punch list" work. I would like to once 
again acknowledge the hard work and commitment of the dedicated volunteers that serve 
on this committee. 

The 2006 school year marked transitions of leadership in the school district. Ms. Barbara 
Levine who served as principal at the Memorial School for the past five years announced 
her resignation for the purpose of retirement. After conducting a search for a new 
principal, Ms. Andrea Trasher was appointed to fill the position effective July 1, 2006. In 
addition, Ms. Margaret Mongiello announced her resignation for the purpose of 
retirement effective June 30, 2007. Ms. Mongiello has served as the principal of the 
Blake Middle School for the past ten years. Mr. Robert Parga was appointed in December 
to be the new Blake principal effective July 1, 2006. Both of these administrators have 
had a profound effect on their respective schools over their tenures and will be greatly 
missed. I would like to thank them for their service and commitment to the children of 
Medfield and I wish them both the very best in their retirements. 

During the year we continued to make significant progress on a number of important 
curricular and instructional goals. We have continued a focus on improving literacy 
instruction across the district. Many staff from each of the schools participated in high 
quality professional development in the area of writing instruction. A Writer's Workshop 
Model of coordinated and sequential instructional practices is currently being 
implemented at each elementary school. In addition, we have continued improvements in 
our mathematics instructional program at the elementary schools through the acquisition 
and use of new materials and staff training. 



88 



In the fall of 2006 we made some significant changes to our Community Education 
programs. Programs in the area of intramural offerings for students were expanded to the 
high school. In addition, Fun and Fitness offerings were expanded at the Memorial and 
Wheelock Schools. Day care offerings at the elementary level were incorporated under 
the public schools and expanded to provide more availability for working parents. Plans 
have also been developed to significantly expand the summer programming and camp 
offerings that will be available in 2007. 

In closing, I would like to express my appreciation to all of the citizens of Medfield for 
their strong support of our educational programs. I would also like to extend my 
appreciation to all of the teachers, parents, support staff, administrators, school 
committee members and volunteers who continue to actively support our educational 
mission. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert C. Maguire 
Superintendent 



89 



MEDFIELD PUBLIC SCHOOLS 



STAFF DIRECTORY 



* * * * * 



Year Ending 12/31/06 



CENTRAL OFFICE 



Maguire, Robert, BA,MEd 
Kellner, Charles,BA,MBA 
Leader, Kathleen 
Bennotti, Beverly 
Cahill, Cynthia 
Floser, Anna 
Hirtle, Patricia 
Kavanaugh, Mary 
Shufro, Pamela, BA,MA,EdD 
Sullivan, Colleen 



Superintendent of Schools 
Director/ Finance & Operations 
Administrative Assistant to Superintendent 
Secretary to the Superintendent 
Secretary to Dir/Curriculum & Assessment 
Secretary to Dir/Finance & Operations 
Accounts Payable/Bookkeeper 
Payroll Officer 

Director, Curriculum & Assessment 
Mail Transfer 



90 



MEDFIELD HIGH SCHOOL 



Name 



Position 



Education 



Medfield 
Appointment 



Keough, Andrew 


Principal 


Sperling, Jeffrey 


Dn/Students 


Nunes, Kathleen 


Dn/Academics 


Davidson, Sandra 
Ingram, Maryjean 
Boyer, Laura 
Ballou, Katherine 


Secretary 
Secretary 
Secretary 
Science 


Batts, Maura 


Foreign Lang 


Berry, Orla 


Science 


Blessington, Patricia 


Business 


Brophy, Kathleen 


Wellness 


Bruemmer, Paul 


Foreign Lang 


Chamberlain, Amanda 
Cherner, Matthew 


Science 
Wellness/Trnr 


Chilson, Christina 
Cochrane, James 


Social Studies 
Mathematics 


Cousens, James 


Art 


Coutinho, Paul 


Wellness/PE 


Cowell, Susan 


Wellness 


Curran, Jane 
Cushing, Gerald 


Library Assistant 
Science 


Delery, Andrew 


Mathematics 


DeSorgher, Richard 


Social Studies 



BA, Roger Williams College 

MSped, MArt, Framingham State College 

PhD, Boston College 

BS, Bridgewater State College 

MA, Lesley University 

MEd, Endicott College 

BA, Framingham State College 

MA. Boston College 

MEdAdmin, University of MA, Boston 



BS, Stonehill College 

MS, Boston College 

BA, Middlebury College 

MEd, University of Massachusetts 

BS,USG,MEd, University of 

Massachusetts,Boston 

BS, California State,Long Beach 

MA, Cambridge College 

AB, Boston College 

MEd, Cambridge College 

BA, St. Mary's University of MN 

MA, University of St. Thomas 

BS, Fairfield University 

BS, University of New England 

MS, California University of Pennsylvania 

BA, Hobart & William Smith Colleges 

BA, Boston College 

MBA, Dartmouth College 

MEd, Harvard University 

BFA, University of Massachusetts, 

Dartmouth 
MEd, Fitchburg State College 
BS, Southern Connecticut State 

University 
MS, Northeastern University 
BS, Springfield College 
MEd, Cambridge College 

BS, Lowell Technological Institute 

MS, Lehigh University 

BA, Providence College 

MEd, Bridgewater State College 

BA, University of Mass, Amherst 

MA, University of Mass,Boston 



2003 

2005 

2001 

1988 
1999 
2000 
2004 

1993 

2004 

1998 

2001 

2001 

2006 
2006 

2006 
2004 

2006 

2002 

1984 

2004 
2006 

2001 

1976 



91 



Name 



Position 



Education 



Medfield 
Appointment 



Drew, Meghan 


Art 


Duffy, Gail 


English 


Dugan, Ellen 
Dunn, Jonathan 
Emerson, Kathleen 


English 
Mathematics 
Social Studies 


Fantelli, Lynn 


Science 


Faoro, Jessica 


English 


Flanagan, Jacqueline 


Math 


Gait, Luanne 


Mathematics 


Garcia-Rangel, Mary 


English 


Goodrow, Monique 


Foreign Lang 


Goss, Anne 
Hamilton, Barbara 


Library Asistant 
Science 


Hardy, Adele 
Hawkins, Eileen 


Consumer & 
Family Science 
Foreign Lang 


Heller, David 


Writing Center 


Irwin, Ross 


Mathematics 


Jones, Kate 
Joseph, Vincent 


Art 

Social Studies 


Kinch, Terry 
Kirby Jonathan 


Science Tech/ 

Computers 

Wellness/AD 


Kraemer, Michael 


Mathematics 


Kramer, David 


Mathematics 


Kryzanek, Carol 


Science 


Lyon, Diane 
Malchodie, Anne 
Mandosa, Frank 


Mathematics 

English 

English 



BA, Sacred Heart University 2003 

MFA, Boston University 

BA, Stonehill College 2001 

MAT, Bridgewater State College 

MSPC, Clark University 

BA, Mt. St. Mary College 1 987 

BA, James Madison University 2004 

BA, Providence College 2001 

MAT, Simmons College 

BS, University of Mass,North Dartmouth 2006 

MEd, Northeastern University 

BA, University of New Hampshire 2003 

MA, University of Mass,Boston 

BS, Boston University 1997 

MS, Suffolk University 

BA, Boston College 1999 

MEd, Cambridge College 

BA, University of MA, Boston 2000 

MAT, Tufts University 

BA,SUNY/Binghamton 2004 

MST,SUNY/Plattsburg 

1998 

BA, Wheaton College 1986 
MEd, Cambridge College 

BS, Framingham State College 1 98 1 

BA, University of Maryland 2003 

MAT, Boston University 

BA, University of California, Santa Cruz 2000 

MA, Emerson College 

BEd, Leeds University, England 1992 

MEd, Cambridge College 

BFA, Massachusetts College of Art 2003 

BS, University of Bridgeport 1 990 

MS, Fitchburg State College 

BS, SUNY at Brockport 1994 

BS, University of Bridgeport 1 977 

MS, Cambridge College 

BA, College of the Holy Cross 1 993 

MAT, Bridgewater State College 

MME, Worcester Polytechnic Institute 

BS, BA, Georgetown University 2004 

JD, Boston College Law School 

B A, Bridgewater State College 1988 

MA, University of Massachusetts 

BS, University of Massachusetts 2006 

BA, Boston College 2004 

BA, St. Anselm College 2002 

MEd, Cambridge College 



92 



Medfield 



Name 


Position 


Education 


Appointment 


McCrossan, Kathleen 


Library Assistant 


2005 


McDermott, Janet 


English 


BA, Regis College 
MAT, Boston College 


1971 


McLain, Lynne 


Science(LOA) 


BS,MST, Boston College 


1999 


Monroe, Aileen 


English 


BA, Nazareth College 
of Rochester 


2002 


Morin, Donna 


Foreign Lang 


BA, College of New Rochelle 


2003 


Morin, Thomas 


Social Studies 


BA, Colgate University 


2005 


Motley, Nancy 


Library Assistant 


2006 


Mullaney, Erica 


Library Assistant 


2006 


Nelson, Heather 


Wellness 


BS, Westfield State College 


2006 


Nickerson, Mark 


Social Studies 


BA, Gettysburg College 

MEd, Framingham State College 


1995 


Noble, Judith 


Science 


BS, University of NH 

MEd, Worcester State College 


1974 


Olsen, Douglas 


Dir. of Music 


BMusic, University of Massachusetts 
Masters, New England Conservatory 


1993 


Panciocco, John 


Soc.Studies,TV 


BS, University of Maine 
MEd, Cambridge College 


1998 


Perm, Mark 


Social Studies 


BA, Mt. Ida College 
MEd, Harvard University 


2001 


Power, Christine 


Social Studies 


BA, University of Massachusetts 
MEd, Harvard University 


1997 


Pratt, Suzanne 


Science 


BS, University of Massachusetts 
MS, Central Connecticut State College 


1971 


Rao, Shuchita 


Technology 


Bachelors, Osmania University, India 


2006 




Business 


Masters, Central University, India 




Rodenhi, Sarah 


Foreign Lang 


BA, Bowdein College 
Masters, Middlebury College 


2000 


Ruggaber, Gordon 


Science 


BS, Clarkson University 
MS, Syracuse University 
PhD, MIT 


2003 


Sabra, Ann Marie 


English 


BA, Worcester State College 
MEd, Framingham State College 


1995 


Safer, Jessica 


Mathematics 


BA, Assumption College 


2002 


Salka, Martin 


Permanent Substitute/Lunchroom Assistant 


2002 


Schmidt, Joanne 


Librarian 


BS, Framingham State College 
MLS, Simmons College 
MA, Emerson College 


2000 


Seri, Leora 


Foreign Lang 


BA, Bates College 


2006 


Shapiro, Richard 


Science 


BS, Worcester Polytechnic Institute 
MS, Northeastern University 


1981 


Stockbridge, Gary 


Social Studies 


BA, Framingham State 
MEd, Cambridge College 


1970 


Tasi, Tracy 


Foreign Lang. 


BA, Boston College 


2002 


Tobiasson, Susan 


Art 


AA, Lasell College 

BA, Southern Connecticut State University 


1989 


Toubman, Ellen 


Foreign Lang. 


BA, Connecticut College 
MEd, Harvard University 


2002 



93 



Name 



Position 



Education 



Medfield 
A ppointment 



Tufel, Melinda 

Whitmore, Miranda 

Wiese, Elizabeth 

Woods, Jane 
Wren-Burgess, Bonnie 



Social Studies 

English 

English 

Mathematics 
English 



BA, University of Massachusetts 2006 

MEd, University of Massachusetts 

BA, Williams College 2004 

MEd, Harvard University 

BA, University of Kentucky 2006 

MAT, Boston University 

BA, MAT Bridgewater State College 1 996 

BA, Boston University 2003 

MAT, Simmons College 



94 



THOMAS A. BLAKE MIDDLE SCHOOL 









Medfield 


Name 


Position 


Education 


Appointment 


Mongiello, Margaret 


Principal 


BS,MA, Bowling Green State U. 


1997 


Vaughn, Nathaniel 


Dean of Students 


BA, Trinity College 
MEd, Lesley College 
MEd, Endicott College 


1998 


McHugh, Elizabeth 


Secretary 




1998 


Skerry, Sharon 


Secretary 




2001 


O'Shaughnessy 


Secretary 




2006 


Ambrose, Mary 


English 


BS, University of Connecticut 


2004 






MAT,National-Louis University/IL 


Ammon, Robert 


Science 


BS,MEd, East Stroudsburg State 


2006 


Ayers, Sandra 


English 


BS, MEd, Boston State College 


1995 


Borek, Matthew 


Music 


BM, Ithaca College 
MA, Boston College 


2006 


Boucher, Richard 


Network Administrator 




1997 


Brackett, Kenneth 


Physical Education 


BS,Westfield State 


1997 


Buckham, Eileen 


Foreign Language 


BA,MAT, Boston University 


2006 


Buckley, Susan 


Library Assistant(LOA) 




1998 


Carney, Marjorie 


Science 


BA,MEd, University of MA 


2006 


Cohen, Wendy 


Science 


BS, Simmons College 


1988 


Coyle, Adam 


Social Studies 


BA, George Washington Univ 


2006 


Craig, Kathleen 


Mathematics 


BA, Webster College 
MA, Cambridge College 


1981 


Dalpe, Cynthia 


Foreign Language 


BA, Worcester State College 
MEd, Cambridge College 


1986 


Delaney, Christina 


Art 


BFA, Massachusetts College of Art 2005 


Demeritt, Deborah 


Science 


BS, University of Connecticut 
Masters, Cambridge College 


1974 


Dengos, Kelly 


Science 


BA,MA, Marist College 


2005 


Dexter, Ryan 


Music/Band 


Bachelor of Music,University 
of Massachusetts 


2000 


Doolan, Constance 


Mathematics 


BS, Bradley University 
MEd, Cambridge College 


2004 


Farroba, Joseph 


Health/PE 


BS, Boston State College 
MEd, Cambridge College 


1978 


Fell, Sara 


Mathematics 


BA, Wheaton College 
MA, Simmons College 


2005 


Gagne, Ian 


English 


BS, Boston University 


2000 


Gantos, Alex 


Science 


BFA, Tufts University 
MAT, Simmons College 


2006 


Gonzalez, Heather 


Foreign Language 


BA, Oberlin College 


2004 


Gow, Michael 


Social Studies 


BS, University of Wisconsin 


2001 


Guarino, Veronique 


Foreign Language 


B A, University of Mass/Amherst 


2004 


Guditis, Steve 


Social Studies 


BA, Hamilton College 
MEd, Harvard Graduate School 
of Education 


2002 



95 



Medfield 



Name 


Position 


Education 


Appointment 


Gumas, Marissa 


Mathematics 


BA, Arcadia University 
MEd, Lesley University 


2001 


Haycock, Jonathan 


Librarian 


BS, MEd, Boston University 


1998 


Heim, Jason 


Science 


BS, SUNY, Albany 
MAT, Simmons College 


2002 


Hellerstein, Seth 


Social Studies 


BA, Beloit College 
MEd, University of VT 
CAS, Trinity College, VT 


1999 


Hoffman, Janice 


English 


BA, Emmanuel College 
MA,University of Madrid, Spain 


1973 


Ibrahim, Susan 


Foreign Language 


BS, Boston University 
MEd,Boston College 


2001 


Jalkut, Maryann 


Rdng/Soc. Studies 


BS, Framingham State College 


1987 


Kirby, Ann 


Mathematics 


BA, MEd, Boston College 


2003 


Lombardi, Patricia 


Mathematics 


BA, St. Mary's College 

MS, University of Notre Dame 


1994 


Manning, Deborah 


Social Studies 


BA, Hamilton College 
MEd, Lesley University 


2002 


Manning, Kristin 


Foreign Language 


BA, University of Vermont 
MAT, Quinnipiac College 


2003 


McConnell, Ellen 


English 


BA, Marymount College 
MA, Northeastern University 


1992 


Meaney, Donna 


Technology Assistant 




1993 


Millard, Matthew 


Mathematics 


BS, Gordon College 


2005 


Miller, Martha 


English/LA 


BA, Framingham State College 
MEd, State College at Boston 


1988 


Nelson, Carol 


English 


BA, University of Massachusetts 
MA, Boston College 


1978 


Nixon, Sarah 


Library Assistant 




2006 


O'Neil, Joyce 


Physical Education 


BS, University of Wisconsin 


1993 


Parsons, John 


Science/Reading 


BA, College of Wooster 

BS, Framingham State College 

MEd, Cambridge College 


1998 


Porter-Fahey, Loretta 


Health Education 


BS, University of Maine 
MS, Cambridge College 


1980 


Potts, Eva 


Consumer & Family 


BS, UCLA 


2000 




Science 


MEd, Framingham State 




Rabinowitz, Kristen 


English 


BA, University of New Hampshire 
MAT, Simmons College 


: 2003 


Russell, Ellen 


Technology Assistant 




2001 


Shiff, Mary 


Art 


BFA, Massachusetts College of 

Art 
BA, University of Rhode Island 


1996 


Silva, Judith 


Science 


2006 


Sperling, Keri 


Mathematics 


BA, Bridgewater State College 
MEd, Lesley University 


2000 


Standring, Nancy 


Library Assistant 




1992 


Stow, Anne 


Reading 


BS, Boston University 
MEd, Lesley University 


2006 


Sullivan, John 


Social Studies 


BA,MA, Northeastern University 


2004 


Sullivan, Wendy 


Technology Assistant 




2002 



96 



Medfield 

Name Position Education Appointment 

Taliaferro, Travis Social Studies BA,MEd, Plymouth State College 2001 

Tasker, Geraldine Social Studies BA, Our Lady of the Elms College 1986 

MEd, Lesley College 
Tatarka, Nicholas Orchestra Bachelor of Music, Boston 2006 

University 
Walker, Doris English BA, University of Maine 1987 

MAT, Bridgewater State College 
Wroten, Theresa Music/Chorus Bachelor of Music 2000 

Boston Conservatory 
Zaia, Diane Science AS, Westbrook College 1995 

BS, Northeastern University 

MS, University of Rhode Island 



97 



DALE STREET SCHOOL 









Medfield 


Name 


Position 


Education 


Appointment 


Cave, Kim 


Principal 


BS, Framingham State 
MS, Boston University 


1987 


Moon, Martha 


Secretary 




1992 


Englehardt, Nancy 


Secretary 




1997 


Abner, Deborah 


Librarian 


BFA, College of New Rochelle 
MA, University of Louisville 
MS, Simmons College 


2004 


Belmont, Katherine 


Grade 4 


BS, Framingham State College 


1971 


Burnham, Elizabeth 


Grade 4 


BA, University of Maine 
MAT, Simmons College 


1999 


Carey, Pauline 


Health 


BS, Springfield College 
MEd, Cambridge College 


1992 


Cauldwell, Mary 


Reading 


BS, Bridgewater State College 
MEd, Framingham State College 


1974 


Cook, Lynne 


Grade 4 


BS, Springfield College 
MEd, Lesley University 


1999 


Crable, Heidi 


Grade 5 


BS, University of Maine 


1994 


Curran, Kathleen 


Grade 4 


BS, University of Mass/Amherst 
MBA, Northeastern University 


2000 


Deveno, Nancy 


Art 


BSA, Mass. College of Art 
MSAE,Mass. College of Art 


1993 


Dixon, Emily 


Grade 5(LOA) 


BA, Holy Cross 
MEd,Lesley University 


2000 


Dodge, Maureen 


Grade 4 


BA, Sonoma State University 
MEd, National University 


2004 


Douglas, Michael 


Grade 4 


BS, Stonehill College 
MEd, Cambridge College 


1995 


Fromen, Deborah 


Technology Assistant 




2001 


Harrington, Lauren 


Grade 4 


BA, Notre Dame College 


1967 


Harris, Elizabeth 


Lunchroom Assistant 




1997 


Kristof, Ann 


Grade 4 


BS, Framingham State College 


1974 


Leach, Kerry 


Grade 5 


BA, Bridgewater State College 


2002 


Loof, Melinda 


Library/Media 


BA, University of New Hampshire 
MS, Simmons College 


2006 


Lowere, Julie 


Grade 5 


BS, Indiana State University 


2004 


Mason, Michael 


Grade 5 


BS, Northeastern University 


1989 






MEd, Bridgewater State University 


McKechnie, Claire 


Grade 5 


BA, Boston College 
MEd, Cambridge College 


1977 


Nelson, Laura 


Grade 5 


BA, University of Massachsuetts 
MEd, Cambridge College 


1972 


Olson, Janice 


Grade 4 


BS, Boston State College 


1973 


O'Rourke, Joanne 


Lunchroom Assistant 




2005 


Oxholm, Barbara 


Music 


BM, University of Lowell 


1999 



MM, New England Conservatory 



98 



Name 



Position 



Education 



Medfield 
Appointment 



Pendleton, Anne Reading BS, University of Southern Maine 1995 

MA, University of Lowell 

Pope, William Physical Education Associate, Dean College 1977 

BS, Springfield College 

Porro, Shannon Grade 5 BS, MEd, Northeastern University 2003 

Ramos, Beth Grade 4 BA, Boston College 2001 

MEd, Framingham State College 

Reynolds, Mairi Physical Education BS, Boston University 2001 

Sager, Bethany Grade 5 BA, Mount Holyoke College 1996 

MEd, Framingham State College 

Scollins, Suzanne Grade 5 BA, Merrimack College 2006 

Thornton, Maria Library Assistant 2004 

Walunas, Kathy Grade 5 BA, Boston College 1991 

White, Joseph Grade 5 BS, Northeastern University 1992 

MEd, University of Massachusetts 

Woodman, Susan Grade 5 BA, Boston University 1993 



99 



RALPH WHEELOCK SCHOOL 



Name 



Position 



Education 



Medfield 
Appointment 



Gorman, Patty 


Principal 


BA, Westfield State College 
MA, Wheelock College 
CAGS, Emmanuel College 


2004 


Naughton, Karen 


Secretary 




1985 


Monahan, Luanne 


Secretary 




2002 


Appleyard, Cynthia 


Grade 2 


BA, University of Vermont 


2005 


$ 




MA, Lesley University 




Balardini, Stacey 


Grade 2 


BA, Providence College 
MS, Wheelock College 


2006 


Bonney, Doug 


Grade 2 


BS,BA, Suffolk University 
MA, University of Mass/Boston 


2005 


Braverman, Nancy 


Math Assistant/Lunchroom Assistant 


2004 


Busconi, Elizabeth 


Grade 2 


AB, Boston University 

MEd, Framingham State College 


1984 


Carey, Ann 


Grade 2 


BSEd, Framingham State College 


1971 


Dowd, Emily 


Grade 3 


BS, Plymouth State University 


2006 


Dunlea, Cheryl 


Grade 3 


BA, Boston College 


1986 


Featherman, Nancy 


Grade 2 


BA, University of Massachsuetts 
MEd, Lesley College 


1972 


Ferland, Kelly 


Grade 3 


BS, Westfield State College 
MEd, Lesley University 


2006 


Fine, Madeline 


Art 


BA, University of Massachusetts 


2001 


Flynn, Deborah 


Grade 3 


BA, MAT, Quinnipiac University 


2006 


Frewald, Dorothy 


Technology Assistant/Library Assis tant 


1993 


Gerondeau-Duffy, Jean 


Reading 


BS, Boston College 
MEd, Rutgers University 


2006 


Grant, Ann 


Grade 2 


BA, University of Massachusetts 


1993 


Harlow, Kathleen 


Grade 3 


BA, Stonehill College 
MS, Wheelock College 


2001 


Interrante, Janice 


Grade 3 


BA, Marywood University 


1986 


Kuehl, James 


Grade 3 


BA, University of Arizona 
MAT, Simmons College 


1997 


Larensen, Cynthia 


Grade 3 


BS, Springfield College 
MEd, Lesley College 


1970 


Leonard, Joan 


Grade 2 


BA, Boston College 
MEd, Lesley University 


2002 


Lynch, Noelle 


Grade 2 


BA, Boston College 

MEd, University of Mass/Boston 


2001 


Lynn, Rachel 


Grade 3(LOA) 


BS, North Adams State College 


1997 






M,SpecEd, Framingham State College 


Marsette, Elizabeth 


Grade 2(LOA) 


BA, Hamilton College 
MEd, Boston College 


2001 


McCabe, Karen 


Health 


BS, Purdue University 


1996 






MEd, Bridgewater State University 



100 









Medfield 


Name 


Position 


Education 


Appointment 


Morris, Regina 


Grade 2 


BS, MEd, Framingham State 


1976 


Murphy, Sarah 


Grade 2 


BS, Framingham State College 


2006 


Myers, Judith 


Reading 


BA, Clark University 

MS, Long Island University 


1998 


Newton, Debra 


Grade 3(LOA) 


BA, MEd, University of New 
Hampshire 


1996 


Parmenter, Dorothy 


Music 


BA, Marymount College 
MEd, Lesley College 


1978 


Pope, Susan 


Librarian 


BA, University of Vermont 
MLS, University of Illinois 


1979 


Sheehan, Nicole 


Grade 3 


BSEd,Bridgewater State College 
MSEd, Wheelock College 


1994 


Slason, Michael 


Physical Education 


BA, New Mexico Highlands Univ. 


1986 


Stevens, Nicholas 


Physical Education 


BS, Springfield College 
MEd, Cambridge College 


1995 


Sullivan, Nicole 


Grade 2 


BA, University of Rochester 
MEd, Boston University 


2001 


Watson, Erin 


Grade 3 


BA, University of New Hampshire 1995 






MEd, Lesley College 




Wile, Jacqueline 


Reading Assistant 




1999 



101 



MEMORIAL SCHOOL 









Medfield 


Name 


Position 


Education 


Appointment 


Trasher, Andrea 


Principal 


BSBusAdmin, Northeastern 

University 
MEd, Bridgewater State College 


1994 






Administrator Certification, Northeastern 






University 




Driscoll, Marcia 


Secretary 




1989 


Policella, Lynn 


Secretary 




1998 


Callahan, Jamee 


Grade 1 


BS, Framingham State College 


2003 


Colantoni, Juliana 


Grade 1 


BS, Wheelock College 
MEd, Lesley University 


1991 


Cooney, Susan 


Reading 


BA, Tufts University 
MA, Simmons College 
MS, Wheelock College 


2001 


Cronin, Susan 


Teacher Assistant 




2000 


Crowell, Deirdre 


Teacher Assistant 




2004 


DiMarzo, Barbara 


Grade 1 


BS, Boston State College 
MA, Lesley College 


1990 


Dragotakes, Donna 


Teacher Assistant 




2004 


Elrick, Stefanie 


Grade 1 


BA, Assumption College 
MA, Simmons College 


2003 


Estes, Kimberly 


Teacher Assistant 




2001 


Grace, Herbert 


Physical Education 


BS, Keene State College 
MA, Cambridge College 


1992 


Graham, Karen 


Physical Education 


BS, Boston University 


1989 


Green, Susan 


Kindergarten 


BA, University of Massachusetts 


1991 


Groden, Randie 


Librarian 


BA, University of Maryland 
MLS, Rutgers University 


2001 


Guilbert, Alison 


Grade 1 


BS, University of Vermont200 1 
MEd, Lesley University 




Guilmette, Gail 


Kindergarten 


BA, Our Lady of the Elms College 


: 1988 


Hayes, Margot 


Grade 1 


BS, Bridgewater State College 


2006 


Hedberg, Marie 


Kindergarten 


BA, Boston College 
MEd, Lesley College 


1999 


Herring, Heather 


Grade 1 


BA, Assumption College 
MA, Lesley University 


2001 


Jones, Deborah 


Teacher Assistant 




1999 


Kramer, Erica 


Library Assistant 




2005 


Maalouf, Raymonde 


Teacher Assistant 




1998 


Matson, Kathryn 


Technology Assistant 




1997 


McAvoy, Susan 


Kindergarten 


BS, MA, Framingham State 
College 


2000 


McNicholas, Maura 


Teacher Assistant 




1998 


Mulock, Louise 


Teacher Assistant 




2000 


Nicholson, Margaret 


Grade 1 


BA, Newton College of the 


1978 



Sacred Heart 
MEd, Lesley College 



102 



Medfield 



Name 


Position 


Education 


Appointment 


Nickerson, Jeninne 


Kindergarten 


BS, Bridgewater State 


1998 


O'Brien, Teri 


Instructional Technology 


BA, National College of the 

Sacred Heart 
MEd, Northeastern University 


1984 


' Connor-Fischer 


Teacher Assistant 




2003 


Oppel, Heidi 


Teacher Assistant 




1998 


Paget, Christine 


Grade 1 


BA, Framingham State College 
MEd, Lesley University 


1990 


Pendergast, Marie 


Grade 1 


BA, University of MA 
MEd, University of MA 
MSpEd,Framingham State College 


1998 


Pollock, Allison 


Grade 1 


BA, University of Vermont 
MEd, Lesley College 


1992 


Ravinski, Kathleen 


Grade 1 


BA, Wheaton College 
MAT, Simmons College 


2001 


Reardon, Suzanne 


Reading Assistant 




2002 


Roman, Jennifer 


Kindergarten 


BA, Smith College 
MEd, Boston College 


2003 


Ruggiero, David 


Music 


BS, Bryant College 
MEd, Lesley University 


2002 


Singer, Laura 


Reading 


BS, St. Bonaventure University 
MS, University of Bridgeport 


1990 



103 



PUPIL SERVICES 



Name 



Position 



Education 



Medfield 
Appointment 



McArdle, Kathleen 


Director 


Lowd, Diane 


Secretary 


Mitchell, Kim 


Secretary 


Birkett, Janet 


Secretary 


Moores, Andrea 


Secretary 


Allen, Tracy 


Guidance 


Anelauskas, Mary 


Teacher Assistant 


Berkowitz, Sara 


Teacher Assistant 


Bernard, Michele 


Teacher Assistant 


Biedrzycki, Kathleen 


Teacher Assistant 


Bockhorst, Kathleen 


Guidance 


Bosh, Maryellen 


Psychologist 


Brown, Judith 


Teacher Assistant 


Brown, Michelle 


Teacher Assistant 


Carlson, Heather 


Teacher Assistant 


Chen, Joy 


Occupational Therapist 


Chlebda, Kanee 


Teacher Assistant 


Connelly, Janet 


Nurse 


Corey, Suzanne 


Teacher Assistant 


Cullen, Catherine 


Teacher Assistant 


Curry, Amy 


Teacher Assistant 


DeGeorge, Sally 


Integrated Preschool 


Dauphinee, Christian 


Teacher Assistant 


Donalds, Elizabeth 


Psychologist 


Dunn, Jean 


Teacher Assistant 


Findley, Stephanie 


Guidance 


Foley, Marie 


Guidance 


Frauenberger, Gretchen 


School Physician 


Fuglestad, Joanne 


Teacher Assistant 


Ghantous, Carolyn 


Teacher Assistant 


Gavaghan, Brian 


Teacher Assistant 


Giggi, Gail 


Teacher Assistant 


Gordon, Beverly 


Learning Specialist 


Grace, Paula 


Teacher Assistant 


Gross, Susan 


Learning Specialist 



BS, Fitchburg State College 
MS, Simmons College 
MBA, Boston University 



1995 



BA, Vassar College 
MA, Boston College 



BA, Bates College 
MA, Boston College 
BA, St. Anselm College 
MA, Tufts University 



BA, Oberlin College 
MS, Boston University 

BS, St. Anselm College 



1998 
2000 
2000 
2004 
2004 

1998 
2005 
2003 
2006 
2004 

1998 

1992 
2006 
2006 
1994 

2006 

2006 
2005 
2005 
2006 
BS,SUNY/Genesco 2004 

MSEd, Boston College 

2006 
BFA, University of Colorado 2000 

MS,CAGS, Northeastern University 

2000 
BS, MEd, Springfield College 2006 

BS, Curry College 2005 

MEd, University of Massachusetts 
CAGS, University of Mass,Boston 

1999 
2001 
2006 
2005 
BA, Pottsdam State University 1993 
MSEd, The College of St. Rose 

BA, Colgate University 

MEd, Framingham State College 



2004 
2003 



104 









Medfield 


Name 


Position 


Education 


Appointment 


Guglietta, Maureen 


Teacher Assistant 




1987 


Hersey, Janet 


Teacher Assistant 




2006 


Hevey, Sarah 


Learning Specialist 


BA, Merrimack College 
MEd, Lesley University 


2006 


Imbrogna, Ann 


Integrated Kindergarten 


BS, North Adams State College 
MEd, Bridgewater State College 


2005 


Jacomme, Cori 


Psychology 


BS, University of Washington 
MS, University of Rhode Island 


2005 


Johnson, Susan 


Learning Specialist 


BA, Northwestern University 
MEd, Boston University 
JD, Suffolk University 


2002 


Karg, Cynthia 


Teacher Assistant 




2006 


Kennally, Suzanne 


Teacher Assistant 




2005 


Klimchuk, Karina 


Teacher Assistant 




2006 


Krah, Kerrie 


Speech/Language 


BS, Marquette University 
Master of Arts, Hofstra University 


2000 


Lavallee, Susan 


Learning Specialist 


BS, Lesley College 


2002 


Lavelle, Patricia 


Speech/ Language 


BA, Marywood College 
MEd, Northeastern University 


1994 


Laverdiere, Patrice 


Teacher Assistant 




2005 


Lima, Vanessa 


Teacher Assistant 




2006 


Mandosa, Heather 


Guidance 


BA, St. Anslem College 
MEd, Cambridge College 


2001 


Marenghi, Matthew 


Guidance 


BA, University of Massachusetts/ 

Lowell 
MEd, Boston University 


2002 


McDermott, Maurine 


Learning Specialist 


BA, Suffolk University 

MEd, University of Massachusetts 


2006 


McElheney, Caren 


Teacher Assistant 




2006 


Mello, Felicia 


Teacher Assistant (LO A) 




1989 


Millar, Beth 


Teacher Assistant 




2006 


Miller, Judith 


Teacher Assistant 




2006 


Muir, Connie 


Teacher Assistant 




1992 


Mullen, Patricia 


Learning Specialist 


BA, Stonehill College 

MEd, Framingham State College 


2001 


Murphy, Marcia 


Learning Specialist 


BA, Westfield State College 
MEd, Framingham State College 


2005 


Musmon, Sari 


Guidance 


BS, University of Mass/Amherst 
MEd, Boston University 


2000 


O'Brien, Rosemary 


Teacher Assistant 




2006 


Ormbeg, Erik 


Guidance 


BA, Ithaca College 
MEd, Suffolk University 


1998 


Osborn, Jennifer 


Teacher Assistant 




2006 


0' Sullivan, Barbara 


Teacher Assistant 




2002 


0' Sullivan, Mary 


Learning Specialist(LOA) BA, Providence College 


2002 






MA, Framingham State College 




Paolino, Michelle 


Teacher Assistant 




2005 


Patch, Mary 


Nurse 


BSN, University of Wisconsin 


1995 


Preikszas, Mary 


Learning Specialist 


BS, Frostburg State College 


1996 



MS, Framingham State College 



105 









Medfield 


Name 


Position 


Education 


Appointment 


Pugatch, Diane 


Learning Specialist 


BS, Boston University 
MS,Ed, Lesley College 


1995 


Read, Susan 


Teacher Assistant 




2004 


Riccio, Julia 


Speech/Language 


BA, Bates College 


2000 






MS, Teachers College, Columbia Univ. 


Robinson, Judith 


Inclusion Specialist 


AB, Boston University 
Masters, Newton College of 
the Sacred Heart 


1988 


Robinson, Kathleen 


Teacher Assistant 




2005 


Salamone, Mary 


Learning Specialist 


BS, Wheelock College 
MEd, Cambridge College 


1995 


Scheld, Nancy 


Teacher Assistant 




1997 


Schiemer, Nancy 


Nurse 


BSN, University of Bridgeport 
MA, New York University 


2003 


Sherman, Rebecca 


Teacher Assisstant 




2002 


Singer, Margaret 


Occupational Therapist 


BA, SUNY/Oneonta 


1998 



Snyder, Trinka 



Sockol, Dawn 



Psychologist 



Case Manager 



MA, Adelphi University 

MS, Boston University 

BA, MS, University of 2002 

Pennsylvania 
MBA, George Washington University 
CAGS, University of Massachusetts 



BA,MEd, Michigan State Univ. 
CAGS, Rhode Island College 



1985 



Speroni, Richard 


Teacher Assistant 




2000 


Strekalovsky, Elisabeth 


Psychologist 


BA, Middlebury College 

MEd, Lesley College 

MEd, CAGS, University of MA 


1998 


Sullivan, Barbara 


Learning Specialist 


BS, Framingham State College 
MEd, Boston State College 


1995 


Thomas, Annie 


Teacher Assistant 




2003 


Thompson, Kathleen 


Nurse 


BS, Salem State College 
MS, Boston College 


1997 


Tilden, Susan 


Speech/Language 


BA, Boston College 
MA, Michigan State 


2005 


Triest, Sherry 


Teacher Assistant 




2002 


Tubridy, Susan 


Teacher Assistant 




2003 


Typadis, Angela 


Integrated Preschool 


BA, Stonehill College 

MEd, Bridgewater State College 


1989 


Villone, Nancy 


Teacher Assistant 




2005 


Wall, Heidi 


Speech/Language 


BA, Boston College 
MS, Boston University 


2000 


Wasserman, Jay 


Learning Specialist 


BS, Northeastern University 
MS, Wheelock College 


2006 


Williams, Patricia 


Nurse 


BSN, Boston College 
MBA, Virginia Polytech 


2006 


Zappula, MaryEllen 


Nurse 


BSN, Salve Regina University 


2005 


Zrike, Sara 


Teacher Assistant 




1999 



106 



FOOD SERVICES 



Mintzer, Richard 

Miller, Terry 

Anderson, Ruth 

Bickel, Catherine 

Brown, Angela 

Centola, Denise 

Clark, Heather 

David, Denise 

DeRoche, Nancy 

Evans, Sandra (Manager) 

Friel, Nancy 

Hart, Tina 

Heidke, Darlene 

Hill, Mary 

Hughes, Janice 

Jones, Christina (Manager) 

Konevich, Stephanie (Manager) 

LaPlante, Laurie (Manager) 

Manning, Linda 

McCarthy, Hazel 

Mullen, Joanne 

Nelson, Carol (Manager) 

Szylkonis, Fran 



Food Services Director 

Food Services Secretary 

High School 

Blake Middle School 

High School 

Dale Street School 

High School 

Ralph Wheelock School 

High School 

Dale Street School 

Dale Street School 

High School 

Blake Middle School 

Ralph Wheelock School 

Ralph Wheelock School 

Blake Middle School 

Memorial School 

Ralph Wheelock School 

Dale Street School 

Memorial School 

Blake Middle School 

High School 

Blake Middle School 



107 



PLANT MANAGEMENT 



Bernard Spillane 

Bond, Robert 

Brown, Wayne(Head Custodian) 

Burton, Linda 

Comeau, Joseph 

Floser, Ronald 

Frazier, Matthew 

Glassman, Barry 

Guy, Steven 

Hayes, Ronald 

Hinkley, Paul 

Howland, George (Head Custodian) 

Jackson, Michael 

Johnson, Donald (Head Custodian) 

Johnson, Michael 

Kadehjian, Robert (Head Custodian) 

MacPherson, John(Head Custodian) 

Martin, Henry 

Murphy, Brian 

Murray, Jeffrey 

Nicolazzo, Anthony 

Norian, Paul 

Quayle, Thomas 

Rogers, Thomas 

Stavris, Kenneth 

Vogel, Keith 

Volpicelli, Brian 



Director 

Maintenance 

Dale Street School 

Blake Middle School 

Dale Street School 

High School 

Blake Middle School 

Maintenance 

Memorial School 

High School 

Central Office 

Memorial School 

Maintenance 

High School 

Blake Middle School 

Blake Middle School 

Ralph Wheelock School 

Dale Street School 

High School 

Blake Middle School 

High School 

Ralph Wheelock School 

Maintenance 

Memorial School 

High School 

Memorial School 

Ralph Wheelock School 



108 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF FINANCE AND 

OPERATIONS 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

I am pleased to submit to you and the citizens of Medfield the 2006 Annual Report of the 
Director of Finance and Operations. I remain confident that the financial and operational 
components of the Medfield Public Schools are well-positioned to continue to contribute 
to the ongoing excellence of the system. 

In the area of building maintenance, the School Committee and District Administration 
continued to address the capital improvement and maintenance needs of the facilities. 
Funds are budgeted and expended annually to continue the process of replacing carpeting 
and tiling, classroom furniture and repainting interior spaces as needed. With 
cooperation from individuals throughout the District, we focused on energy usage in all 
of our facilities and were successful in mitigating the impacts of the dramatic spike in 
energy costs which were experienced nationwide. We availed ourselves of energy 
conservation measures provided through our utility provider and installed occupancy 
sensors at the Dale Street and Wheelock Schools. In addition, we were selected by NStar 
to participate in a Benchmarking Initiative project which provided a comprehensive 
Energy Efficiency Opportunity Assessment of the Dale Street School at no cost to the 
District. We have begun implementing the recommendations contained in the report and 
have investigated the applicability of the recommendations at other facilities. I am 
pleased to report that through these efforts as well as through the efforts of staff and 
students at all of our facilities, we are seeing positive results. For example, after 
normalizing for the mild weather during 2006, the use of heat in each of our buildings 
was substantially reduced - at a greater rate than anticipated based on the reduction of 
heating degree days. 

We continue to address accessibility issues throughout our buildings. Funds were 
appropriated in 2005 and 2006 to provide handicapped accessible adult rest room 
facilities in the Wheelock School. This work was accomplished in 2006. We also 
secured funding in 2006 for the installation of a vertical lift at the Wheelock School to 
improve accessibility at this facility. This project was put to bid and work commenced 
during the year; we anticipate that it will be completed by the spring of 2007. We also 
provided van accessible handicapped parking at the Dale Street School. 

The five-year capital budget is updated annually. The expertise that Bernie Spillane, 
Director of Plant Management, provides during this endeavor has been invaluable. This 
planning and management tool provides a systematic analysis of the capital needs of the 
system and its facilities. The capital plan continues to focus on the Dale Street and 
Wheelock Schools, and attempts to provide a realistic assessment of our building and 



109 



maintenance requirements within the context of fiscal realities. Through this process it 
has become clear that in order to provide the appropriate learning environment while 
concurrently preserving our financial resources, it is important that we replace the single- 
paned windows at these buildings. This has become increasingly important given the 
rapid rise in energy costs. As such, funds were requested in 2006 to begin to replace 
windows at the Dale Street School. We obtained an appropriation of $39,000 to begin 
this work and nine (9) windows have been ordered and are expected to be installed this 
winter. We expect to seek funding for additional windows during the next few years. 

With the completion of the 3-school building project and our full occupancy of the High 
School/Middle School complex, we assessed the manner by which we maintain our 
buildings and grounds. We determined that by assuming responsibility for an increasing 
amount of grounds maintenance functions "in-house", with a grounds maintenance 
employee, we will be able to provide enhanced levels of service for no additional cost. 
As such, the Fiscal Year 2007 budget included this position. We have all been pleased by 
the results provided through this service delivery method. 

In the area of student transportation, as was discussed in last year's report, in 2005 we 
conducted a comprehensive examination of our school bus transportation system. This 
examination included a determination of the best way to use the comprehensive and 
timely data provided by the Town's Geographic Information System (GIS), as well as a 
determination of how to incorporate this data with appropriate transportation routing 
software systems. Following this examination, we successfully installed a new software 
package which will enable us to improve the efficiency of our operations. The benefit of 
this project became evident during 2006 as we were able to reduce the number of busses 
for which we contract by two, saving a significant sum of money that could be redirected 
to the classroom. 

Our school lunch program continues to provide appropriate and healthy meals to our 
students. Director of Food Services Rich Mintzer continues to take the initiative in 
determining the preferences of our customers in menu options while continuing to 
provide nutritionally-balanced meals. Rich remained actively involved with the District's 
Wellness Committee which was established to undertake a comprehensive examination 
of the nutritional quality of school meals, promotion of physical activity, nutrition 
education and staff wellness pursuant to recent federal legislation. We strive to continue 
to enhance our successful program while maintaining its financial viability, which 
operates distinctly from the appropriated budget. 



110 



The budget process in 2006 culminated in the adoption of a budget for the Medfield 
Public Schools of $23,685,575. This represented an increase of $1,922,382 or 8.83% 
over the sum provided the previous year. This budget required an operational override to 
Proposition 2 Vi and we are very grateful to the Town for approving this budget. The 
ongoing budget process has focused on addressing the District's needs while maintaining 
excellence. The District and building-based administrative team have been working 
diligently in preparing a budget blueprint that incorporates the direction provided by the 
School Committee. 

In closing, I would like to express my sincere appreciation to my co-workers and staff for 
their continued exemplary assistance. I look forward with confidence to addressing the 
opportunities and meeting the challenges which lie ahead. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Charles L. Kellner 

Director of Finance and Operations 



111 



REPORT OF THE AMOS CLARK KINGSBURY HIGH 

SCHOOL 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

As principal of the Amos Clark Kingsbury (Medfield) High School, I respectfully submit 
this annual report for the school year ending December 31, 2006. 

I am pleased to report that we have had an exceptionally strong year on several different 
levels. Our students have excelled in the classroom, on the playing field, and on the 
stage. 

The official enrollment for the high school for the 2005-06 school year was 861 students. 
There were 177 graduates in the class of 2006. Of these, 94% have gone on to further 
their studies at post-secondary institutions of learning. Among many others, some of the 
schools to which our students were accepted included: Boston College, Boston 
University, MIT, Colgate University, Bucknell University, Yale University, Lehigh 
University, Delaware University, Tufts University, Stonehill College, Providence 
College, Northeastern University, and Clemson University. 

Over the course of the year, our students demonstrated time and again that they are 
committed not only to high achievement, but to character, honesty, service, and 
leadership. In demonstration of this point, this year 62 of the graduating class, were also 
members of the National Honor Society. In addition, Zachary Nolan and Christian 
Termyn were selected as Honor Essayists by the high school faculty and were presented 
with their awards after delivering their speeches at the graduation ceremony on June 4, 
2006. Also during the closing ceremonies for the year, Mr. Vincent "Red" Palumbo 
(Class of 1936) was honored at Senior Class Day for his lifetime achievements. His 
plaque was placed with those of other accomplished graduates on the wall of the 
Medfield High School Hall of Excellence. 

This year we were proud to learn that two of our students were named National Merit 
Scholar Finalists. Gabrielle and Jessica Ruggiero qualified for this award by being one 
of 16, 000 students selected from a pool of 50,000 highest scorers on the PS AT in 2004. 
Additionally, we were honored to learn that the following students were commended in 
the National Merit Scholarship Program: William Burton, Christopher Dragotakes, 
Margaret Fisher, Lauren Gill, Sampo Hynynen, Mark Palermo, Amy Skerry, Chris 
Termyn, Sarah Walkowicz, John Welch, Emily Wilson. These students received a 
certificate of achievement from the National Merit Scholarship Corporation and join 
34,000 other high school students, selected from a pool of 50,000 of the highest scorers 
nationally on the PS AT in 2003, recognized for their academic promise. 



112 



This year, more than 97% of our graduating seniors took the College Board 
Examinations, up from 95%. Our SAT I and SAT II scores were well above state and 
national averages and showed an increase from previous years. See graph: 

Medfield High School Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) Results 



Year 


2000 


200 


Verbal 
(MHS) 


587 


552 


Math 
(MHS) 


581 


562 


State Avg. 


(verbal) 
(Math) 




Nation Avg. 


(verbal) 
(math) 





2002 



543 



556 



2003 



570 



568 



2004 



560 



568 



2005 



571 



574 



2006 



582/578' 



574 



513/510 
524 

503/497 
518 



*This was the first year that the SAT incorporated writing into the verbal component. MHS scored 582 in critical 
reading and 578 in writing. 

Our students performed exceptionally well on the state mandated MCAS exams as well. 
For instance, this year 96% of our 10 th grade students scored in the Advanced/Proficient 
category in English/Language Arts, ranking us 5 th in the state, and 96% of our 10 th grade 
students scored in the Advanced/Proficient category in mathematics ranking us 8 th in the 
state. See graph: 

7 Year Trend of Medfield High School Students Scoring in Advanced and Proficient on MCAS 
Year 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 



Eng/Lang Arts 

(State Avg.) 

Mathematics 

(State Avg.) 



65% 



69% 



79% 90% 92% 



73% 83% 82% 



93% 



91% 



94% 



92% 



96% 

(69%) 

96% 

(67%) 



It came as no surprise this year to see our Medfield High School students continue to 
achieve success in co-curricular activities as well during 2005-06. (see related report of 
the Director of Athletics). With roughly 90% of our students choosing to participate in 
either student government, school clubs, music, drama, or athletic programs, most report 
feeling fully engaged in high school experience while here at MHS. For the second 
straight year, our Girl's Volleyball Team took home the Division II State Title with a 
dramatic win over Bourne. And, for the first time in school history, our Boy's Varsity 
Football Team were crowned Super bowl Champions in Division III for an impressive 
win over Whittier Tech. Additionally, for the second year running, Medfield High 
School was a runner up for the prestigious Dalton Award. This award is given to the 



113 



school with the best winning percentage in Division III athletics in Massachusetts. In 
addition, our Concert Band, Orchestra, and Concert Choir were honored at the 
Massachusetts Instrumental and Choral Conductors Association (MICCA) Festival, 
earning gold, silver, and bronze medals respectively. The High School Concert Band 
performed at Worcester's Mechanics Hall as part of the Stars at the Symphony Concert. 
The High Music Department traveled to Toronto to perform in an international music 
festival, receiving Best-Overall in all three group categories (band, chorus, and 
orchestra). Finally, our Jazz Ensemble took consecutive gold medals at the 
Massachusetts District and All-State Competition for the 5th straight year and was again 
invited to play at Boston's Hatch Shell as part of the IAJE Showcase Concert. The Music 
Department was excited to send several students representing all of our performing 
ensembles to both the Southeast District and All-State Music Festivals this year. 




2006 Superbowl Champions I 



2006 Volleyball State Champions! 



In the spring of 2006 our Theater Program presented the musical South Pacific and in the 
fall of 2006, the classic comedy, Once in a Lifetime. The students demonstrated once 
again their many talents both on the stage and in the orchestra pit. All shows were well 
attended and received rave reviews from audiences. 




A Scene from South Pacific, Spring 2006 



114 



In the area of professional development, we placed a heavy focus on continuing to "look 
at student work," using the Tuning Protocol, Improving Faculty Wellness, Enhancing 
our Technology capabilities, and preparing for the upcoming visit of the New England 
Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC). In addition, this past summer the 
building administration spent two days at the Warren Conference Center in Ashland, 
refining our plans for the year and fully examining our teaching practices in the high 
school. We continue to support our teachers in areas of enrichment, encouraging them to 
participate in such activities as Teachers as Scholars, and Research for Better Teaching 
courses. 

Regretably, in the spring of 2006, one of our longtime respected staff members at 
Medfield High School, Ms. Mary Patch retired from being the school nurse. Fortunately, 
however, she agreed to return to the high school in a part time capacity in the fall. 

As the principal of Medfield High School, it has been a pleasure to be a part of this 
community. There is a spirit of collaboration that exists between staff, students, parents, 
and community that can not be compared. On behalf of the members of our school 
community, I would like to publicly thank the Superintendent of Schools, the School 
Committee, the School Planning and Building Committee, the High School Site Council, 
the Medfield Coalition for Public Education, the Medfield High School Boosters, and the 
many parents and community members who continually support our young people, and 
our school. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Andrew W. Keough, Ed. D. 
Principal 



115 



Commencement 
Exercises of 

MEDFIELD 
HIGH SCHOOL 




The Amos Clark 

Kingsbury High School 

Class of 2006 

Sunday, June 4, 2006 

2:00 P.M. 
Medfield High School 



116 




CLASS OF 2006 CLASS OFFICERS 

John Galvin, President 

Alyx Kaizerman, Vice President 

Natalie Nicholson, Secretary 

Caitlin Morgan, Treasurer 

Ms. Joanne Schmidt 

Ms. Trinka Snyder 

Class Advisors 

ADMINISTRATION 

Robert C. Maguire, Superintendent 
Kathleen McArdle, Director of Pupil Services 
Andrew W. Keough, Ed.D, Principal 
Jeffrey Sperling, Dean of Students 
Kathleen Nunes, Dean of Academics 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Susan L. Ruzzo, Chairperson 

Carolyn P. Casey 

Susan C. Cotter 

Steven E. Kramer 

Debra M. Nochese 



117 



GRADUATION PROGRAM 

PROCESSIONAL Medfield High School Band 

NATIONAL ANTHEM Laird Borchers 

OPENING REMARKS Robert C. Maguire 

Superintendent of Schools 

WELCOME JohnGalvin 

President, Class of 2006 

HONOR ESSAYISTS Zachary Nolan 

Christian Terrayn 

CHORAL SELECTION Senior Choir 

"I Hope You Dance" 

MESSAGE TO THE CLASS OF 2006 Susan Ruzzo 

Chairperson, Medfield School Committee 

SENIOR SPEAKER David Hiltz 

MESSAGE FROM THE PRINCIPAL Andrew W. Keough 

PRESENTATION OF CLASS GIH Caithn Morgan 

Treasurer, Class of 2006 

PRESENTATION OF DIPLOMAS* 

Susan L. Ruzzo Medfield School Committee 

Robert C. Maguire Superintendent of Schools 

Andrew W. Keough Principal 

RECESSIONAL Medfield High School Band 

♦PLEASE REFRAIN FROM APPLAUSE UNTIL ALL 
GRADUATES HAVE RECEIVED THEIR DIPLOMAS 



118 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ - iKgh ■• 

AWARDS 

PRESENTED AT SENIOR RECOGNITION NIGHT 

JUNE 1, 2006 

Daughters of the American Revolution Citizenship Award John Galvin 

Robert C. Byrd Scholarship Nomination Sampo Hynynen 

Principal's Leadership Award Zachary Nolan 

MSSAA Award Caitlin Morgan 

National Merit Commended Scholars William Burton, 

Christopher Dragotakes, Margaret Fisher, Lauren Gill, 

Sampo Hynynen, Mark Palermo, Amy Skerry, Christian Termyn, 

Sarah Walkowicz, Tyler Wardwell, John Welch, Emily Wilson 

National Merit Finalists Gabrielle Ruggiero, Jessica Ruggiero 

Academic Excellence Awards David Bell, Amy Dolan, Lauren Gill, Sampo Hynynen, 

Meghan Krupka, Alexander Levine, Stephanie Martin, 

Zachary Nolan, Taylor Ricketson, Gabrielle Ruggiero, 

Amy Skerry, Christian Termyn, Amanda Thole, Ngozika Uzoma, 

Sarah Walkowicz, Tyler Wardwell, Emily Wilson, Alyssa Wood 



SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS 

Medfield High School Scholar/Athlete Award Amy Skerry 

Zachary Nolan 

Thomas Reis Award Molly Barrett 

John Galvin 

Medfield Ladies Spring Tennis Kendra Kenney 

Christian Termyn 

Medfield Sportsmen Club's Harry S. Sonnenberg Scholarship Kristin Lynch 

Lamp of Learning Scholarship JohnLaCerda, Megan Walsh, Kiley Grant, 

Bron Simon, Jessica Schlesinger, John Welch 

National Honor Society Scholarships James Devereux, John Galvin, 

Lauren Gill, Kristin Lynch, Amy Skerry, Tara Woods 

National Honor Society Book Award Felix Meissner 

Medfield Teachers Association Book Awards LeanneDiPesa 

Catherine Curtin 

Norfolk County Teachers Association Future Educators Scholarship David Hiltz 

Madelyn L. Grant Scholarship Amy Dolan 

Christopher Dragotakes 



119 



; School : 

SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS (Continued) 

Thomas Family Dental Associates Scholarship Amanda Thole 

Medfield School Boosters Community Service Awards Christian Termyn 

Sheila Gill 

Medfield School Boosters School Spirit Scholarship Kevin Lynch 

MaryKate Heavey 

Medfield Fitness Association Scholarship Award David Hiltz 

Stephanie Martin 

Peter Kennedy Memorial Scholarship Dillon McDermott 

Briana DeSeignora 

Medfield Youth Basketball Association Bob Porack Memorial Scholarship Mathew Reardon 

Sarah Mintz 

Medfield In-Town Charities Scholarship Michelle Beatrice, Joseph Mygan, 

Deana Norton, Courtney Trudeau 

Prudential Page Realty Scholarship in Memory of Roger C. Rao Wesley Fox 

Medfield Lions Club Scholarship Amy Skerry 

John Galvin 

Medfield Employers and Merchants Organization Scholarship Nolan Mayer 

Zachary Nolan 

American Legion Women's Auxiliary Scholarship Matthew Keleher 

American Legion, Beckwith Post No. 1 10 Scholarship Reba Cunningham 

Deana Norton 
Nicole Donovan 

American Legion, Beckwith Post No. 110 Medals Lauren Yetra 

Brett Pendleton 

Sons of the Legion Scholarship Christa Tortorici 

Christina McClay 

Medfield Youth Baseball/Softball Scholarship Andrew Burrell 

Lindsay Colvin 

Medfield High School Theatre Society Scholarship Meredith Hall 

Margaret Fisher 

Erin Merrell 

Casey Maloney 

David E. Medeiros Theatre Society Memorial Scholarship Amy Hartstein 

T.A. Blake Theatrical Society Scholarship Benjamin Verreault 

Sarah Walkowicz 

Medfield Soccer Inc. Scholarship Amy Skerry 

Meghan Krupka 



120 



Medfildd 



SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS (Continued) 

Student Council Award Scholarship Charles McQuillan 

Paul Quatromoni Memorial Scholarship Amy Frankenthaler 

Amy Fiske American Field Service Scholarship Ngozika Uzoma 

Jennifer Prelack 

Friends of the Library Amy Fiske Creative Writing Scholarship Danielle Steever 

Amy Fiske Poetry Award Tyler Wardwell 

Middlesex Savings Bank Scholarship Briana DeSeignora 

Medfield Music Association Scholarship Margaret Fisher 

Nolan Mayer 

Lowell Mason Music Education Scholarship Christian Termyn 

Christopher Naughton Memorial Scholarship Zachary Nolan 

William Palumbo Baseball Scholarship Kevin Lynch 

Medfield League of Women Voters Scholarship Lindsay Colvin 

Medfield Police Daniel McCarthy Memorial Scholarship William Burton 

Medfield Police Detective Robert E. Naughton Memorial Scholarship Stephanie Martin 

Benjamin Franklin Savings Bank Scholarship Elizabeth Bain 

Hannah Adams Woman's Club Scholarship Allison Landry 

Stephanie Martin 

Medfield Permanent Firefighters Association Scholarships Kelsey Rogers 

Nicole Donovan 

Michele Lomax 

Christa Tortorici 

Medfield Firefighters Mutual Relief Association Scholarships Kelsey Rogers 

Nicole Donovan 

Michele Lomax 

Steven Hamilton 

Hannah Adams/Cecile Levesque Memorial Scholarship Sarah Walkowicz 

Medfield Italian American Scholarship Laura Festa 

Eric Michael Perkins Football Scholarship Stephen Sullivan 

Medfield Youth Hockey Doug Woodruff Scholarship Derek McLean 

Peter Panciocco Scholarship Christopher O'Rourke 

David Gibbs Scholarship Briana DeSeignora 

Medfield High School Reunion Committee Scholarship 

In Memory of Elaine Rawding Taylor. EricLudwig 

MetroWest Community Health Care Foundation Amanda O'Toole 

MetroWest Marine Corps League Detachment #1037 Scholarship William Burton 



121 



Medfield 



1 *&r CLASS OF 2006 SCHOLARSHIPS AND AWARDS 

Destination Imagination Scholarship Leigh Coulombre 

Austin College Academic Honors Scholarship Reba Cunningham 

Salve Regina University Dean Scholarship Catherine Curtin 

Commonwealth College Scholarship AmyDolan 

Medway Federation of Teachers Scholarship AmyDolan 

University of South Carolina McKissick Scholars Award Annie El-Far 

Marist College Presidential Scholarship Sarah Gertner 

Lehigh University's Dean's Scholarship Lauren Gill 

Marist College Scholarship Alexandra Grabbe 

University of Vermont's Presidential Scholarship Kiley Grant 

Brigham Young University Heritage Scholarship Sampo Hynynen 

University of Vermont's Presidential Scholarship Jennifer Jordan 

Southern Methodist University Distinguished Scholar Award. Alyx Kaizerman 

Saint Michael's Scholarship Kendra Kenney 

John and Abigail Adams Scholarship Meghan Krupka 

Commonwealth College Engineering Scholarship Meghan Krupka 

University of Massachusetts Academic Honors Scholarship Meghan Krupka 

Northeastern University Achievement Award Allison Landry 

Siena College Presidential Scholarship Kristin Lynch 

Saint Michael's Scholarship Michelle Lynch 

University of Tampa Performing Arts Scholarship LyndsayMagid 

University of Tampa Scholarship LyndsayMagid 

Boston University Scholar Scholarship Stephanie Martin 

University of Arizona Excellence Award Nolan Mayer 

Denison Alumni Award Karin Mombourquette 

Comcast Leaders and Achievers Scholarship Caitlin Morgan 

Stonehill College Dean's Scholarship Caitlin Morgan 

John and Abigail Adams Scholarship Mark Palermo 

Commonwealth College Engineering Scholarship Mark Palermo 

College of Charleston Academic Scholarship Jennifer Prelack 

College of Charleston Presidential Scholarship Jennifer Prelack 

Boston University Merit Scholarship Gabrielle Ruggiero 

Boston University National Scholar Award Gabrielle Ruggiero 

Boston University Merit Scholarship Jessica Ruggiero 

Boston University National Scholar Award Jessica Ruggiero 

Boston University Dean's Scholar Award Amanda Thole 

Ohio State University National Buckeye Plus Scholarship Connor Thompson 

Hobart and William Smith College Presidential Leadership Scholarship Kimberly Tremlett 

Hofstra University Achievement Scholarship Courtney Trudeau 

Tufts University Balfour-Chenault Scholar Scholarship Ngozika Uzoma 

Bendey College President's Scholarship Carl Vellali 

Syracuse University Scholarship John Welch 

Syracuse University Chancellor's Scholar Award John Welch 

George Washington University Presidential Scholarship Alyssa Wood 



122 






CLASS DAY AWARDS ^^ 

PRESENTED AT CLASS DAY 
JUNE 2, 2006 
ART: 

Art Excellence Amy Dolan, Hope Clunie 

Boston Globe Art Award Douglas Richard 

ENGLISH: 

English Award John Welch, Alyssa Wood 

Journalism William Burton, Alyssa Wood 

Speech Deana Norton 

Yearbook Francesca Wanucha 

Creative Writing Allison Landry 

FOREIGN LANGUAGE: 

French Alyssa Wood 

Spanish ErinMerrell 

National Latin Exam Amy Hartstein, Catherine Curtin, 

Excellence and Achievement in Linguistics and Language William Burton 

MATHEMATICS: 

American Math Competition Sampo Hynynen, Brett Pendleton 

Gabrielle Ruggiero, Michael Dewhirst 
Excellence in Math Eric Thompson, Stephanie Martin, Amy Skerry 

MUSIC: 

John Philip Sousa Band Christian Termyn 

Louis Armstrong Margaret Fisher, Nolan Mayer 

National Choral Meredith Gabor 

National Orchestra Laird Borchers 

SCIENCE: 

Biology NgozikaUzoma 

Chemistry Felix Meissner 

Physics Felix Meissner 

Society of Women Engineers Amy Skerry, Stephanie Martin, Meghan Krupka 

SOCIAL STUDIES: 

Social Studies Award James Devereux 

WELLNESS: 

Outstanding Participation Kevin Lynch 

PERFECT ATTENDANCE: Frank Schepps 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT: Charles McQuillan, Amy Skerry, Emily Wilson, 

Zachary Nolan, William Burton, Meredith Gabor, David Hiltz, 

Alyx Kaizerman, John LaCerda, Allison Landry, Ngozika Uzoma 

Danielle Steever, Christian Termyn, Katerina Velichansky, Tyler Wardwell 



123 



Mcdfifeld 



MEDFIELD HIGH SCHOOL 
GRADUATES - CLASS OF 2006 



* LUCAS ROSSI ARONSON 
MICHAEL JAMES ASHCROFT 
JORGE RAFAEL AVILES 
BRIAN WILLIAM AYOTTE 
ELIZABETH MARIE BAIN 
MOLLY ELIZABETH BARRETT 
CHRISTOPHER MATTHEW BAUER 
MICHELLE ROSE BEATRICE 

*LINDSEYANNEBEGGAN 
+ DAVID EUGENE BELL 

* LAIRD MACDONALD BORCHERS 
MARYBETH ANN BOSAK 
MIRIAM SARAH BRODY 

* LAUREN PAIGE BROUSELL 
ANDREW JOHN BURRELL 

* WILLIAM MICHAEL BURTON 
MICHAEL ANTHONY CAPPUCCI 
PETER LEONARD CIANCARELLI 
BRIANA MARC1A CINCOTTA 
CHRISTOPHER MICHAEL CLAIR 

* HOPE ELIZABETH CLUNIE 
DAVID JOSEPH COLETTI 

* LINDSAY RACHEL COLVIN 
BRIDGET ELLEN CONNELLY 
LEIGH ROSE COULOMBRE 
REBAMAREE CUNNINGHAM 

* CATHERINE TRACEY CURTIN 

* KATELYN MARIE DALEY 
BRIANA CHRISTINE DESEIGNORA 

* JAMES ADAM DEVEREUX 
MICHAEL JARED DEWHIRST 
LEANNE MARIE DIPESA 
BRIAN MICHAEL DIPISA 

f * AMY MARGARET DOLAN 
NICOLE ELIZABETH DONOVAN 

* CHRISTOPHER STEPHEN DRAGOTAKES 
ANN NORINE EL-FAR 

DANIEL WESLEY ENTRIKIN 
LAURA MARIE FESTA 

* MARGARET LYNN FISHER 
MARTIN BRAYTON FITZGERALD 
CAROLINE MARIE FLESSA 
WESLEY MARTIN FOX 

* AMY RACHEL FRANKENTHALER 

* MEREDITH HOPE GABOR 

* JOHN EDWARD GALVIN 



JOHN TOWNSEND GARTY 
JULIA ELIZABETH GERSUK 

* SARAH KATHLEEN GERTNER 
h* LAUREN ELIZABETH GILL 

SHEILA MARIE GILL 
ANNA ELIZABETH GOETZ 
ALEXANDRA BLACKBURN GRABBE 

* KILEY JEAN GRANT 

* MEREDITH CHESLEY HALL 
STEVEN THOMAS HAMILTON 

* SUSAN FOSTER HART 

* AMY ELIZABETH HARTSTEIN 
LEAH ROSE HATTEN 
MARYKATE HEAVEY 

* CHRISTOPHER KENVIN HENDY 
DAVID MICHAEL HILTZJR 

»-*SAMPO KALEVA HYNYNEN 
NATALIE ELIZABETH INSOGNA 

* ADAM MYER ISAACSON 
JENNIFER CHADBOURNE JORDAN 

* ALYX MICHELE KAIZERMAN 
MATTHEW EDWARD KELEHER 
KENDRA MARYANN KENNEY 
STEPHANIE ANN KERASIOTES 

t-* MEGHAN THERESA KRUPKA 
ERNEST SEONG-KEON KUK 

* JOHN PATRICK LACERDA 
JEFFREY RICHARD LAFRENIERE 
ALLISON COURTNEY LANDRY 
DAVID ALLARD LANE 
STEPHEN PAUL LANG 
MMBERLY VICTORIA LEACH 

* CHRISTINE BRENNAN LENIHAN 
f * ALEXANDER WHITNEY LEVINE 

BRIAN PATRICK LIVELY, JR. 
MICHELE MARIE LOMAX 
ERIC JAMES LUDWIG 
KEVIN GEORGE LYNCH 

* KRISTIN MARY LYNCH 
MICHELLE KATHERINE LYNCH 
CHRISTOPHER JAMES MACLELLAN 
MOLLY HARRIS MACNEEL 
LYNDSAY SARAH MAGID 

CASEY PAULINE MALONEY 
JULIA ELIZABETH MANCUSO 

* RACHEL KATRINA MARKMAN 



124 



MEDFIELD HIGH SCHOOL 
GRADUATES - CLASS OF 2006 



Medflcld 
High; 

v %$eho^ 



+* STEPHANIE JOAN MARTIN 
NOLAN ALEXANDER MAYER 
JARED THOMAS MCCARTHY 
CHRISTINA EMILY MCCLAY 

* DILLON HYNES MCDERMOTT 
DEREK BRADLEY MCLEAN 
CAROLYNE MCMANAMA 

* CHARLES WILSON MCQUILLAN 
KRISTEN MARIE MCSHANE 

* FELLX MEISSNER 

* ERIN CARRESE MERRELL 
SARAH ANN MINTZ 
SEAN BRIAN MITCHELL 

* KARIN MARIE MOMBOURQUETTE 
ANTHONY CHARLES MORAN 

* CAITLIN SARAH MORGAN 
KATHLEEN STEWARD MULREY 
STEPHEN TASOS MULVOY 
JOSEPH RICHARD MYGAN 
NATALIE ANNE NICHOLSON 

+* ZACHARY MICHAEL NOLAN 
DEANA MARIE NORTON 
THOMAS FAIR NOWAK 
WHITNEY ELIZABETH O'CONNELL 
BRIANA GRACE O'NEIL 
CHRISTOPHER WILLIAM O'ROURKE 
BRENDAN WILLIAM O'SHEA 
AMANDA KELLY O'TOOLE 
MARK ANTHONY PALERMO 
JACOB MANN PARSONS 
BRETT CAMERON PENDLETON 

* MEGHAN MARIE POCHEBIT 
STEPHEN CHRISTMAN POPE 

* JENNIFER LYNNE PRELACK 
JACOB ROBERT RAHN 
MATHEW MERRILL REARDON 
SHAUNA NICOLE REYBURN 
LAURA LEE RIANHARD 
BRENDAN ROSS RICCIARDELLI 
DOUGLAS JOHN RICHARD 

+ * TAYLOR JULIA RICKETSON 
CHRISTINA ANASTASIA ROGERS 
KELSEY LYNN ROGERS 

MARSHAILS 

*NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY 



COLBY PALMER ROY 
CASEY JAMES RUGGIERO 
+*GABRIELLE FRANCES RUGGIERO 

* JESSICA LYNN RUGGIERO 

* KATE LYN SANFILIPPO 
FRANKJOESCHEPPSIV 

* JESSICA LEIGH SCHLESINGER 
BRON ALEXANDER SIMON 
BRENT ROBERT SISSON 

+* AMY ELIZABETH SKERRY 
CLAIRE MARIE STADOLNIK 
LEE STEVEN STASHENKO 

* DANIELLE SCOTT STEEVER 
KRISTA LOUISE STEINKRAUSS 
JEFFREY SCOTT SULLILVAN 
STEPHEN JOHN SULLIVAN 
SAMUEL BARRETT SWEENEY 

+* CHRISTIAN WILLIAM TERMYN 
+* AMANDA MARGARET THOLE 
BRIAN DUNN THOMAS 
CONNOR ANTHONY THOMPSON 
ERIC STEVEN THOMPSON 
DOMINIC CHRISTOPHER TORRACO 
CHRISTA MARIE TORTORICI 

* KIMBERLYANNETREMLETT 
COURTNEY MARIE TRUDEAU 

+* NGOZIKA AMANDA UZOMA 

* KATERINAANNEVELICHANSKY 
CARL VICTOR VELLALI 
BENJAMIN JOSEPH VERREAULT 

+* SARAH ELIZABETH WALKOWICZ 

* MEGAN ELIZABETH WALSH 
FRANCESCA GABRIELLE WANUCHA 
JON KENNETH WARD 

+* TYLER PETERSON WARDWELL 

* JOHN ROBERT WELCH 
STEVEN LOUIS WERNEKEN 
THOMAS LAWRENCE WERNEKEN 

+* EMILY ANNE WILSON 
+*ALYSSA LAURA WOOD 
*TARA ASHLEY WOODS 

* LAUREN ELIZABETH YETRA 



MICHAEL SHEA, MATTHEW WHALEN 

RECOGNIZED FOR ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE 



125 




MEDFIELD HIGH SCHOOL CIRCA 1887 




AMOS CIARK KINGSBURY HIGH SCHOOL 1961 - 2005 




MEDFIELD HIGH SCHOOL 

GRADUATION 

2006 



126 



REPORT OF THE THOMAS A. BLAKE MIDDLE SCHOOL 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

As principal of Thomas A. Blake Middle School, it is my pleasure to submit my final 
annual report for the year ending December 31, 2006. 1 have so enjoyed the last ten years 
working with the students, staff and parents of Blake Middle School. I value the 
commitment and caring of this community and will forever have fond memories of Blake 
Middle School. 

This last year we have settled into our building and have been able to devote our energies 
to continuing the high academic standards and supportive sense of community that make 
Blake the dynamic school it is. In May of 2006, Blake was honored as a New England 
League of Middle Schools "Spotlight School", one of six in New England, because of our 
commitment to middle school philosophy, our support of the emerging adolescent and 
our high quality instructional and curricular programs. In addition, I am honored to have 
been awarded the NELMS "A+ Administrator's Award" for commitment to the 
education of young people. Judy Robinson, our inclusion facilitator, was honored with the 
Costen Award in Teaching Students with Asperger's Syndrome. These awards validate 
the exceptional educational environment at Blake. 

We have continued throughout this year to make Blake Middle School truly feel like our 
building. The CS A supported funding of our communication sign in front of the building 
to help parents be aware of upcoming programs. The CSA and the Medfield Foundation 
helped to renovate our auditorium by reconstructing parts of the stage, improving the 
sound and light system and building storage space. The CSA and the Medfield Coalition 
have helped to redesign our Fitness Center to provide an age appropriate facility for 
young adolescents. Complete with spinning bikes, urban rebounders and now a dance- 
dance revolution aerobic exercise station, students have a wide variety of engaging 
physical activities. In February, our Blake Canvas will be unveiled. With the support of 
the Coalition, David Fichter, a muralist, worked with the Blake students and staff to 
create a visual document of what Blake is all about. Every student and staff member 
shared ideas in words and then offered sketches to create the final sixty foot wall design 
in the cafeteria. The vibrant colors, the many events spotlighted and the brush strokes of 
so many help to assure that this mural is a permanent testimony to Blake Middle school. 

Students work hard at Blake and their academic success is evidence of their efforts. We 
again did exceptionally well on the State MCAS exams in English, math and science and 
technology. Our sixth graders scored an overall performance index of 90.3 in science and 
technology, 88.5 in math and 95.3 in English Language Arts. Our seventh graders scored 
91.3 in math and 96.2 in English Language Arts. Our 8 eighth graders scored 97.8 in 
English Language Arts, 89.1 in math. Fifty-three readers, an all time high, completed all 



127 



of the 35 summer reading books and served as student leaders in an author discussion 
with TA Barron, an adolescent science fantasy author who visited the school in the fall. 
Fifteen eighth graders received awards at the MIT Solar Car Competition and Will 
Donald and James Thomas were featured at the Engineers Annual Meeting in Boston for 
their extraordinary success on the West Point Bridge Design. This was the first year for 
the Coalition Spelling Bee and Blake was nobly represented by over forty teams. Our 
participation in the National Geography Bee sent James Marvel-Cohen on to the State 
Competition. 

The social and emotional intelligence of our students is essential. In the spring, four 
Blake teachers presented "What You Need to Know about the Internet that Your Children 
Already Know". Too much bullying goes on through instant messaging, and rumors can 
fill the internet waves. This workshop offered both information and strategies to students 
during the day and parents at night to help prevent these painful actions. This workshop 
will be presented this March at NELMS as it was recognized for its timely attention to a 
serious issue facing adolescents. Our long standing sixth grade parent workshops and our 
seventh grade Quest program continue to support working with parents to more 
effectively support "our" children. 

During the summer, the entire school read 12 Again as our all-school book. This book, 
written by Sue Corbett, shares a parent's experience of time travel. The mother appears as 
a twelve year old in her son's school. Students interviewed their parents about what life 
was like for them as a twelve year old and staff portrayed their twelve year old faces on a 
school bulletin board. Mrs. Corbett came to Blake and talked with the students about her 
novel and the ideas that influenced her writing. In addition, she worked with selected 
student authors, sharing tips about writing and listening to some of their ideas. It was 
another powerful unifying community learning experience. 

Community Service allows us a key opportunity to help develop a more informed and 
compassionate future generation. SIPS, Students Involved in Public Service, made 
considerable contributions this year spearheading many of our community service 
projects along with our Student Council and grade level leaders. SIPS gathered coats for 
the homeless, Pennies for Patients and sporting goods for children in the Dominican 
Republic. In addition, they collected canned goods for the Medfield Food Pantry, shared 
baskets of holiday cheer with the elderly at the Thomas Upham House and participated in 
the Walk for Hunger, Cancer Walk and Alzheimer Walk. Sixth graders took on the 
Heifer Project, integrating the program into their science, social studies and MARS 
curriculum. Speakers came and students raised money to help those in poorer nations be 
better able to help themselves. Eighth grade has long been committed to helping both the 
young and the old as they again provided much of the labor for the Christmas in The City 
event and the traditional Tilden Village Holiday Dinner. In addition, they worked in many 
local capacities as part of their bike trip through Medfield and led the labor force in 
preparing for Medfield' s Relay for Life. We have continued the support of our Sister 



128 



School in Indonesia, sending letters, making friendship bracelets and raising money 
through our annual Lip Sync Competition. 

The richness of one's education can also be found in the school wide events, extra 
curricular activities and field trips that complement the strong academic program at 
Blake. This past September marked the fifth anniversary of September 11 th . The entire 
school spent time to "Remember, Honor and Hope" for a better future. Our local police 
and firefighters were recognized for all they do to keep us safe. Students interviewed their 
parents about that horrific day five years ago and brainstormed together what we can each 
do to help assure peace in our world. Our school play "KIDS" written by our drama 
director Loretta Porter-Fahey, involved over 140 students in the joy of theater. It gave two 
nights of sell out crowds a real insight into kids these days! In addition, Mrs. Porter-Fahey 
worked with an acting ensemble to produce "Pieces of Eight", a moving play that speaks 
out against prejudice and bullying. The cast presented as the opening segment of the New 
England League of Middle Schools Fall Conference. A record number of teams from 
Blake participated in Destination Imagination, using their creative problem solving skills 
in many unique ways. Our musical groups also did extremely well. Our 7 th /8 th grade 
Chorus received a Silver medal at MICCA and a gold medal at the Great East Festivals. 
Jazz Choir and Orchestra both received gold medals at the Great East Festivals as well. 
The Middle School Orchestra and 6 th Grade Band won bronze award and the 7 th and 8 th 
grade band won the silver award at MICCA. Our Jazz Band won the gold and our 
Orchestra won the silver at the Music in the Park. 

Speakers came to the school and students traveled outside the school to make that 
essential link between academic learning and the real world. Sixth graders saw 
Shakespeare's Midsummer Night's Dream as part of their Shakespeare unit, listened to a 
Mark Twain presentation in preparation for the study of Tom Sawyer, marveled at the 
Museum of Science presentation on energy and traveled Medfield to better understand 
our geological beginnings. They worked with the Heifer farm to understand how basic 
needs of third world countries can be more adequately met. Seventh graders completed 
another successful opening of the school year with the four day trip to Nature's 
Classroom in Lake George, New York. This year, in addition to the outdoor education 
program, the team building activities, and the many science labs, students presented an 
evening of "Thursday Night Live" entertainment. Yoko Kawashima Watkins continued to 
inspire young readers in her annual visit as she shared her remembrances of the horrors of 
war in her novel So Far From the Bamboo Grove. Seventh graders also traveled the 
Freedom Trail in Boston, the Battle Road in Concord and the times of Dickens in the 
annual visit to the North Shore Music Theater for A Christmas Carol. Both seventh and 
eighth graders enjoyed assemblies during Foreign Language week as they listened to and 
participated in both French and Spanish songs and dances. Our Career Education program 
continues to provide students with an excellent eye at the world of work through speakers 
who shared their many varied careers and hands-on experiences in the world of work. 
Steven Karidoyanes, New England Conservatory conductor, and Andrea Silver, caterer 



129 



and personal chef,+ were keynote speakers for these events. Eighth graders also hiked and 
canoed through Medfield, traveled to Salem and Lowell and heard Abe Lincoln and 
famous short stories reproduced on stage. The annual eighth grade trip took in highlights 
of Washington DC and NYC. The entire school enjoyed additional enrichment 
experiences. Tom Brown, a national speaker on the negative impact of bullying, helped us 
to remember to reach out to others and be a supportive community. Again, we honored 
our local Veterans with a special musical assembly presented by the former 
Massachusetts Singing State Trooper, Danny Clark. All veterans were hosted to a 
recognition luncheon and an all school program. We came together for our Celebration of 
Voice as part of our annual Thanksgiving festivities. Eighth graders participated in our 
first Turkey Bowl in the morning and then the entire school joined in with Rhythm Kids, 
a group of local performers, who engaged us in finding "Blake's Beat" with forty African 
drums and many other native instruments. We completed our Celebration with the annual 
Pig Race, this year having twenty-seven contestants, the biggest showing yet. 

Technology continues to be a major focus as we expand our curriculum resources and 
extend our efforts to reach all learners. We have continued our partnership with Papa 
Gino's providing our technology fund with 20% of the profits from their sales on the 
second Thursday of the month. We have used these funds to buy software and licenses to 
enrich existing programs. All teachers now have access to United Streaming, a rich 
resource of video materials to supplement our curriculum. In addition, technology 
workshops have incorporated SmartBoards and LCD projectors as a common teaching 
tool in classrooms. Our CSA and Coalition helped fund these new opportunities. We will 
continue our technology benchmarks this year and utilize assistive technology to help 
more students be successful. 

As we move into 2007, Blake is working to assure that our middle school program 
remains adaptive to the needs of the emerging adolescent. Although our population has 
remained somewhat stable over the last two years, our knowledge of what young 
adolescents need to achieve at their greatest potential encourages us to redesign and 
create more complex and fulfilling programs, all of which involves additional resources. 
Our expanded Advisory Program assures that each child has a caring adult to go to in the 
building and works to provide a forum to build community and discuss relevant issues. In 
addition, we have spent considerable time over the last year focusing on academic 
advising and helping students set realistic and attainable goals. We have also cemented 
our commitment to reading for all with sustained silent reading as part of our schedule. 

We face an exciting spring as fourteen Blake teachers present at the New England League 
of Middle Schools Conference. Our recognition as a "Spotlight School" includes our 
7 th /8 th grade band opening the regional ceremonies and Stephen Krawec, our student 
council president, being the opening student keynote speaker. Staff will also be attending 
the New England Social Studies Conference to help us articulate our social studies K-12 
curriculum, the national New Beginnings Conference to help support our expanding New 



130 



Teacher Induction Program and the Rick Lavoie workshop co-sponsored by SEP AC to 
help us all better meet the social and emotional needs of all of our learners. 

Energies will be directed over the next few months to assuring a continued successful 
path for Blake. We will welcome Robert Parga on July 1 st as the next principal of Blake 
Middle School. We will be searching to fill key staff positions as two key veteran staff 
retire in June. We face another exciting year but the students, staff and parents of Blake 
are up to the challenge. It has been a great joy to work with such inquisitive and 
enthusiastic young minds, committed and talented staff, and supportive and caring 
parents. My utmost respect goes to the Blake Community. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Margaret Mongiello 
Principal 



131 



REPORT OF THE DALE STREET SCHOOL 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

As Principal for the Dale Street School for the 2006 to 2007 school year, I am delighted 
to submit this report for the year ending December 31, 2006. 

ENROLLMENT 

The enrollment at Dale Street School on October 1, 2006 was 220 students in grade four 
and 263 students in grade five for a total of 483 students. The average class size was in 
the range of 21/23 students per class. 

INSTRUCTIONAL HIGHLIGHTS AND ACHIEVEMENTS 

The major instructional focus this year at the Dale Street School has been the 
implementation of the Writer's Workshop Model. Through the efforts of the 
English/Language Arts Study Group and several years of analysis, writing was targeted 
as the initial goal for change in the English Language Arts program at Dale Street. The 
Writer's Workshop Model has been effectively implemented at the primary levels and as 
the students move to an upper elementary level, it made sense to continue the consistency 
of a writing approach. All job-embedded professional development days have been 
devoted to grade levels working with a Writing Consultant. The consultant facilitated the 
training and worked with teachers to design pacing schedules, rubrics, assessment, and 
writing prompts. Wherever possible, the writing curriculum was integrated with other 
core subject areas such as Science and Social Studies. 

Another major instructional focus this year has been the implementation of year two of 
our new Mathematics curriculum. The Scott Foresman Addison Wesley Mathematics 
program is a standards based approach. Teachers have been provided with on-going, 
sustained professional development during all of the in-service days as well as job- 
embedded professional days. A Math Consultant facilitated the teacher training; teachers 
assessed the program during a summer Research and Development opportunity. Pacing 
schedules were adjusted, new assessments were designed, and parts of the curriculum 
were highlighted or condensed. 

As part of the District's plan to support students who might be at risk of failing MCAS 
tests, Dale Street School continued to implement a plan through MCAS Remediation 
Academies. The Program called for Individual MCAS Student Success Plans to be 
developed for students who meet specific criteria and extra instruction was provided in 
small groups either before or after school. MCAS Academies provide remedial support 
to students in grade four and five in the areas of English/Language Arts and Mathematics. 



132 



Dale Street School teachers also continue to explore ways to provide differentiated 
instructional activities for students in their classes. The teachers work with a consultant, 
the Library Media Specialist, the Instructional Technology Specialist, and each other to 
help them plan lessons and activities that will both challenge and meet the needs of all 
students in their classrooms. The area of focus this year for differentiated activities has 
had an emphasis on Math and Writing, however support was also provided in the areas of 
English/Language Arts, Social Studies, and Science. This will be an ongoing focus and 
core philosophy at the Dale Street School. 

In accordance with the Medfield Public School's Strategic Plan, Dale Street completed 
Phase I of a technology upgrade. Each classroom received three new computers; space 
saving furniture; and a laser printer. All twenty- six computers in the Library Media 
Center were also upgraded and color laser printers were installed in the LMC and front 
offices. 

Dale Street has continued to work with the (K-5) Technology Integration Specialist. 
Some of the highlights in the area of technology include: 

• Training Staff how to effectively use: 

o Multiple Computers in the classroom 

o New software available on both classroom computers and LMC computers 
o Technology component of the Mathematics program 
o ClassWorks Gold Math and ELA Programs (MCAS Academy teachers) 
o CD-ROM training for new programs in Mathematics, Problem-Solving, 
and Creative Thinking 

• Purchase of additional AlphaSmarts with keyboarding programs to support whole 
class activities 

• Working with the Principal and Director of Technology to plan and design the 
Dale Street Technology Program 

ENRICHMENT OPPORTUNITIES 

Students continue their participation in a number of enrichment activities. As part of the 
unit of study on geology, grade four students visited the Peabody Museum of Archeology 
and Ethnology. A Museum of Science Traveling Program presented a unique science 
learning experience called "Animal Encounters. " Both fourth and fifth grade students 
enjoyed performances at the Boston Symphony Orchestra and plays at the Wheelock 
Family Theater. Grade five students attended a field trip to the Christa McAuliffe Space 
Center at Framingham State College, visited the MFA, and attended a workshop by Mr. 
Magnet of the MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center to support the unit on electricity 
and magnetism. In addition, fourth grade participated in a three week long "Poet in 
Residence" program with Andrew Green, and fifth grade participated in a three week 
long "Author in Residence" program with Barbara O'Connor. 



133 



School-wide enrichment included the continuation of our Intramural Program, the 
Bullying and Teasing Program, the National Geography Bee, and performances that 
featured the Magic ofLyn and Pyramids and Pharaohs (Grade 5). Monthly school- wide 
assemblies include the themes of bullying and teasing, safety, world hunger, and school 
spirit, and community. 

FUTURE GOALS 

A Strategic Plan has been developed for the Medfield Public Schools. Several goals for 
the Dale Street School have been identified and will be continuously reviewed. A 
sampling of these goals is as follows: 

♦ Continue to implement the new Mathematics program with continuing supportive 
professional development for teachers 

♦ Continue to review the English/Language Arts program through the work of the ELA 
Study Group 

♦ Continue to implement the Writer's Workshop model with continuing supportive 
professional development for all teachers 

♦♦♦ Continue to review and revise the Character Education Program with an emphasis on 
bullying and teasing 

♦ Review and revise the Health and Wellness program to reflect the Department of 
Education's standards 

♦ Review and revise the technology standards with an added emphasis on integrating 
technology into the curriculum and differentiating instruction 

♦ Continue to update, upgrade, repair, and maintain the school facility 

♦ Continue to communicate well with parents and students by keeping the website 
current 

STAFF RECOGNITION 

The Dale Street staff has worked incredibly hard through a variety of changes, 
improvements, and challenges. They are a tremendously committed and dedicated staff 
who cares about each other and work together to provide the best education to the 
students of Dale Street. 

PUBLIC/PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT 

Throughout the school year, the Dale Street School Council and the Community School 
Association (CSA) have continued to provide opportunities for parental involvement with 
the goal of strengthening the tie between home and school. Our community service 
program, The Beacon Project, continued to be a highlight of the parents' efforts. The 
Beacon Project provided students opportunities to serve the community as volunteers at 
the Memorial Public Library, Medfield Animal Shelter, Park and Recreation Department, 
and Tilden Village. In addition the students raised funds for the LMC through the Box 



134 



Tops for Education program and collected money and food for the Medfield Food 
Cupboard. 

The CSA provided Dale Street School with funding for additional technology requests, 
sponsored the Holiday Create- A-Craft Fair and Kids Night Out, and raised funds through 
the sale of Yankee Candles, SCRIPT, and Medfield Sweats & Tees. In addition, they 
continued to be our volunteer force in the classrooms and Library Media Center. 

Through the Volunteer Coordinator of the Medfield Council On Aging we are delighted 
to have three senior citizen volunteers who provide much needed assistance the staff with 
copying and laminating 

The School Council continues to support the development of school goals, to provide 
input into the development of the school budget and to annually review the curriculum 
guides, Student/Parent Handbook, and Parent Information Night. 

Dale Street is fortunate to have such a committed and supportive group of parents and 
community members. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Kim L. Cave 
Principal 



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REPORT OF THE RALPH WHEELOCK SCHOOL 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

It is a pleasure to report on the school year ending December 31, 2006 in my third year as 
principal of the Ralph Wheelock School. 

As of October 1, 2006, our total enrollment of second and third grade students is 486 
students with eleven sections of grade two and eleven sections of grade three. Our school 
also is home to two collaborative programs, Project ACCEPT and The Education 
Collaborative. 

The Wheelock staff is an energetic and committed group of professionals who continue 
to hone their skills as educators committed to 'best practices' in the field. Of note in the 
area of professional development this year was the attendance by 15 members of our staff 
at the Literacy for All Conference sponsored by Lesley University. The Medfield Center 
for Public Education (MCPE) awarded us an $11,000 grant that allowed staff from all 
three elementary schools to attend this national conference. All were able to attend 
classes given by leaders in field of literacy such as Lucy Calkins, Irene Fountas and Gay 
Su Pinnel - and all returned from the conference with fresh ideas that translated easily 
into classroom practice. 

As a result of our continued study of best practices in literacy, this year saw the creation 
of a Leveled Book Room at Wheelock that is stocked with book sets for teachers to use 
with small groups of students. We, once again, received the support of MCPE in funding 
the start of the book room and will continue to stock it with a variety of titles and genres 
that will support the needs of all students. 

Our district initiative with Writer's Workshop, a model of teaching writing based on the 
work of Lucy Calkins, has become an integral part of our English Language Arts 
curriculum. The Writer's Workshop model utilizes a common language and approach to 
the teaching of writing across our elementary grade levels and our students continuously 
celebrate their success as authors. 

We have continued our study of 'best practices' in the area of math as well. We enjoy 
the support of the consultant hired by the district to study the principles of teaching 
mathematics with us and look forward to the arrival of new materials in the spring to 
support our math curriculum. 

Having received a boost in technology in the previous school year that allowed us to 
install 4 new computers in each classroom, we have also continued with our commitment 
to the integration of technology in the classrooms. Our Library Media Center staff, led 
by Susan Pope, continues to offer us their endless patience and expertise in bringing 



136 



technology to the classroom and in utilizing technology to promote efficiency in our 
workplace. 

Our physical plant has seen improvements with construction in preparation for the 
installation of a lift to the second floor as part of this year's capital plan, and with 
continued improvements to our playground. Our hard-working CSA continues with 
fundraising efforts toward the purchase of new playground equipment and we continue to 
be supported by the larger community with in-kind donations. Bevilaqua Paving 
generously donated their time and equipment to pave our basketball court and create a 
path for accessibility to our playground picnic area. The Department of Corrections work 
crew, through Sheriff Belotti's office, returned to Wheelock to perform a needed clean-up 
of our courtyard and assisted us with landscaping our grounds in preparation for the 
opening of school. 

Beyond physical improvements and our continued study of curriculum, we shared in 
many experiences this year that provided richness and depth to the Wheelock School 
experience. Our third graders once again transported themselves back in time with the 
annual trip to Rocky Woods. As a culmination of a study of the Colonial period, our 
students dress in period costume and spend the day as a child would have experienced 
life in the 17 th century. They fish, make a fire and prepare a stew, play period games and 
hike through the woods with 17 th century eyes. As you may imagine, the number of 
volunteers needed to support this experience for our students is enormous. As always, we 
are grateful to the many parents who offer their time in preparing and volunteering for 
this event. Special thanks to Diana Milesko who continues to chair this event for us even 
though her youngest Pilgrim has left third grade. 

Our school spirit shone through this year in support of the Medfield High School 
Warriors who won the Super Bowl for their division for the first time in Medfield history. 
Both head coach, Mike Slason, and assistant coach, Nick Stevens are the physical 
education teachers at Wheelock - and we were excited to support them on the road to 
victory. Our students participated in Spirit Days and arrived at school in varying shades 
of Medfield Blue, and we organized a surprise 'send-off for the team on the way to their 
first playoff game. Our entire student body stood outside as the players' buses passed 
through holding signs and cheering them on to victory. This event exemplifies the 
special 'connectedness' that is so typical of this great town and we were delighted to 
share in this event with our greater school community. 



137 



In sum, we have had yet another exciting and productive year at the Wheelock School. I 
continue to be greatly appreciative of the support given to our school by the Medfleld 
community and I look forward to another great year as the leader of such a terrific school. 



Respectfully submitted, 



Patricia A. Gorman 
Principal 




138 



REPORT OF THE MEMORIAL SCHOOL 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

As principal of the Memorial School, I respectfully submit my annual report for the 
school year ending December 31, 2006. This is my first annual report for the Town of 
Medfield. 

ENROLLMENT AND STAFF 

The Memorial school services students in our integrated preschool, kindergarten and 
grade one programs. Memorial's enrollment, as of October 1, 2006 totaled 423 students. 
This total is comprised of 50 preschoolers enrolled in morning and afternoon sessions, 
203 kindergarten students who attend morning, afternoon or full day sessions, and 220 
first grade students. 

We currently have ten half-day sessions of kindergarten and one full day session. This is 
the first year that a full day session has been offered at Memorial School. The full day 
classroom is an integrated model following the successful prototype of the Memorial 
School integrated preschool. There are eleven sessions of first grade. The average class 
size in kindergarten is 19; average class size in first grade is 20. 

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT 

The Memorial School staff continually strives to expand the learning opportunities 
provided to our students. To achieve this goal, teachers have participated in a variety of 
training opportunities through district-sponsored workshops, colleges and professional 
staff development organizations. The focus of our professional development has been in 
these main areas: Writers' Workshop, guided reading, and literacy assessment and 
intervention, web page development. 

The kindergarten faculty attended monthly in-house "literacy labs" to study and prepare 
materials for delivering guided reading lessons. The results of this effort are evident in 
every classroom. Teachers meet with small groups of youngsters instructing them on 
early literacy skills. In first grade, the guided reading program has been a staple for a few 
years, so the grade one staff received training in the Lucy Calkin's Writer's Workshop 
curriculum. After teachers became familiar with the content, professional development 
time was utilized to establish grade level pacing charts and assessment grids. Time was 
allotted for sharing student work with colleagues so that grade level expectations could 
be identified. 

To insure that all children are making adequate progress, both kindergarten and first 
grade staff established quarterly benchmarks for literacy. In addition, the Teacher 



139 



Support Team comprised of five teachers attended an outside workshop on response to 
intervention. The data provided quarterly, has been used to drive interventions and 
extensions in the classroom. Children identified as not meeting benchmarks are brought 
to the Teacher Support Team for intervention strategies. 

Memorial staff members also participated in technology training early in the school year. 
Teachers learned how to use TeacherWeb to create individual web pages. The software 
tool provides kid friendly icons and tools for organization of information. The staff 
reports on current curriculum, special events, and other noteworthy topics. Technology 
can have its challenges, but through the use of the on-line communication system, parents 
are checking in frequently to get news about their child's education. 

COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT 

Memorial School is most fortunate to have the remarkable involvement of parents and 
community members in our building at all times. Volunteers assist in our library, 
lunchroom, and classrooms. Senior citizens volunteer their time as greeters and bus 
monitors. The Memorial Community School Association (CSA) has raised funds for our 
visiting performers and artists, classroom literacy carts, and portable sound system. Most 
significantly, the Memorial CSA members raised enough money to completely update the 
main playground and the preschool playground. They took special care to insure that 
playground activities met safety requirements, were accessible to children with 
disabilities, and provided enough fun for the many children that use the equipment. We 
are also appreciative to the Medfield Coalition, Cantanese Children's Foundation, and 
New n' Town, all organizations who provided the extra finances to complete the project. 
In a day and age when childhood obesity and sedentary lifestyles are a concern, it is great 
to see hundreds of children engaged in activities that build strong, healthy bodies daily. 

The Memorial staff works closely with the CSA and MCPE to bring in authors, poets, 
and performers who will enhance our curriculum. Grace Lin and Lyn Littlefield Hoopes, 
children's author and poet, respectively, presented their works to the students. Ms. 
Hoopes then conducted a series of poetry workshops in each first grade classroom. The 
kindergarten children gain hands on experience when "Explore the Ocean" and 
"Dinosaurs" come to visit. We look forward to the return of Johnny the K each year to 
sing about respect, caring and friendship. 

From the day a child begins his/her experience at Memorial School, the process of 
understanding how he/she fits as member of a community begins. Through our Social 
Competency program, children learn about behavioral expectations, the importance of 
belonging, the ways to include others, and methods for problem solving. We celebrate 
our understanding of good character at our monthly Get Along Gatherings. The children, 
with guidance from their families and teachers, have participated in coin drives for 
charity, gently used book donations for needy schools, and Gifts for Kids charity. The 



140 



message is, "Not only is it better to give than to receive. If we each do a little, we can do 
a lot." 

We truly appreciate the generosity we experience here. The children benefit from the 
time and effort donated by so many caring individuals. 

FUTURE TRENDS 

For several years, our primary focus has been on updating the delivery of the English 
Language Arts program. We will continue to look for opportunities to provide support 
and intervention to young readers through the use of technology and folding in teaching 
techniques that reflect best practices. Plans for extending writing opportunities are being 
discussed. 

Beginning in the spring of '07, we will begin teacher training in the content area of Math. 
The "Investigations" math program will be introduced to students in the fall of 2007. 

The social development of our students remains an important focus for the upcoming 
year. The staff wishes to continue to improve opportunities to increase student self- 
awareness. Additionally, a parenting library is being established in conjunction with the 
current student library. Books offering advice to parents will be available to check out. 

As my first year as principal at the Memorial School unfolds, I feel most fortunate to 
work with a highly qualified and motivated staff. The community of Medfield continues 
to uphold its commitment to the education of its children. I feel most fortunate to be part 
of a community where contribution and investment of self are valued. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Andrea Trasher 
Principal 



141 



REPORT OF THE PUPIL SERVICES DEPARTMENT 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

I wish to submit my Pupil Services Department report for the year ending December 31, 
2006. 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 

The student enrollment in the special education program has remained consistent with the 
previous year, ages 6-12, and a decrease in the number of young children. 



Students 


Dec. 1,2005 


Dec. 


1,2006 


ages 3-5 


42 




31 


ages 6-17 


322 




324 


ages 18-21 


11 




13 




375 




368 



Most of our children receive their services within our school system as indicated below: 

Special Education Figures Only Dec. 1, 2005 

Grades K-5 139 

Grades 6-8 69 

Grades 9-12 101 

Collaborative Placements 1 1 

Private Day 18 

A five member Massachusetts Department of Education team visited the Medfleld 
Schools to evaluate the implementation of special education, Civil rights, and English 
Learner Education. The overall report was very positive. Of the 59 special education 
standards, 54 were fully implemented, 5 were partially implemented. All standards are 
now fully implemented. The team commended the level of expertise and professionalism 
among all staff members. 

PRESCHOOL 

The integrated preschool providers have six half day early childhood sessions servicing 
26 four year old and 26 three year old children. The preschool continues as a voting 
member of the Charles River Community Partnership Council. We are very pleased to 
report that the preschool has achieved NEAYC accreditation renewal. 



142 



GUIDANCE SERVICES 

The guidance program at Medfield High School provides enrichment for the whole 
student. Four counselors work with a caseload of students from their freshmen through 
senior year. This relationship is developed from the time that the freshmen transition into 
high school and lasts until their graduation and the plans that are developed following 
high school. The counselors work to aid students in fulfilling their emotional, academic, 
and social needs. The guidance curriculum continues to improve and refine its focus. 
With students facing anxiety around the transition from middle school to high school, the 
ninth grade guidance curriculum focuses on orientation, four year plans, goal setting, 
transcripts and making the most of high school. Sophomore year includes career 
exploration and a closer look at a student's learning style. Future planning, including 
college and career plans are the major focus in the eleventh grade. Senior year is 
dedicated to the college application process and how it relates to an individual student, 
finding and applying to jobs, colleges, and monetary assistance including scholarships 
and the transition from high school into college. With this structure in place, which 
builds off of the middle school curriculum, the guidance department continually improves 
its services to students and families as well as communication through newsletters, the 
website and other similar correspondence. 

HEALTH SERVICES 

Five full-time nurses provide services to children in the school system. The role of the 
school nurse continues to expand as the student population we serve faces a broad 
spectrum of complex health issues. The nurses are both caring and conscientious in 
providing services and maintaining a healthy school environment. 

The diverse role of the school nurse includes: care for children with medical special 
needs, participation at special education team meetings, conducting home visits as 
recommended by the school planning team, education on health issues for students, staff, 
and parents as well as performing state mandated screenings and monitoring state 
requirements such as physical examinations and immunizations. 

One hundred sixty-eight youngsters were screened for kindergarten last year with the 
assistance of school personnel and trained volunteers. We would like to thank the 
Medfield Eye Care, the Medfield Lions Club and the volunteers from the New England 
School of Optometry for all their assistance. Additional volunteers assisted our nurses in 
completing vision and hearing screening for children in preschool through grade 9. As 
always, we are very grateful for this assistance, without which we would be unable to 
conduct so many screenings in a timely way. 



143 



PERSONNEL 

The special education staff has several new members. At the high school level, Ms. 
Maurine McDermott is the new special educator, Ms. Janet Connolly now serves as one 
of our nurses and Ms. Stephanie Finley is replacing Amanda Samaha, who relocated out 
of state, as guidance counselor. At the middle school, Mr. Jay Wasserman is the new 
special educator and Ms. Tricia Williams is the newly appointed nurse. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Kathleen McArdle 
Director of Pupil Services 



144 



REPORT OF THE ATHLETIC DIRECTOR 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

I respectfully submit my annual report as the athletic director for the Medfield Public 
Schools for the year ending December 31, 2006. 

It is my pleasure to report that for the twelfth year in a row over seventy-five percent of 
the student body participated in athletics. This statistic reaffirms the integral part 
athletics play in our school and the education of our children. 

My goal will be to continue to emphasize the tradition of sportsmanship, which has been 
our history here in Medfield. Fair play, competition, goal setting, team work, are just a 
few of the life lessons that athletics can teach. Athletics truly is the other half of 
education. 

We offer 27 varsity interscholastic sports to our students. This year we won nine Tri 
Valley League Championships, and 74% of all our contests. This was the best winning 
percentage in the league. We won the Larry Ames Award for the second consecutive 
year. This award is given each year to the town with the best winning percentage in the 
state in our division, based on school population. This is the fourth time in seven years 
that we have won this prestigious award. We all take great pride in this accomplishment. 

Boys and girls interscholastic teams were offered at three levels during the past year. The 
following is the entire athletic coaching staff by season: 

WINTER 



Basketball (Boys) 



Varsity 
Junior Varsity 
Freshman 



Herb Grace 
Michael Mason 
Al Necchi 



Basketball (Girls) 



Cheering 
Ice Hockey 



Varsity 

Junior Varsity 
Freshman 



Varsity 
Junior Varsity 



Mark Nickerson 
Tara Dunn 
Paul Coutinho 
Harry Rose 

Georganne Gerlach 

John Panciocco 
Doug Kay 
James Woods 
Rich Kelleher 



145 



Indoor Track (Boys) 
Indoor Track (Girls) 




Nicholas Stevens 
Brian Gavaghan 
Matt Cherner 


Gymnastics 


Varsity 
Assistant 


Michelle Hopping 
Bill Matyskiel 


Swimming 


Varsity 
Assistant 

SPRING 


Vicky Buccholz 
Alena Buchholz 


Baseball 


Varsity 
Junior Varsity 
Freshman 


Mark Nickerson 
Matt Marenghi 
Tom Morin 


Softball 


Varsity 
Junior Varsity 


Johanna Madge 
Kathy Brophy 
Erik Ormberg 


Tennis (Boys) 


Varsity 
Assistant 


Vincent Joseph 
Andy Delery 


Tennis (Girls) 


Varsity 
Assistant 


Ross Irwin 
Jessica Kirby 


Track and Field (Boys) 


Varsity 


Michael Kraemer 
Bernie Shea 
Brian Gavaghan 


Track and Field (Girls) 


Varsity 


Michael Slason 
Carol Bauer 
Main Reynolds 


Volleyball (Boys) 


Varsity 


John Hastings 


Lacrosse (Boys) 
Lacrosse (Girls) 


Varsity 

Junior Varsity 

Varsity 
Junior Varsity 


Robert Aronson 
Steve Schairer 
Michael Douglas 
Rich Lousararian 
Sara Burman 
Jason Heim 



146 



FALL 



Cheering 




Georganne Gerlach 


Golf 


Varsity 
Junior Varsity 


George Callahan 
Al Keith 


Cross Country 


Varsity 


Michael Kraemer 
Bernie Shea 


Cross Country 


Varsity 


Miranda Whitmore 
Diane Lyons 


Field Hockey 


Varsity 
Junior Varsity 
Freshman 


Mike Mason 
Kerry Leach 
Sue Pratt 


Football 


Varsity 

Junior Varsity 
Freshman 


Mike Slason 
Nick Stevens 
Erik Ormberg 
Brian Gavaghan 
Vin Joseph 


Soccer (Boys) 


Varsity 
Junior Varsity 
Freshman 


Jason Heim 
Paul Coutinho 
Travis Taliffero 


Soccer (Girls) 


Varsity 
Junior Varsity 
Freshman 


Kristen Smith 
Kelly Dengos 
Melinda Tufel 


Volleyball (Girls) 


Varsity 
Junior Varsity 
Junior Varsity II 


John Hastings 
Sarah Buckley 
Monique Goodrow 



All of our interscholastic teams participate in the Tri-Valley League which consists of 
Ashland, Bellingham, Dover-Sherborn, Holliston, Hopkinton, Medfield, Medway, Millis 
Norton and Westwood. Medfield is currently ranked fourth in the TVL in total 
enrollment, grades nine through twelve. The league is highly competitive in all sports, 
boys and girls. Tri-Valley teams traditionally are quite successful in state tournament 
play. 

Our athletic highlights begin with the winter season, 2005-2006. The girls basketball 
team had a 12-8 regular season record. Molly Barrett was a first team All league player. 



147 



The girls qualified for state tournament play for the seventeenth year in a row. Our boys 
team finished their season with a 16-4 record, good for first place in the league. Girls 
indoor track won the TVL for the first time in eight years with a 7-0 record. Our coach 
Matt Cherner was the Tri Valley coach of the year. Our boys indoor track team was 5-2, 
and place second in the league. The ice hockey team's record was 15-4-1, good for first 
place in the league. Our girls swim team was 4-4 on the season. The boys swim team was 
4-6 in a very competitive league. Our girl's gymnastics finished their season at 3-7. 

The spring of 2006 was another successful season for our Warriors. Softball had a 12-8 
record and battled for a league title. Our baseball team finished 13-7, really turning their 
program around with a young team. Our girl's tennis team was 17-0, and were league 
champions. The boys tennis team finished 14-3 and qualified again for the state 
tournament for the seventeenth consecutive year. Boys track finished the season 
undefeated 8-1, and won their fifth consecutive league title. Our girls track team finished 
8-1, finishing second in the TVL. The boys lacrosse team had a remarkable season. They 
finished with an 18-2 record and won the league for the sixth year in a row. Luke 
Aronson was selected as a Globe and Herald All Scholastic player. Bob Aronson was 
voted Tri Valley coach of the year. The girls lacrosse team had a tremendous season 
finishing 11-5, and qualified for the state tournament for the sixth year in a row. The boys 
volleyball team had some great late season wins with a young team, and look forward to 
good things in the future. 

Fall 2006 was very exciting for our Warrior teams. The girls volleyball won the TVL with 
a 22-1 mark. For the second year in a row, the team won the State Championship! Lauren 
Barrett was selected as a Globe All Scholastic, and MVP of the league. Lauren and Bri 
Whalen were selected to be Herald All Scholastic All Stars. The football team finished 
the season with a 14-1 record. They won the league title for the first time in 37 years, and 
were the first Medfield High School team to win a Super Bowl title! Mike Lane was 
voted offensive player of the year, and Alex Lines was voted the most valuable player of 
the league. Field hockey won fourth third league title in five years going 14-3-3. Heather 
Quadir was the most valuable player of the league. Boy's soccer finished their season 13- 
3-2, and just missed winning the league title. Our girls soccer program had a great 
season, and finished 10-3-5, they were third in the league. Both our boys and girls cross- 
country teams had outstanding seasons. The boys cross country team was undefeated 
again this year. The girls finished at 6-1. Our golf team had a 13-5-1 record. 

The annual All Sports Banquet, sponsored by the Medfield Boosters, was held in early 
June at Raffael's in Walpole. An audience of over 400 student athletes, coaches and 
parents were treated to a very special evening including the seventh annual Thomas Reis 
Sportsmanship Award which was presented this year to Molly Barrett and John Galvin. 
At the banquet, in addition to the individual sport MVP awards, Amy Skerry and Zach 
Nolan were named the 2005-2006 Scholar Athlete recipients. Medfield High School's 
"Wall of Fame" inductees were Jennifer Picardo, class of 1998 and Ryan Shean, class of 
1996. 



148 



At the June graduation exercises, Kevin Lynch 
recipients of the School Boosters Spirit Award, 
selections for 2005-2006 are as follows: 

Boys Basketball 
Girls Basketball 
Ice Hockey 



and Mary Kate Heavey were named 
First Team Tri-Valley League All-Star 



Jeff Altimar 

Molly Barrett 

Ted Bouchard 
Chris O'Rourke 



Matt Reardon 



Steve Lang 



Boys Indoor Track 
Girls Indoor Track 



Swimming 
Gymnastics 
Baseball 
Softball 
Girls Tennis 

Boys Tennis 
Boys Track 



Jamie Wulforst 

Karyn Moss 
Meghan Krupka 
Kristen Marshall 
Casey Armstrong 
Lauren Melaugh 

Meghan Nowak 

Tori Carpenito 

Kevin Lynch 

Lyndsey Colvin 

Christen Cadigan 
Kendra Kenny 

Tom Nowak 

Dan O'Connell 
Andrew Calivas 



Bud Stevens 

Anna Garrison 
Laura Bock 
Amy Skerry 
RachelO'Shea 



Ryan Heide 



Catie Ryan 
Stephanie Porcaro 



Zach Nolan 
Mike Ashcroft 



Girls Track 



Boys Volleyball 



Caitlin Barrett 
Karyn Moss 
Meghan Krupka 
Casey Armstrong 

Scott Maxon 



Lauren Barrett 
Bri Whalen 
Erin Haggerty 
Emily Wilson 



149 



Boys Lacrosse 



Girls Lacrosse 

Golf 

Boys Cross Country 

Girls Cross Country 
Field Hockey 

Boys Soccer 



Girls Soccer 
Football 



Volleyball (Girls) 



Luke Aronson 
C.J. Estes 
Mat Reardon 
Jake McCampbell 

Maggie Carey 
Mary Kate Heavey 

C.J. Estes 

Chris LaPlante 
Dan O'Connell 

Marissa Pendergast 

Heather Quadir 
Meaghan Sullivan 

Sean Kiley 
Ben Pantuck 

Jackie Cardarelli 
Jamie Wulforst 
Bud Stevens 
Josh Minsky 

Lauren Barrett 
Caitlin Barrett 



Brian DiPisa 
Eric Thompson 
Chris Hendy 



Courtney Lennon 

Kevin Recco 
Dave Aigler 

Lindsay Elcock 
Dana Goldense 



Austin Read 
Jon Hunter 

Emily Tunney 
Mike Lane 
Alex Lines 
Mike Welch 

Bri Whalen 
Arielle Pocock 



Our cheering teams under the guidance Georganne Gerlach were, as always, talented and 
creative. Our cheerleaders contribute to the athletic program's success by providing 
leadership, support and much enthusiasm to our teams, spectators and community. Year 
after year, their cheering and dance routines are without equal in the Tri- Valley League. 
The night before Thanksgiving was a special event this year. We had our annual bon fire, 
and celebrated our volleyball state championship, and our football league title, with a 
parade on the fire trucks. A large crowd cheered the festivities! This was followed by our 
annual alumni touch football tournament. 



150 



This concludes my annual report as the Director of Athletics. On behalf of all the 
Warriors, I would like to thank the School Committee, the administration, the Medfield 
School Boosters and the community for all of their support throughout the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Jon Kirby 
Director of Athletics 



151 



REPORT OF THE MEDFIELD COMMUNITY 
EDUCATION PROGRAM 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

The Community Education Program continued its tradition of offering a wide variety of 
classes designed to meet the needs of our students and adult learners. This year the scope 
of the adult education program grew significantly. The programs now included in the 
community education program include: 

ADULT EDUCATION 

The brochure comes out twice a year and offers a diverse selection of courses looking to 
meet the needs of the Medfield community. There are four major categories in our 
brochure. They include career and financial planning, exercise, sports and activities, 
instructional courses and a trip and travel section. We hope to add more courses in the 
future. Any ideas or suggestions would be greatly appreciated. 

TEACHER WELLNESS PROGRAMS 

These courses were designed to relieve stress, and improve the mental and emotional 
health of our faculty. Trips were planned, professional golf instruction was offered and 
exercise classes, including Pilates, yoga and spinning were scheduled to meet the needs 
of our teachers and staff. 

INTRAMURALS 

The goal of the intramural program was to offer activities to all our children. The 
popular fun and fitness programs in the Memorial and Wheelock Schools were expanded. 
The programs in the Dale St. School and the Blake Middle School continued to thrive. 
The Medfield High School program centered on our new fitness room and offered 
activities before and after school. 

EXTENDED DAY PROGRAMS 

These programs, offered in the Memorial, Wheelock and Dale St. Schools, were designed 
with working parents in mind. Programs were offered in each school starting at 7:00.a.m. 
The after school portion of our program was operated in conjunction with our fun and 
fitness intramural programs. 



152 



SUMMER EXPERIENCE 

This program is directed by Kim Estes and run out of the Memorial School during the 
summer months. The tradition of excellence has continued and will be enhanced by a full 
day program this summer and the addition of Herb Grace as a co-director. 

We look forward to the future of the community education program, and what it can offer 
to all the citizens of Medfield. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Jon Kirby 
Director 



153 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING 

DECEMBER 31, 2006 



154 



BIRTHS 2006 








JANUARY 




MAY 


1/2 


Talia R Macchi 


5/4 


Brayden A Leonard 


1/5 


Theo D Papadinoff 


5/4 


Catherine M Bannister 


1/6 


Samantha A Zapolin 


5/5 


Matthew Q Stevens 


1/6 


Matthew F George 


5/5 


Chloe P McCormack 


1/9 


Nicholas G Hasapidis 


5/6 


Michael P Long 


1/13 


Vincent A Roman 


5/9 


Izabelle H Andre 


1/18 


Andrew A McCarthy 


5/10 


Chloe C Spitzer 


1/18 


Logan T Corbett 


5/11 


Quinn O Maley 


1/19 


Zachary E Palmer 


5/12 


Sophie E Compston 


1/29 


Michael C Iannone 


5/13 


Katelyn R Nicotera 


1/27 


David M Wilson 


5/16 


Michael K Perachi 


1/31 


Timothy Q Thomas 


5/22 


George L Polihronis 






5/26 


Isabel L Marsette 




FEBRUARY 


5/29 


Maximos S O'Brien 


2/3 


Bailey C Mead 


5/31 


Michaela Melish 


2/6 


Ariana Z Mycroft 






2/17 


Brendan M Hagwood 




JUNE 


2/23 


Brandon L Popper 


6/2 


Joseph P Bartolotta 


2/24 


Herrick J Swirbalus 


6/4 


Madeleine F Driscoll 


2/27 


Katherine N Flippo 


6/5 


Elizabeth M Sullivan 






6/6 


Eric D Bomfim 




MARCH 


6/6 


Kyle L Baden 


3/1 


Olivia L Sandrew 


6/8 


Marco S Benson 


3/6 


Sean R Watts 


6/9 


John M Barrette 


3/13 


Emily E Soucy 


6/10 


Abraham W Jacoby 


3/14 


Mason C Lau 


6/10 


Ava K Aldrich 


3/15 


John B Nozzolillo 


6/11 


Joshua O Danzig 


3/17 


Tamlyn L Shu 


6/15 


Chandler G McClements 


3/23 


Katherine M Turner 


6/17 


Charlotte M Cooney 


3/23 


Nathan S Adolph 


6/19 


Emelia R Didomenico 


3/30 


Ciara L Naughton 


6/19 


Anwarr Q Thompson 






6/26 


Kyle W Hudson 




APRIL 


6/30 


Michael G Lyons 


4/10 


Sebastian S Hart 






4/10 


Thomas C Waters 




JULY 


4/15 


Irini Z Kolovos 


7/9 


Aaron J Ravech 


4/18 


Richard M Bradbury, III 


7/11 


Jill M Depiero 


4/23 


Nicholas S Shahinian 


7/13 


Marco R Musto 


4/26 


Quinn R Wise 


7/14 


John P Olenik 


4/27 


Garrison F Lydon 


7/18 


Sara M Hilvert 






7/22 


Ava J Walsh 






7/24 


Ethan E Andes 






7/25 


Noah R Manchand 



155 



7/25 


Matthew A Clarke 


7/30 


William M Bergland 


7/31 


Nathaniel E Cunningham 




AUGUST 


8/1 


Kathryn A Buckley 


8/9 


Griffin T Rubino 


8/11 


Kyle T Kraemer 


8/12 


Alyssa A Cook 


8/12 


Ava R Jowdy 


8/16 


Sarah P Cumming 


8/24 


Mary S Palladino 


8/26 


Emily F Skerry 




SEPTEMBER 


9/4 


Kendall B Herrick 


9/10 


Anita C Rodriguez 


9/14 


Sabin Dhital 


9/27 


Addison M Kido 


9/29 


Sarah M Labaer 




OCTOBER 


10/2 


Juliet C Lane 


10/3 


Brady A Palladino 


10/4 


Nolan A Joyce 


10/11 


Zachary B Gross 


10/24 


Madelyn D Hennessy 


10/29 


Anna K Levangie 


10/30 


Kayla Hanna 




NOVEMBER 


11/1 


Luke T Gobin 


11/16 


Jack J Driscoll 


11/24 


Cole A Lebiednik 


11/24 


Benjamin D Coulombe 


11/27 


Ella C Mulready 


11/27 


Ian T Reddy 




DECEMBER 


12/4 


Lila S Garverich 


12/13 


James D Sherman 


12/15 


Cynthia L Wilson 


12/19 


Mason A Cira 


12/20 


Joshua E McMahon 



156 



MARRIAGES 2006 





JANUARY 


8/5 


Allan J Larkin 


1/1 


Amanda M Surette 




Kelley A Bernier 




Stephen M Smith 


8/5 


Lindsay R Totaro 


1/3 


Harry L McCombs 




Thomas P Doyle 




Joan V McCombs 


8/19 


Mary Toffoloni 


1/7 


Paul J Loiacono 




George Mellen, Jr 




Maryellen Mitchell 


8/26 


Sean P McCarthy 
Courtney A DiSchino 




MARCH 






3/25 


David Gross 




SEPTEMBER 




Lori B Berke 


9/2 


Mary C Georgacopoulos 
Stephen M Scribner 




APRIL 


9/16 


Susan Traks 


4/8 


Robert A Shakotko 




Walter MMello,Jr 




Deborah B Grabbe 


9/16 


Dale M Jolliffe 
Sarah R Howell 




MAY 


9/23 


John W Dorman 


5/20 


Charles F McWhinnie 




Karen A Zamek 




Jeanine A Duhamel 


9/23 


Melissa A Savilonis 
Ryan A Stuart 




JUNE 


9/23 


Deirdra A Sauter 


6/10 


Eileen F DeSorgher 




Brian T Dickson 




Brian A Flynn 


9/23 


Robert P Riggins 


6/11 


Amar K Baruni 




Kerry A Dooley 




Diana S Beedy 


9/30 


Katherine A Bupp 
Stephen M Feldman 




JULY 


9/30 


Brian K McManus 


7/1 


Anne C Ford 




Dianne E Faro 




Matthew W Donovan 


9/30 


Francis A Frey, Jr 


7/1 


Ryan M Cellucci 
Alissa R Saltzman 




Sarah D Mortimer 


7/2 


Spencer S Christie 




OCTOBER 




Colleen J Brown 


10/7 


Jeffrey M Carter 


7/3 


Sean R Murphy 
Lisa M Cross 




Sara E Cocci 


7/8 


Timothy M McCarthy 




NOVEMBER 




Lynsey J Moore 


11/4 


Donald G Nyren 


7/15 


Lauren M Burchill 




Lisa B Fitzgerald 




Brian G Lebiednik 


11/5 


Kelly R Mitchell 
Adam F Dennis 




AUGUST 


11/25 


John A O'Connell III 


8/5 


Stephen Anthony Helal 
Marissa L Pochebit 




Janet H Ledogar 



157 



DECEMBER 

+2/31 KathrynEHall 

William J Mullally 



158 



DEATHS 2006 








JANUARY 


6/10 


Judith G Graham 


1/1 


GarthS Moss 


6/11 


Michael V Hennahane 


1/3 


Dominica A Allen 


6/12 


John E Clark 


1/11 


Phillip B Rogers 


6/12 


Eleanor Mitchell 


1/12 


Renee Collins 


6/13 


Annie M Rogers 


1/27 


Rita E Sanford 


6/14 


Mary V McFarland 






6/18 


Kathryn A Yakel 




FEBRUARY 


619 


Anastasia Mulvoy 


2/2 


Anthony A Tripoli 


6/22 


Charlotte A Donahue 


2/3 


Katherine G Mayer 






2/6 


Carol M Villa 




JULY 


2/7 


Catherine M Murphy 


7/12 


Robert V Savoie 


2/16 


Alfred A Sanfilippo 


7/16 


Dianne B Orpen 






7/23 


Paul D Frawley 




MARCH 


7/24 


Louis DeFronzo 


3/2 


John M Nevers Sr 


7/26 


Harold G Bell 


3/3 


Patricia M Corbett 






3/6 


John W Adamson 




AUGUST 


3/7 


Marvin G Chambers 


8/16 


Arline M Grenier 


3/11 


Janine M O' Toole 


8/17 


Gordon S Youlden 


3/19 


Ida Schapira 


8/20 


Mary Walsh 


3/24 


William H Bowman IV 


8/26 


Anthony P Iafolla 


3/28 


Thomas E Leary 






3/29 


Sally M Shaw 




SEPTEMBER 






9/8 


William A Werneken 




APRIL 


9/30 


Arthur R Stagg 


4/1 


Dorothy A Pritoni 


9/13 


Marie D Lowney 


4/15 


James T Regan 


9/17 


Ellen A Curtis 


4/17 


Frances S Gillis 


9/28 


Ellis L Phillips Jr 


4/19 


Dorothy R Mandigo 






4/26 


Nora T Saunders 




OCTOBER 


4/28 


Dominic Macadino 


10/5 


Margaret L Guaragna 






10/6 


Rose Russell 




MAY 


10/8 


George M Sherman 


5/2 


Elizabeth E Temple 


10/10 


Josephine R Brown 


5/4 


Frederick J Dorgan 


10/11 


Raymond A Dignard 


5/9 


Fredric C Temple 


10/14 


Maria P Huskins 


5/10 


Angelina M Pedroli 


10/14 


Mary E Sheehan 


5/21 


Florence E Vollmuth 


10/16 


Myrtle T Brady 


5/24 


Albert L Clark II 


10/19 


Mary K Kerrigan 


5/28 


Audrey C Cooper 
JUNE 







159 



NOVEMBER 

11/3 Adele Dumont 

1 1/8 Raffaela R Vasaturo 

1 1/10 Richard T Vaughn 

11/16 Lawrence P Shlonsky 

11/27 OmerRGodin 

DECEMBER 

12/1 Marjorie H Withe 

12/6 Geraldine M Rogers 

12/8 OlgaPDiaz 

12/8 Lucille A Conlon 

12/16 Harriet S Bryning 

1 2/22 George T Goularte 

1 2/29 Maryellen M Valzania 

12/30 Roberta A Brown 



160 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION 

MARCH 27, 2006 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, the polls were opened at 6:00 A.M. with reading of 
the warrant and the swearing in of the election workers present. The ballot boxes were 
inspected and found to be in working order, specimen ballots posted, voting list was 
displayed and instruction to the voters posted. 

WARDEN: G. Marshall Chick 
ASST. WARDEN: Angelo Allegretto 

TELLERS: Michael Costa, Ruth Chick, John Hand, Emmy Mitchell, Rita Allegretto, 
Jane Timmerman and Sandy Williams 

The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 

The total vote was 163. There are 7818 registered voters, 2% of voters voting. 

PRECINCT 





1 


2 


3 


4 


TOTAL 


MODERATOR (one yr) VOTE FOR ONE 












Scott F. McDermott 


28 


41 


39 


41 


149 


Write In 












Blanks 


5 


5 


4 




14 
163 


TOWN CLERK (three yrs) VOTE FOR ONE 












Carol A. Mayer 


27 


40 


36 


39 


142 


Write In 


2 






1 


3 


Blanks 


4 


6 


7 


1 


18 
163 


SELECTMEN (three yrs) VOTE FOR ONE 












Osier Peterson 


22 


33 


33 


31 


119 


Write In 


1 


3 




2 


6 


Blanks 


10 


10 


10 


8 


38 
163 



ASSESSOR (three yrs) VOTE FOR ONE 

Bruce Beardsley 27 38 35 39 139 

Write In 

Blanks 6 8 8 2 24 

163 



161 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE (three yrs) VOTE FOR 












ONE 












Susan Ruzzo 


26 


37 


34 


37 


134 


Write In 












Blanks 


7 


9 


9 


4 


29 
163 


LIBRARY TRUSTEE (three yrs) VOTE FOR 












NOT MORE THAN TWO 












Maura McNicholas 


26 


38 


35 


34 


133 


Jane Ready 


25 


42 


38 


38 


143 


Write In 












Blanks 


15 


12 


13 


10 


50 
326 


PLANNING BOARD (five yrs) VOTE FOR ONE 












Stephen Browne 


27 


39 


32 


39 


137 


Write In 












Blanks 


6 


7 


11 


2 


26 
163 


PLANNING BOARD (one yr) VOTE FOR ONE 












Keith Diggans 


27 


37 


35 


34 


133 


Write In 












Blanks 


6 


9 


8 


7 


30 
163 


PARK COMMISSIONER (three yrs) VOTE 












FOR ONE 












Thomas A. Caragliano 


25 


37 


32 


31 


125 


Write In 


3 


2 




5 


10 


Blanks 


5 


7 


11 


5 


28 
163 


TRUST FUND COMMISSIONER (three yrs) 












VOTE FOR ONE 












Georgia Colivas 


3 


7 


2 


4 


16 


Write In 


1 




3 




4 


Blanks 


29 


39 


38 


37 


143 
163 



After the results were announced, the checked ballots, voting lists and tally sheets 
were turned over to the Town Clerk for safekeeping as prescribed by law. 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 
Carol A. Mayer, CMC/CMMC S\ 
TOWN CLERK 

March 28, 2006 

162 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 
WARRANT FOR THE ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

2006 



Norfolk, ss. 

To the Constables of the Town of Medfield in said County, Greetings: 
In the Name of the Commonwealth, you are directed to notify and warn the inhabitants 
of the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections and in town affairs, to meet at 
the Ralph Wheelock School gymnasium, located on Elm Street in said Medfield, on 
MONDAY, the twenty-seventh day of March, A.D., 2006 at 6:00 o'clock A.M., then 
and there to act upon the following articles: 

Article 1. To choose all Town Officers required to be elected annually by ballot, viz: 

One Moderator for one year. 

One Town Clerk for a term of three years. 

One Selectman, one Assessor, one member of the School Committee, two Trustees of 

the Public Library, one Park and Recreation Commissioner and one Trust Fund 

Commissioner each for a term of three years. 

Two members of the Planning Board for a term of five years. 

The polls will be open at 6:00 o'clock A.M. and shall be closed at 8:00 o'clock P.M. 

On MONDAY the twenty-fourth of April, A.D., 2006, commencing at 7:30 P.M. the 
following articles will be acted on in the Amos Clark Kingsbury High School 
Auditorium, located on South Street in said Medfield, viz. 

Article 2. To see if the Town will vote to accept the reports of the several Town 
Officers for the past year. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

It was so VOTED (Consent Calendar 4/24/2006) 

Article 3. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Treasurer/Collector to use all 
means in the collection of taxes as the Treasurer/Collector might if elected to that 
office. 

(Treasurer/Collector) 

It was so VOTED (Consent Calendar 4/24/2006) 



163 



Article 4. To see if the Town will vote to accept the following named sums as 
Perpetual Trust Funds for the care of lots in the Vine Lake Cemetery, the interest 
thereof as may be necessary for said care, viz. 

PERPETUAL CARE 2005 



Karl Whelan 


$ 


1,100.00 


Brenda Elliot 


$ 


1,100.00 


Kathleen Ledbetter 


$ 


2,200.00 


Mary P. Luciano 


$ 


1,100.00 


William & Dorothy Small 


$ 


1,100.00 


Richard Drahos 


$ 


1,100.00 


M. Pamela Gallo 


$ 


2,200.00 


Joseph Lavita 


$ 


2,200.00 


Michael McGowan 


$ 


1,100.00 


Robert Beksha & Nancy Deamess 


$ 


3,300.00 


John T. Downing & Mary Downing 


$ 


2,200.00 


Leland & Joan Berg 


$ 


2,200.00 


Janet Krueger 


$ 


550.00 


Ann W. McDonald 


$ 


1,100.00 


Sharon L Norgaard 


$ 


1,100.00 


Eric M. Perkins 


$ 


2.200.00 


Allen M. Bowles 


$ 


1 ,000.00 


Roger Laakso 


$ 


2,200.00 


Joseph LaVita 


$ 


1,100.00 


Judith B. Brady 


$ 


550.00 


Martha O'Connell 


$ 


2,200.00 


Jean Dunn 


$ 


2,200.00 


Diane M. Brienze 


$ 


2,200.00 



TOTAL 



37,300.00 



It was so VOTED (Consent Calendar 4/24/2006) 



(Cemetery Commission) 



Article 5. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of G.L. Chapter 44, 
Section 53E X A to provide for a Fire Alarm revolving fund to be used for fire alarm 
maintenance, equipment or supplies, funds not to exceed $32,000 to come from the 
Maintenance Fee account and to authorize the Fire Chief to expend from said funds, or 
do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Fire Chief) 



164 



It was so VOTED (Consent Calendar 4/24/2006) 

Article 6. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of G.L. Chapter 44, 
Section 53E Vi to provide for an Ambulance revolving fund to be used for payment of 
principal and interest costs on the ambulance, funds not to exceed $45,000 to come 
from the Ambulance Mileage Fee Account and to authorize the Fire Chief to expend 
from said funds, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Fire Chief) 

It was so VOTED (Consent Calendar 4/24/2006) 

Article 7. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of G.L. Chapter 44, 
Section 53E Vi to provide for an Advanced Life Support fund to be used for the 
payment of Advanced Life Support charges, funds not to exceed $30,000 to come 
from the users of said services or their insurers and to authorize the Fire Chief to 
expend from said funds, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Fire Chief) 

It was so VOTED (Consent Calendar 4/24/2006) 

Article 8. To see if the Town will vote to vote to accept the provisions of G.L. 
Chapter 44, Section 53E Vi to provide for a Community Gardens revolving fund to be 
used for the payment of expenses for the operation of the Community Gardens 
program, funds not to exceed $800 to come from registration fees paid by gardeners 
and to authorize the Town Administrator to expend from said funds, or do or act 
anything in relation thereto. 

(Town Administrator) 

It was so VOTED (Consent Calendar 4/24/2006) 

Article 9. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of section four of 
Chapter 73 of the Acts of 1986 providing for an additional exemption for a taxpayer 
who shall otherwise qualify for an exemption under clauses 17D, 22, 22A, 22B, 22C. 
22D, 22E, 37A, 41 C, 42 or 43 of section five of Chapter 59 of the General Laws, 
which shall be uniform for all exemptions and none of which shall exceed one 
hundred per cent of said exemption for which he qualifies; provided, however, that in 
no instance shall the taxable valuation of such property, after all applicable 
exemptions, be reduced below ten percent of its full and fair cash valuation except 
through the application of section 8 A of Chapter 58 or clause 18 of section 5 of 
Chapter 59 of the General Laws and provided further, that the additional exemption 
shall not result in any taxpayer paying less than the taxes paid in the preceding fiscal 
year except through the application of section 8A of Chapter 58 or clause 18 of section 
5 of chapter 59 of the General Laws. The provisions of this section shall apply to the 
fiscal year 2007,or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

165 



(Board of Assessors) 



It was so VOTED (Consent Calendar 4/24/2006) 



Article 10. To see if the Town will authorize the Board of Assessors to raise the 
minimum personal property assessed value from the current $3,000 to $5,000, or do or 
act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Assessors) 

It was so VOTED (4/24/2006) 

Article 11. To see if the Town will vote to set a rate of 5% for the interest due on 
deferred real estate taxes in accordance with the provisions of Massachusetts General 
Laws, Chapter 59, Section 5, sub-paragraph (1) of Clause Forty-first A, as amended 
by Section 1 of Chapter 136 of the Acts of 2005, or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. 



(Board of Assessors) 



It was so VOTED (4/24/2006) 



Article 12. To see if the Town will vote to fix the salary and compensation of the 
following elected officers: Moderator, Town Clerk, Selectmen, Assessors, School 
Committee, Trustees of the Public Library, Parks and Recreation Commissioners, 
Planning Board, Housing Authority and Trust Fund Commissioners, or do or act 
anything in relation thereto. 



Officer 


Present Salarv W.( 


2. Recommends 


Town Clerk 


$48,540 


$49,996 


Selectmen, Chairman 


900 


900 


Selectmen, Clerk 


900 


900 


Selectmen, Third Member 


900 


900 


Assessors, Chairman 


900 


900 


Assessors, Clerk 


900 


900 


Assessors, Third Member 


900 


900 


Moderator 








Housing Authority 








School Committee 








Library Trustees 








Planning Board 








Park and Recreation Commissioners 








Trust Fund Commissioners 









(Board of Selectmen) 



166 



VOTED: That the Town fix the salary and compensation of the following elected 
officers: Moderator, Town Clerk, Selectmen, Assessors, School Committee, Trustees 
of the Public Library, Parks and Recreation Commissioners, Planning Board, Housing 
Authority and Trust Fund Commissioners as follows: 



Officer 


Present Salary 


W.C. Recommends 


Town Clerk 


$48,540 


$50,996 


Selectmen, Chairman 


900 


900 


Selectmen, Clerk 


900 


900 


Selectmen, Third Member 


900 


900 


Assessors, Chairman 


900 


900 


Assessors, Clerk 


900 


900 


Assessors, Third Member 


900 


900 


Moderator 








Housing Authority 








School Committee 








Library Trustees 








Planning Board 








Park and Recreation Commissioners 








Trust Fund Commissioners 








MOTION CARRIES (4/24/2006) 







Article 13. To see if the Town will vote to accept provisions of Chapter 41, Section 
19K of the Massachusetts General Laws, which provides for additional compensation 
for any Town Clerk, who has completed the necessary courses of study and training 
and has been awarded a Certificate by the Massachusetts Town Clerks' Association as 
a Certified Massachusetts Municipal Clerk, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Town Clerk) 

VOTED: TO DISMISS THIS ARTICLE - MOTION CARRIES (4/24/2006) 

Article 14. To see if the Town will vote to amend the PERSONNEL 
ADMINISTRATION PLAN and CLASSIFICATION OF POSITIONS AND PAY 
SCHEDULE, effective July 1, 2006 to read set forth in the warrant, or do or act 
anything in relation thereto. 

(Personnel Board) 



167 



PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION PLAN CLASSIFICATION OF POSITIONS 

AND PAY SCHEDULE 



POLICE DEPARTMENT AS PER CONTRACT: 
FIVE YEAR STEP PLAN 



Sergeant 
7/01/06 

bi weekly 


Min 

942.88 
1,885.76 


Step 2 

981.56 
1,963.12 


Step 3 

1,028.43 
2,056.87 


Step 4 


Max 

1,126.04 
2,252.08 


Police Officer 
7/01/06 

bi weekly 


740.35 
1,480.69 


792.27 
1,584.54 


853.17 
1,706.35 


910.04 
1,820.07 


946.27 
1,892.54 


Senior Dispatcher 
7/01/06 

bi weekly 


631.98 
1,263.97 


664.14 
1,328.28 


701.54 
1,403.07 


709.23 
1,418.45 


778.42 
1,556.83 


Dispatcher 
7/01/06 

bi weekly 


568.93 
1,137.85 


601.65 
1,203.31 


632.00 
1,263.99 


664.14 
1,328.28 


701.62 
1,403.24 


EIGHT STEP PLAN 













Sergeant Min Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 Step 5 Step 6 Step 7 Max 

7/01/06 942.88 961.76 990.59 1,000.59 1,020.58 1,040.99 1,061.79 1,126.04 

biweekly 1,885.76 1,923.52 1,981.17 2,001.19 2,041.16 2,081.98 2,123.59 2,252.08 

Police Officer 

7/01/06 740.35 762.53 785.40 808.98 849.37 874.88 901.09 946.27 

biweekly 1,480.69 1,525.06 1,570.79 1,617.95 1,698.74 1,749.77 1,802.17 1,892.54 

Sr. Dispatcher 

7/01/06 631.97 651.03 670.08 690.32 711.15 732.59 754.60 778.42 

biweekly 1,263.95 1,302.05 1,340.16 1,380.64 1,422.29 1,465.17 1,509.20 1,556.83 

Dispatcher Min Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 Step 5 Step 6 Step 7 Max 

7/01/06 568.93 586.18 603.43 621.88 640.33 652.98 679.30 701.62 

biweekly 1,137.85 1,172.35 1,206.85 1,243.77 1,280.67 1,305.96 1,358.60 1,403.24 

Specialist Range 

7/1/06 504.63 to 2,885.61 Annual Stipend 



168 



PUBLIC SAFETY POSITIONS 



Firefighter/EMT (hired prior to 

7/1/05) 

Call Firefighter/EMT (hired prior to 

7/1/05) 

* Based on a 42-hour workweek 

Firefighter/EMT (hired after 7/1/05) 
Call Firefighter/EMT (hired after 
7/1/05) 

* Based on a 42-hour workweek 



Step 1 Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 Step 5 

Step 6 Step 7 Step 8 Step 9 

19.81 20.41 21.01 21.64 22.29 

22.97 23.65 24.36 

17.28 17.80 18.33 18.88 19.45 

20.03 20.63 21.25 21.89 



Animal Control Officer/Inspector 


17.98 


18.50 


19.01 


19.56 


20.11 


* Based on a 40-hour workweek 


20.68 


21.27 


21.87 


22.48 




Assistant Animal Control Officer 


1,791.18 


1,957.25 


2,123.34 


2,288.30 


2,457.71 


* Annual Stipend 


2,623.79 


2,788.75 


2,987.15 


... 





MANAGERIAL POSITIONS 

Grade Level I 

Administrative Assistant to the 
Selectmen/Town Administrator 



Minimum Midpoint Maximum 

42,436 47,849 53,261 



Grade Level II 

No positions at this level 

Grade Level III 

Council on Aging Director 

Grade Level IV 

Parks & Recreation Director 



47,741 



53,045 



58,350 



53,045 



58,350 



63,654 



58,350 



63,654 



68,959 



Grade Level V 

Assistant Town Administrator 

Principal Assessor 

Town Accountant 



63,654 



71,611 



79,568 



169 



Treasurer/Collector 



Grade Level VI 
Library Director 



68,959 



76,915 



84,872 



Grade Level VII 84,872 100,786 

Fire Chief 

Police Chief* 

Superintendent of Public Works 

* Receives additional 20% of base salary as a result of Quinn Bill 

Educational Incentive 



116,699 



OTHER SALARIED 








POSITIONS 










Minimum 


Midpoint 


Maximum 


Grade Level I 








Outreach Social Worker 


42,436 


47,741 


53,045 


Conservation Agent (part-time) 


21,218 


23,870 


26,523 


Grade Level II 








Director of Youth Outreach 


46,350 


51,500 


56,650 



HOURLY PAID POSITIONS 



Grade 


MIN 


S2 


S3 


S4 


S5 


S6 


S7 


S8 


MAX 


10 


8.38 


8.63 


8.87 


9.12 


9.38 


9.64 


9.92 


10.20 


10.49 


20 


13.52 


13.90 


14.29 


14.69 


15.11 


15.54 


15.98 


16.43 


16.89 


30 


14.86 


15.29 


15.72 


16.16 


16.61 


17.09 


17.57 


18.07 


18.58 


40 


16.35 


16.81 


17.28 


17.78 


18.28 


18.80 


19.33 


19.88 


20.43 


50 


17.98 


18.50 


19.01 


19.56 


20.11 


20.68 


21.27 


21.87 


22.48 


60 


19.79 


20.34 


20.92 


21.50 


22.11 


22.75 


23.39 


24.05 


24.73 


70 


21.65 


22.30 


22.97 


23.65 


24.36 


25.09 


25.84 


26.63 


27.42 


80 


23.38 


24.08 


24.80 


25.55 


26.31 


27.10 


27.91 


28.75 


29.61 


90 


25.20 


25.95 


26.72 


27.53 


28.36 


29.21 


30.09 


30.98 


31.91 



170 



HOURLY GRADE LISTINGS 



Grade 10 


Grade 50 Grade 90 


Page 


Payroll Administrator Senior Foreman 




Administrative Assistant II 


Grade 20 


Circulation Supervisor 


Clerk Typist 


Equipment Operator 


Library Assistant 


Volunteer Coordinator 


Laborer 


Water Technician 


Mini-Bus Driver 




Police Matron 


Grade 60 


Special Police Officer 


Administrative Assistant III 




Children's Librarian 


Grade 30 


Park and Rec Program Coordinator 


Office Assistant 


Reference Librarian 


Sr. Library Assistant 




Truck Driver 


Grade 70 


Transportation Coordinator 


Sr. Equipment Operator 




Sr. Groundskeeper 


Grade 40 


Water Operator 


Administrative Assistant 


Tree Warden 


Elder Outreach Worker 




Groundskeeper 


Grade 80 


Maintenance Technician 


Foreman 



SPECIAL RATE/FEE POSITIONS- PART TIME/TEMPORARY 



Veterans Agent 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Registrar, Clerk 

Registrar 



Annually 

6,495 

2,212 

1,279 

164 



Police Intern 



380 to 515 



Police- Private Special Detail 



27.67 



171 



Tree Climber 
Library Page 



18.12 
8.87 to 11.64 



FIRE 

Deputy Chief 

Captain 

Lieutenant 

EMS Coordinator 

Fire Alarm Superintendent 



3,335 

2,001 

1,601 

694 

694 



INSPECTORS 



25.90 per inspection 



Inspector of Buildings 
Local Inspector of Buildings 
Gas Inspector 
Assistant Gas Inspector 
Plumbing Inspector 
Assistant Plumbing Inspector 
Wiring Inspector 
Assistant Wiring Inspector 
Zoning Enforcement Officer 
Street Inspector 

PARK AND RECREATION 

Program Director 

Swim Pond Director 

Swim Pond Assistant Director 

Swim Team Coach/Guard 

Assistant Coach/Guard 

Water Safety Instructor 

Lifeguard 

Swim Pond Badge Checker 

Swim Pond Maintenance 

Swim Pond Set-up Workers 

Camp Director 

Camp Specialists 

Counselors 

Jr. Counselor 



5,008 


672 


1,380 


253 


4,092 


939 


2,278 


672 


25.90 per inspection 


13.66 per inspection 


13, 187 to 15,720 


5,492 to 7,544 


3,664 to 5,031 


3,051 to 4,401 


1,954 to 3,396 


2,321 to 3,396 


2,208 to 3,144 


733 to 1,132 


855 to 1,132 


610 to 2,515 


2,442 to 4,813 


1,222 to 4,764 


977 to 2,515 


244 to 755 



172 



Tennis Director 3,664 to 5,03 1 

Tennis Instructor 733 to 1,259 

Trainee 7.34 

VOTED: That Article 9, the PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION PLAN and 
CLASSIFICATION OF POSITIONS AND PAY SCHEDULE be approved effective 
July 1, 2006 to read as set forth in the warrant. MOTION CARRIES (4/24/2006) 

Article 15. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/or transfer from 
available funds sums of money requested by the Selectmen or any other Town Officer, 
Board, Commission or Committee to defray operating expenses of the Town for the 
fiscal year commencing July 1, 2006, or such other sums as the Town may determine 
as required by General Laws, Chapter 41, Section 108, or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTED: That the Town appropriate the sum of $2,346,180 to the Town Debt 
Interest 01-751-2 budget, said sum to be raised on the FY07 tax levy. MOTION 
CARRIES (4/24/2006) 

VOTED: That the Town appropriate the sum of $44,303,531 to defray the operating 
expenses of the various Town Boards, Committees, Commissions and Departments as 
printed in the Warrant Report and/or as amended by this Town Meeting for the fiscal 
year commencing July 1 , 2006 and that to meet said appropriation the following sums 
be raised and appropriated on the fiscal 2007 tax levy or transferred from accounts or 
funds as follows: 

$41,418,371 -TAX LEVY 

20,048 - BOND PREMIUMS 

121,482 - BOND ANTICIPATION NOTE PREMIUMS 
36,000 - CEMETERY PERPETUAL CARE INTEREST ACCOUNT 
300,000 - STABILIZATION FUND FOR ADVANCE PAYMENTS OF SEWER 
BETTERMENTS 
1,202,424 - WATER ENTERPRISE FUND 
1,205,206 - SEWER ENTERPRISE FUND 

MOTION PASSED BY 2/3 VOTE (4/24/2006) 



173 



Article 16. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate from the Fiscal 2007 
Tax Levy and/or transfer from available funds and/or borrow for Capital Expenditures 
including the following: 



DEPARTMENT 
Board of Selectmen 

Conservation Commission 
Town Accountant 



Fire Department 



PROJECT 

Web Based GIS 
Aerial Flyover for GIS 

Future Land Acquisition 

Actuarial Study of Retiree Health Insurance Funding 
Financial Server Upgrade 

Fire Alarm System at Police and Fire Station 



Warrant Article 1 500 GPM Pumper Truck 



School Department 

Wheelock 



Vertical Lift Installation 
Staff Toilet HP Conversion 



Dale Street 



Police Department 



Public Works 



Warrant Article 



Park and Recreation 



Replace Exterior Windows 

One (1) Cruiser 
Reconstruction Holding Cells 

3/4 Ton Pickup 

Street Sweeper 

Backhoe 

Skid Steer Loader 

Resurface Subdivisions 

Design and Bid Specs for Public Works Garage 

Two (2) Dump Truck Bodies 

One (1) Ton Dump Truck 

1 5 Passenger Van 



And that the Board of Selectmen and/or the Treasurer/Collector and/or the Board of 
Assessors and/or the Parks and Recreation Commissioners and/or the Fire Department 
and/or the School Committee and/or the Police Department and/or the Public Works 
Department and/or the Water & Sewerage Commission be further authorized to 
contract with and otherwise deal with any federal and state agencies for 
reimbursement of the cost of any capital expenditure; and to trade and/or sell toward 
part of the purchase price the following : 



DEPARTMENT 



TRADE-IN OR SELL 



174 



Police Department One Cruiser Trade-In 

Public Works 1996 Elgin Sweeper Trade-In 



Or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Capital Budget Committee) 



FY07 CAPITAL BUDGET RECOMMENDATIONS 

DEPARTMENT PROJECT REQUEST RECOMMEND 

Board of 

Selectmen Web Based GIS $25,000 $25,000 

Aerial Flyover for GIS $20,000 $ 1 0,000 

Conservation 

Commission Future Land Acquisition $5,000 $5,000 

Actuarial Study of Retiree Health 



Town Accountant 


Insurance Funding 
Financial Server Upgrade 


$20,000 
$11,500 


$20,000 
$11,500 


Fire Department 

Warrant Article 


Fire Alarm System at Police and 

Fire Station 

1500 GPM Pumper Truck 


$6,500 
$375,000 


$6,500 


School 
Department 

Wheelock 


Vertical Lift Installation 
Staff Toilet HP Conversion 


$100,000 
$14,000 


$100,000 
$14,000 


Dale Street 


Replace Exterior Windows 


$78,000 


$39,000 


Police Department 


One (1) Cruiser 
Reconstruction Holding Cells 


$25,000 
$25,000 


$25,000 
$0 


Public Works 


3/4 Ton Pickup- Water Dept 


$19,000 


$19,000 


Warrant Article 


Street Sweeper 

Backhoe 

Skid Steer Loader 

Resurface Subdivisions 

Design and Bid Specs for Public 

Works Garage 

Two (2) Dump Truck Bodies 


$126,000 
$73,648 
$29,000 
$30,000 

$100,000 
$17,000 


$126,000 

$73,648 

$0 

$30,000 

$8,500 



175 



One (1) Ton Dump Truck 



$50,000 



$0 



Park and 
Recreation 



1 5 Passenger Van 



To be funded by: Tax Levy 

Unexpended Appropriation Funds 

reserve in Fd 60 Water Enterprise Fund 

DPW 1996 Elgin Sweeper Trade-in 
Police Cruiser Trade In 
Highway Garage Roof Repl 
01-422-9-590045 artl l/atm05 
3 1 -004-2-520000 Park & Rec Revolving 

Fire Station Roof Replacement 
01-220-9-590013 artl5/atm04 

Fire Dept. Exhaust System 



$25,000 


$25,000 


$1,174,648 


$538,148 


$252,913 




$19,000 

$20,000 

$200 




$6,250 
$25,000 





$5,350 



utll/atm05 


$3,435 


Total Additional Funds 


$79,235 


Borrowing 

Wheelock School Vertical Lift 




Installation 


$100,000 


DPW Street Sweeper $126k less 




trade-in 


$106,000 


Total Borrowing Authorization 


$206,000 



Total Capital Budget 



$538.148 



VOTED: That the Town raise and appropriate the sum of $538,148 for capital 
expenditures as recommended in the Warrant Report and/or as amended by this Town 
Meeting and that to meet this appropriation the following sums be raised on the Fiscal 
2007 tax levy and/or transferred from available funds and/or borrowed: And that the 
Treasurer/Collector, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen,is authorized to 
borrow under the provisions of Chapter 44, Section 7, paragraph ( 9) as amended, to 
fund the purchase of the Vertical Lift and the Street Sweeper; and that the Board of 
Selectmen and/or the Treasurer/Collector and/or the Board of Assessors and/or the 
Park and Recreation Commission and/or the Fire Department and/or the School 
Committee and/or the Police Department and/or the Public Works Department and/or 
the Water & Sewerage Board is further authorized to contract with and otherwise deal 
with any federal and state agencies for reimbursement of the cost of any capital 
expenditure; and to trade and/or sell toward part of the purchase price the following: 



176 



DEPARTMENT TRADE-IN OR SELL 



Police Department 


One Cruiser Trade-In 


Public Works 


1996 Elgin Sweeper Trade-In 







To be funded by: Tax Levy $252,913 

Unexpended Appropriation Funds 

reserve in Fd 60 Water Enterprise Fund $ 1 9,000 

DPW 1 996 Elgin Sweeper Trade-in $20,000 

Police Cruiser Trade In $200 

01-422-9-590045 Highway Garage Roof Repl artl l/atm05 $6,250 

3 1-004-2-520000 Park & Rec Revolving $25,000 

01-220-9-590013 Fire Station Roof Replacement artl5/atm04 $5,350 

1 -220-9-5900 1 7 Fire Dept. Exhaust System art 1 1 /atm05 $3,435 

Total Additional Funds $79,235 

Borrowing 

Wheelock School Vertical Lift Installation $ 1 00,000 

DPW Street Sweeper $ 1 26k less trade-in $106,000 

Total Borrowing Authorization $206,000 

Total Capital Budget $538.148 

MOTION PASSED BY 2/3 VOTE (4/24/2006) 

Article 17. To see if the Town will vote to authorize transfer of care, custody, 
management and control of a parcel of Town-owned land described as Lot 2 in the 
subdivision of Town-owned land off West Mill Street, shown on a plan dated March 
9, 2005, last revised August 18, 2005, to the Council on Aging to construct and 
operate an Adult Community Center, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Council on Aging) 

VOTED: That the Town authorize transfer of care, custody, management and control 
of a parcel of Town-owned land described as Lot 2 in the subdivision of Town-owned 
land off West Mill Street, shown on a plan dated March 9, 2005, last revised August 



177 



18, 2005, to the Council on Aging to construct and operate an Adult Community 
Center. MOTION CARRIES (4/24/2006) 

Article 18. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and determine 
in what manner said sum shall be raised, said funds to be used with funds appropriated 
under Article 21. of the 2004 ATM, for the purpose of designing, constructing, 
furnishing and equipping an Adult Community Center; to authorize the 
Treasurer/Collector, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to borrow in 
accordance with the provisions of Clause (3), Paragraph 7, Chapter 44 of the 
Massachusetts General Laws; and to authorize the Council on Aging with the approval 
of the Board of Selectmen to apply for grants from the federal and/or state 
governments and/or private parties and to enter into contracts to accomplish said 
purposes; provided that all appropriations authorized under this article be contingent 
upon approval of a so-called Proposition 2 Vi debt exclusion, in accordance with 
Chapter 59, Section 21C of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Adult Community Center Building Committee & Council on Aging) 

VOTED: That the Town appropriate $800,000, said sum to be raised by borrowing; 
said funds to be used with funds appropriated under Article 2 1 . of the 2004 ATM, for 
the purpose of designing, constructing, furnishing and equipping an Adult Community 
Center; and authorize the Treasurer/Collector, with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen, to borrow in accordance with the provisions of Clause (3), Paragraph 7, 
Chapter 44 of the Massachusetts General Laws; and authorize the Council on Aging 
and/or the Adult Community Center Study Committee with the approval of the Board 
of Selectmen to apply for grants from the federal and/or state governments and/or 
private parties and to enter into contracts to accomplish said purposes; provided that 
all appropriations authorized under this article be contingent upon approval of a so- 
called Proposition 2 Vi debt exclusion, in accordance with chapter 59, Section 21C of 
the General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. MOTION PASSES BY 
2/3 VOTE (4/24/2006) 

Article 19. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of $375,000 and 
determine in what manner said sum will be raised for the purpose of purchasing and 
equipping a new 1500 gallons per minute (GPM) pumper for the Fire Department, and 
to authorize the Board of Selectmen to trade a 1977 MACK pumper truck for part of 
the purchase price, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Fire Chief) 

VOTED: That the Town appropriate the sum of $375,000, said sum be raised by 
borrowing, for the purpose of purchasing and equipping a new 1500 gallons per 
minute (GPM) pumper for the Fire Department, and authorize the Treasurer/Collector, 
with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to borrow in accordance with the 
provisions of Chapter 44, Paragraph 7, Clause (9), as amended, of the Massachusetts 

178 



General Laws; and authorize the Fire Chief with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen, to apply for grants from the federal and/or state governments and/or 
private parties and to enter into contracts to accomplish said purposes and to authorize 
the Fire Department to trade a 1977 MACK pumper truck for part of the purchase 
price. MOTION CARRIES BY 2/3 VOTE (4/24/2006) 

Article 20. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and determine 
in what manner said sum shall be raised for the purpose of conducting site studies, 
designing, preparing preliminary plans and/or construction plans and bid documents 
for a new Public Works garage and facility, or do or take any other action in relation 
thereto. 

(Superintendent of Public Works) 

VOTED: That the Town appropriate $100,000, for the purpose of conducting site 
studies, designing, preparing preliminary plans and/or construction plans and bid 
documents for a new Public Works Garage and facility, said sum to be raised by 
borrowing, in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 44, Section 7, paragraph (21) 
as amended, and/or paragraph (22) as amended; and authorize the Superintendent of 
Public works, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to apply for grants from 
the federal and/or state governments and/or private parties and to enter into contracts 
to accomplish said purposes. MOTION CARRIES BY 2/3 VOTE (4/26/2006) 

Article 21. To see if the Town will vote to amend the bylaws of the Town of 
Medfield, Article VII. Dog Control by adding a new Section 1. Dog License and 
renumbering subsequent sections. New Section 1 to read as follows: 

"All dogs must be licensed each year before April 1 st . After that date, a $25.00 late 
fee will be charged in addition to the license fee. The fine for owning or keeping an 
unlicensed dog is an additional $25.00, after July 1 st of each calendar year. Failure to 
pay the above fine(s) within 21 days, may result in the issuance of a non-criminal 
complaint. 

Failure to receive a notice or reminder to license a dog does not relieve one of his/her 
obligation to pay the license fee or applicable penalties after April 1 st ." 



And by striking in existing Section 3 Penalty: 

And by adding the Town Clerk as an enforcing officer for ARTICLE VII. DOG 
CONTROL, SECTION 3 Penalty, as set out in ARTICLE XVII. BYLAW 
ENFORCEMENT, SECTION B. 

Or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Town Clerk) 

179 



VOTED: TO DISMISS THIS ARTICLE - MOTION CARRIES (Consent 
Calendar 4/24/2006) 

Article 22. To see if the Town will accept Sections 3 to 7, inclusive of Chapter 44B 
of the Massachusetts General Laws, otherwise known as the Massachusetts 
Community Preservation Act, by approving a surcharge on real property for the 
purposes permitted by said Act, including the acquisition, creation and preservation of 
open space, historic resources, land for recreational use and community housing that is 
acquired or created as provided under said Act; to determine the amount of such 
surcharge on real property as a percentage of the annual real estate tax levy against 
real property; to determine whether the Town will accept any of the exemptions from 
such surcharge permitted under Section 3(e) of said Act; or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. 

(Community Preservation Act Study Committee) 

MOTION FAILS (4/24/2006) 

Article 23 . To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way the following 
named street: 

Eastmount Road Station 1 1 .29.60 to Station 1 8+24.68 

As laid out by the Board of Selectmen and as shown on plans referred to in the Order 
of Layout on file with the Town Clerk's office and to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to acquire by eminent domain or otherwise, such rights, titles and 
easements, including drainage easements, as may be necessary to accomplish such 
purposes, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

It was so VOTED (Consent Calendar 4/24/2006) 

Article 24. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to enter 
into a ground lease with private developers for the whole parcel or any portion thereof 
of town-owned land off North Meadows Road, identified on the Board of Assessor's 
maps as map 56, lot 36, title reference: Norfolk Registry of Deed, Book 8540, Page 
727 for a period not to exceed 30 years for the purpose of providing a site for a private 
commercial solid waste processing and recycling facility on such terms and conditions 
as the Board of Selectmen deem to be in the best interest of the Town of Medfield. 
And, if deemed necessary or desirable, to authorize the Board of Selectmen to petition 
the General Court of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to enact special legislation 
authorizing the Town of Medfield to enter into such a lease, or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. 

(Solid Waste Committee) 
180 



VOTED: That the Town authorize the Solid Waste Committee to continue to study 
the possible lease of all or a portion of a parcel of Town-owned land adjacent to the 
Town's transfer station for the development and operation of a solid waste rail haul 
transfer station and/or recycling facility and report back to a future Town Meeting 
with its recommendations. MOTION CARRIES YES-350 NO-344, 
REQUESTED RECOUNT - MOTION FAILS YES-350 NO-356 PAPER 
BALLOT - MOTION CARRIES YES-403 NO-370 (4/24/2006) 

Article 25. To see if the Town will transfer a sum of money from sewer betterments 
paid in advance to the Sewer Stabilization Fund, established under Article 3 1 of the 
2004 ATM in accordance with the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 
40, Section 5B and Chapter 59, Section 21C, paragraph (g), as amended by Chapter 
137 of the Acts of 2003, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Water and Sewer Commissioners) 

VOTED: That the Town transfer $434,433 from sewer betterments paid in advance 
to the Sewer Stabilization Fund, established under Article 3 1 of the 2004 ATM in 
accordance with the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 
5B and Chapter 59, Section 21C, paragraph (g), as amended by Chapter 137 of the 
Acts of 2003, said funds to be used for the payment of debt and interest costs on sewer 
extension projects. MOTION PASSES BY 2/3 VOTE (4/24/2006) 

Article 26. To see if the Town will vote to establish a Stabilization Fund for the 
purpose of setting aside monies to cover the unfunded retiree health insurance costs in 
accordance with the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40C Section 
5B and Chapter 59, Section 21C, paragraph (g), as amended by Chapter 137 of the 
Acts of 2003, and to transfer a sum of money from the fy06 County Retirement 
Contribution budget, 01-911-2 to said Stabilization Fund, or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. 

(Town Administrator) 

VOTED: That the Town establish a Stabilization Fund for the purpose of setting 
aside monies to cover the unfunded retiree health insurance costs in accordance with 
the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40C, Section 5B and Chapter 
59, Section 21C, paragraph (g) as amended by Chapter 137 of the Acts of 2003, and 
appropriate the sum of $17,831 for this purpose, said sum to be raised by transferring 
$17,831 from the fy-06 County Retirement Contribution budget, 01-91 1-2. MOTION 
CARRIES BY 2/3 VOTE (4/24/2006) 

Article 27. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of $220.49 in 
accordance with the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 44, Section 64 
for the purpose of paying a prior year bill to DSCI for telephone services for the Town 
Hall, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

181 



(Town Administrator) 

VOTED: That the Town appropriate the sum of $220.49 in accordance with the 
provisions of Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 44, Section 64 for the purpose of 
paying a prior year bill to DSCI for telephone services for the Town Hall. MOTION 
CARRIES BY 4/5 VOTE (4/24/2006) 



Article 28. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the sum of $40,000. from the 
Fund Balance Reserved for Abatement/Exemptions Surplus, Account 01 315500 to 
the Court Settlement Account 019412 576500, for the purpose of funding a settlement 
agreement filed with the United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Town Administrator) 

VOTED: That the Town transfer the sum of $40,000. from the Fund Balance 
Reserved for Abatement/Exemptions Surplus, Account 01 315500 to the Court 
Settlement Account 019412 576500, for the purpose of funding a settlement 
agreement filed with the United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. 
MOTION CARRIES (4/24/2006) 

Article 29. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and determine 
in what manner said sum shall be raised for the purpose of funding the Town's share 
of a grant to conduct a hazard mitigation study, or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. 

(Town Administrator) 

VOTED: That the Town appropriate $3,000, said sum to be raised on the fy07 tax 
levy, for the purpose of funding the Town's share of a grant to conduct a hazard 
mitigation study. MOTION CARRIES (4/24/2006) 

Article 30. To see if the Town will vote to rescind the outstanding bond 
authorization voted under Article 23 of the April 30, 2001 Annual Town Meeting, 
which appropriated funds to repair the Medfield State Hospital Well, or do or act 
anything in relation thereto. 

(Treasurer/Collector) 

VOTED: That the Town rescind the $900,000 outstanding bond authorization voted 
under Article 23 of the April 30, 2001 Annual Town Meeting, which appropriated 
funds to repaid the Medfield State Hospital Well. MOTION CARRIES 
4/24/2006) 



182 



Article 31. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the sum of $710,000 from 
available funds appropriated under the provisions of Article 1 of the November 8, 
1999 Special Town Meeting (for construction of sewers in the Phase 1C Indian Hill 
section in Medfield) to Article 34 of the 2005 April Town Meeting to provide the 
funding to design and construct sewers in the Hatters Hill section of Medfield, and to 
rescind the outstanding bond authorization voted under Article 34 of the April 25, 
2005 Annual Town Meeting, which appropriated funds to design and construct sewers 
on Hatters Hill section of Medfield or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Water & Sewer Commissioners and Treasurer/Collector) 

VOTED: That the Town transfer the sum of $710,000 from available funds 
appropriated under the provisions of Article 1 of the November 8, 1999 Special Town 
Meeting (for construction of sewers in the Phase 1C Indian Hill section in Medfield) 
to Article 34 of the 2005 April Town Meeting to provide the funding to design and 
construct sewers in the Hatters Hill section of Medfield, and rescind the outstanding 
$710,000 bond authorization voted under Article 34 of the April 25, 2005 Annual 
Town Meeting, which appropriated funds to design and construct sewers on Hatters 
Hill section of Medfield. MOTION CARRIES (4/24/2006) 

Article 32. To see if the Town will appropriate a sum of money and determine in 
what manner said sum shall be raised for the purpose of site evaluation, preliminary 
design, construction cost estimates and operating cost estimates for a Town-owned 
Community Center, Field House and Driving Range to be constructed on Town- 
owned land, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Park and Recreation Commissioners) 

MOTION FAILS (4/24/2006) 

Article 33. To see if the Town will vote to authorize transfer of care, custody, 
management and control, of a parcel of Town-owned land described as Lot 3 in the 
subdivision of Town-owned land off West Mill Street, shown on a plan dated March 
9, 2005, last revised August 18, 2005, to the Medfield Parks and Recreation 
Commissioners to be used for the development of an athletic field(s), or do or act 
anything in relation thereto. 

(Parks and Recreation Commissioners) 

MOTION FAILS (4/24/2006) 

Article 34. To see if the Town will vote to take any action on the recommendations of 
the Parks and Recreation Department's advisory committee, appointed pursuant to the 
2005 Annual Town Meeting vote on Article 32 and/or take any action pursuant to the 
2005 Annual Town Meeting vote on Article 33, authorizing the Board of Selectmen to 
lease property off West Mill Street for the purpose of providing a site for a privately 
operated sports and recreation center, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

183 



(Citizen Petition) 

MOTION FAILS (4/24/2006) 

Article 35. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and determine 
in what manner said sum shall be raised for the purpose of constructing a sidewalk on 
North Street from Winter Street to the Dover line, or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. 

(Citizen Petition) 

MOTION FAILS (4/24/2006) 

Article 36. To see if the Town will authorize the Board of Assessors to use a sum of 
money from free cash in the Treasury for the reduction of the tax rate for fiscal 2007, 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Assessors) 

VOTED: That the Town authorize the Board of Assessors to use $1,000,000 from 
free cash in the Treasury for the reduction of the tax rate for fiscal 2007. MOTION 
CARRIES (4/24/2006) 



And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an attested copy thereof, in the 
usual place for posting warrants in said Medfield, seven days at least before the time 
of holding said Election. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant with your doings thereon, unto the 
Town Clerk at the time and place of the Town Meeting aforesaid. Given unto our 
hands this 14 th day of April, Two-Thousand and Six. 

Osier Peterson S\ 

Ann Thompson S\ 

Paul Rhuda S\ 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



184 



By virtue of this warrant, I have notified and warned the Inhabitants of the Town of 
Medfield, qualified to vote in elections, to meet at the time and for the purposes 
named, by posting attested copies of the same at five public places seven days before 
the date of the elections as within directed. 

Constable: Eric Bazigian 
Date: April 14, 2006 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 



Carol A Mayer S\ CMC, CMMC 
Town Clerk 



185 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

SPECIAL TOWN ELECTION 

JUNE 5, 2006 

Norfolk,ss. 

To the Constables of the Town of Medfield in said County, Greetings: 

In the Name of the Commonwealth, you are directed to notify and warn the 
Inhabitants of the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in Town elections by ballot at 
the Ralph Wheelock School gymnasium, located on Elm Street in said Medfield, on 
MONDAY the 5th day of JUNE, A.D., 2006, at 6:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. for the 
following questions: 

PROPOSITION 2 1/2 DEBT EXCLUSION QUESTION 

Shall the Town of Medfield be allowed to exempt from the provision of proposition 
two and one-half, so called, the amounts required to pay for the additional bonds 
issued in order to pay for the design, construction, furnishing and equipping of a Adult 
Community Center? 

YES NO 



PROPOSITION 2 Vi OPERATIONAL OVERRIDE QUESTION 

Shall the Town of Medfield be allowed to assess an additional $1,000,000 in real 
estate and personal property taxes for the general operating expenses of the various 
Town and School Departments for the fiscal year beginning July first, two thousand 
and six? 

YES NO 



And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an attested copy thereof, in the 
usual place for posting warrants in said Medfield, seven days at least before the time 
of holding said Election. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant with your doings thereon, unto the 
Town Clerk at the time and place of the Town Meeting aforesaid. Given unto our 
hands this 2nd day of May, Two-Thousand and Six. 



186 



Ann Thompson S\ 
Paul Rhuda S\ 
Osier Peterson S\ 
BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

By virtue of this warrant, I have notified and warned the Inhabitants of the Town of 
Medfield, qualified to vote in elections, to meet at the time and for the purposes 
named, by posting attested copies of the same at five public places seven days before 
the date of the elections as within directed. 

Constable: Richard M Kelleher S\ 
Date: May 3, 2006 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 
Carol A. Mayer S\, CMC, CMMC 
Town Clerk 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

SPECIAL TOWN ELECTION 

JUNE 5, 2006 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, the polls were opened at 6:00 A.M. with reading of 
the warrant and the swearing in of the election workers present. The ballot boxes were 
inspected and found to be in working order, specimen ballots posted, voting list was 
displayed and instruction to the voters posted. 

WARDEN: G. Marshall Chick 
ASSISTANT WARDEN: Al Allegretto 

TELLERS: Michael Costa, Ruth Chick, John Hand, Emmy Mitchell, Missy 
Cavanaugh, Tom Scecina, Kathy Lee, Rita Allegretto, Barbara Reynolds, Jane 
Timmerman Sandy Williams, Herbert Williams, Eugene Swezey, Pat Shapiro and 
Virginia Whyte 

The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 

The total vote was 2053. There are 7,854 registered voters, 26% of voters voting. 



187 





PRECINCT 




1 

322 


2 

352" 


3 

403 


4 

363 


TOTAL 

1440 


123 


135 


170 


161 


589 


9 


3 


7 


5 


24 
2053 


281 


302 


380 


313 


1276 


172 


186 


199 


213 


770 


1 


2 


1 


3 


7 



QUESTION 1 - PROP 2 Y 2 DEBT EXCLUSION 

ADULT COMMUNITY CENTER 
Yes 

No 
Blanks 

QUESTION 2 - PROP 2 V 2 OPERATIONAL 

OVERRIDE 
Yes 
No 
Blanks 

2053 
After the results were announced, the checked ballots, voting lists and tally sheets 
were turned over to the Town Clerk for safekeeping as prescribed by law. 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 



Carol A. Mayer, CMC/CMMC S\ 
TOWN CLERK 

June 6, 2006 



188 



WILLIAM FRANCIS GALVIN 

SECRETARY OF THE COMMONWEALTH 

SEPTEMBER 19, 2006 

SS. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield, 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, you are hereby required to notify and warn the 
inhabitants of said town who are qualified to vote in Primaries to vote at the Ralph 
Wheelock School in said Medfield on TUESDAY, THE NINETEENTH DAY OF 
SEPTEMBER, 2006 from 6:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. for the following purpose: 

To cast their votes in the State Primary for the candidates of political parties for the 
following offices: 

SENATOR IN CONGRESS FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

GOVERNOR FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

LT. GOVERNOR FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

ATTORNEY GENERAL FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

SECRETARY OF STATE FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

TREASURER FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

AUDITOR FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 9th Congressional District 

COUNCILLOR 2 nd Councillor District 

SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT Norfolk & Bristol District 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 13 th Norfolk District -P 1 &2 

9 th Norfolk District - P 3 & 4 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY Norfolk District 

CLERK OF COURTS Norfolk County 

REGISTER OF DEEDS Norfolk County 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER Norfolk County 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an attested copy thereof, in the 
usual place for posting warrants in said Medfield seven days at least before the time of 
holding said Town Election. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant with your doings thereon, unto the 
Town Clerk at the time and place of the State Primary Election aforesaid. Given unto 
our hands this 29th day of August, 2006 

Ann B. Thompson s/ 
Paul Rhuda s/ 



189 



Osier Peterson s/ 
BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



By virtue of this warrant, I have notified and warned the inhabitants of the Town of 
Medfield, qualified to vote in elections, to meet at the time and for the purpose named, 
by posting attested copies of said warrant in not less than five public places in the 
Town of Medfield at least seven days before the time of holding the meeting. 

Constable: Richard Kelleher 
Date: August 30, 2006 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 
Carol A Mayer s/, CMC, CMMC 
Town Clerk 



190 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

STATE PRIMARY 

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2006 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, the polls were opened at 6:00 AM with reading of 
the warrant and the swearing in of the election workers present. The ballot boxes were 
inspected and found to be in working order, specimen ballots posted, voting list was 
displayed and instruction to the voters were posted. 

WARDEN: G. Marshall Chick 
ASSISTANT WARDEN: Al Alegretto 

TELLERS: Kathy Lee, Rita Alegretto, John Hand, Al Alegretto, Ruth Chick, Pat 
Shapiro, Mike Costa, Herb Williams, Barbara Reynolds, Sandy Williams, Emmy 
Mitchell, Missy Cavanaugh, Gene Sweezy, John McGowan, Jane Timmerman and 
Virginia Whyte 

The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 

The total vote was 2,008. Total registered voters numbered 7,936, 25% of the voters 
voting. After the counting and tabulation of the ballots, the results were as follows: 



DEMOCRATIC BALLOTS 






PRECINCT 




SENATOR IN CONGRESS vote for 


1 


2 


3 


4 


TOTAL 


ONE 












Edward M Kennedy 


341 


377 


370 


325 


1413 


Scattered 


2 


6 


5 


3 


16 


Blanks 


121 


100 


97 


90 


408 
1837 


GOVERNOR vote for ONE 












Christopher F Gabrieli 


192 


140 


161 


144 


637 


Deval L Patrick 


211 


256 


245 


213 


925 


Thomas F Reilly 


59 


85 


63 


58 


265 


Scattered 






1 




1 


Blanks 


2 


2 


2 


3 


9 
1837 


LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR vote 












for ONE 












Deborah B Goldberg 


142 


130 


141 


104 


517 


Timothy P Murray 


191 


170 


165 


176 


702 


Andrea C Silbert 


84 


135 


113 


93 


425 


Scattered 


1 




1 




2 


Blanks 


46 


48 


52 


45 


191 



191 



1837 



ATTORNEY GENERAL vote for 
ONE 

Martha Coakley 

Scattered 

Blanks 



SECRETARY OF STATE vote for 

ONE 

William Francis Galvin 

John Bonifaz 

Scattered 

Blanks 



TREASURER vote for ONE 
Timothy P. Cahill 
Scattered 
Blanks 



AUDITOR vote for ONE 
A. Joseph DeNucci 
Scattered 
Blanks 



REPRESENTATIVE IN 
CONGRESS vote for ONE 
Stephen F. Lynch 
Philip Dunkelbarger 
Scattered 
Blanks 



COUNCILLOR vote for ONE 
Kelly A. Timilty 
Scattered 
Blanks 



350 


376 


366 


313 


1405 




1 


1 


1 


3 


114 


106 


105 


104 


429 
1837 


326 


339 


353 


308 


1326 


65 


55 


49 
1 


50 


219 

1 


73 


89 


69 


60 


291 
1837 


340 


371 


350 


305 


1366 


124 


112 


122 


113 


471 



327 


345 

2 


342 


291 


1305 

2 


137 


136 


130 


127 


530 
1837 


287 


305 


295 


249 


1136 


127 


119 


127 
6 


120 


493 
6 


50 


59 


44 


49 


202 
1837 


296 


342 


310 


267 


1215 




1 






1 


168 


140 


162 


151 


621 
1837 



192 



SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 












vote for ONE 












James E Timilty 


311 


349 


328 


287 


1275 


Scattered 




2 






2 


Blanks 


153 


132 


144 


131 


560 
1837 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL 
COURT vote for ONE 

Lida E. Harkins 342 358 700 

Scattered 3 3 

Blanks 122 122 244 

947 



DISTRICT ATTORNEY vote for 












ONE 












William R. Keating 


333 


353 


336 


293 


1315 


Scattered 












Blanks 


131 


130 


136 


125 


522 
1837 


CLERK OF COURTS vote for ONE 












Walter F Timilty, Jr 


301 


332 


307 


272 


1212 


Scattered 












Blanks 


163 


151 


165 


146 


625 
1837 



REGISTER OF DEEDS vote for 
ONE 

William P. O'Donnell 311 332 323 279 1245 

Scattered 

Blanks 153 151 149 139 592 

1837 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER vote 

for ONE 

Peter H. Collins 301 

Scattered 

Blanks 163 



REPUBLICAN BALLOTS 

SENATOR IN CONGRESS vote for 

ONE 

Kenneth G Chase 19 16 18 20 73 



326 


303 


264 


1194 


157 


169 


154 


643 
1837 



193 



Kevin P Scott 




13 


22 


27 


20 


82 


Scattered 














Blanks 




5 


6 


2 


3 


16 
171 


GOVERNOR vote for ONE 














Kerry Healey 




32 


40 


38 


38 


148 


Scattered 




1 


1 


2 




4 


Blanks 




4 


3 


7 


5 


19 
171 


LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR 


vote 












for ONE 














Reed V Hillman 




31 


35 


35 


39 


140 


Scattered 














Blanks 




6 


9 


12 


4 


31 
171 


ATTORNEY GENERAL vote 


for 












ONE 














Larry Frisoli 




31 


30 


37 


40 


138 


Scattered 














Blanks 




6 


14 


10 


3 


33 
171 


SECRETARY OF STATE vote for 












ONE 














Scattered 














Blanks 




37 


44 


47 


43 


171 
171 


TREASURER vote for ONE 














Scattered 






1 






1 


Blanks 




37 


43 


47 


43 


170 
171 


AUDITOR vote for ONE 














Scattered 














Blanks 




37 


44 


47 


43 


171 
171 


REPRESENTATIVE 


IN 












CONGRESS vote for ONE 














Jack E Robinson 




27 


29 


30 


34 


120 


Scattered 














Blanks 




10 


15 


17 


9 


51 



194 



8 


4 


28 
171 


8 


39 


77 


9 


4 


13 
90 



171 

COUNCILLOR vote for ONE 

Michael W McCue 29 30 33 35 127 

Scattered 

Blanks 8 14 14 8 44 

171 

SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 

vote for ONE 

Michael L Atwill 33 32 39 39 143 

Scattered 

Blanks 4 12 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GERAL 

COURT vote for ONE 

Richard J Ross 

Scattered 

Blanks 



DISTRICT ATTORNEY vote for 
ONE 
Scattered 

Blanks 37 44 47 43 171 

171 

CLERK OF COURTS vote for ONE 
Scattered 

Blanks 37 44 47 43 171 

171 

REGISTER OF DEEDS vote for 
ONE 
Scattered 

Blanks 37 44 47 43 171 

171 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER vote 
for ONE 

Thomas E Gorman 27 28 33 39 127 

Scattered 

Blanks 10 16 14 4 44 

171 



195 



The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. After the results were announced, the ballots 
checked, voting lists and tally sheets were turned over to the Town Clerk for 
safekeeping as prescribed by law. 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST 



Carol A. Mayer s\, CMC, CMMC 
TOWN CLERK 
September 21, 2006 



196 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

WILLIAM FRANCIS GALVIN 

SECRETARY OF THE COMMONWEALTH 

NOVEMBER 7, 2006 

SS. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield, 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, you are hereby required to notify and warn the 
inhabitants of said town who are qualified to vote in State Elections to vote at the 
Ralph Wheelock School in said Medfield on TUESDAY, THE SEVENTH DAY OF 
NOVEMBER, 2006 from 6:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. for the following purpose: 

To cast their votes in the State Election for the candidates for the following offices and 
questions: 

SENATOR IN CONGRESS FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

GOVERNOR/LT.GOVERNOR FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

ATTORNEY GENERAL FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

SECRETARY OF STATE FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

TREASURER FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

AUDITOR FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 9 th DISTRICT 

COUNCILLOR 2 ND DISTRICT 

SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT NORFOLK & BRISTOL 

DISTRICT 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 13™ DISTRICT 

9 th DISTRICT 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY NORFOLK DISTRICT 

CLERK OF COURTS NORFOLK COUNTY 

REGISTER OF DEEDS NORFOLK COUNTY 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER NORFOLK COUNTY 

QUESTION 1: Law Proposed by Initiative Petition 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, on which no vote was taken by the Senate or the 
House of Representatives before May 3, 2006? 

SUMMARY 

This proposed law would allow local licensing authorities to issue licenses for food stores 
to sell wine. The proposed law defines a "food store" as a retail vendor, such as a grocery 
store, supermarket, shop, club, outlet, or warehouse-type seller, that sells food to consumers to 
be eaten elsewhere (which must include meat, poultry, dairy products, eggs, fresh fruit and 
produce, and other specified items), and that may sell other items usually found in grocery 
stores. Holders of licenses to sell wine at food stores could sell wine either on its own or 



197 



together with any other items they sell. 

The licensing authorities in any city or town of up to 5000 residents could issue up to 5 
licenses for food stores to sell wine. In cities or towns of over 5000 residents, one additional 
license could be issued for each additional 5000 residents (or fraction of 5000). No person or 
business could hold more than 10% of the total number of the licenses that could be issued 
under the proposed law. Such licenses would not be counted when applying the laws that 
limit the number of other kinds of alcoholic beverage licenses that may be issued or held. Any 
applicant for a license would have to be approved by the state Alcoholic Beverages Control 
Commission, and any individual applicant would have to be at least 2 1 years old and not have 
been convicted of a felony. 

In issuing any licenses for food stores to sell wine, local licensing authorities would have 
to use the same procedures that apply to other licenses for the retail sale of alcoholic 
beverages. Except where the proposed law has different terms, the same laws that apply to 
issuance, renewal, suspension and termination of licenses for retail sales of alcoholic 
beverages which are not to be consumed on the seller's premises, and that apply to the 
operations of holders of such licenses, would govern licenses to sell wine at food stores, and 
the operation of holders of such licenses. Local authorities could set fees for issuing and 
renewing such licenses. 

A YES VOTE would create a new category of licenses for food stores to sell wine, and it 
would allow local licensing authorities to issue such licenses. 
A NO VOTE would make no change in the laws concerning the sale of wine. 
QUESTION 2: Law Proposed by Initiative Petition 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, on which no vote was taken by the Senate or the 
House of Representatives before May 3, 2006? 
SUMMARY 

This proposed law would allow candidates for public office to be nominated by more than 
one political party or political designation, to have their names appear on the ballot once for 
each nomination, and to have their votes counted separately for each nomination but then 
added together to determine the winner of the election. 

The proposed law would repeal an existing requirement that in order to appear on the state 
primary ballot as a candidate for a political party's nomination for certain offices, a person 
cannot have been enrolled in any other party during the preceding year. The requirement 
applies to candidates for nomination for statewide office, representative in Congress, 
governor's councillor, member of the state Legislature, district attorney, clerk of court, 
register of probate, register of deeds, county commissioner, sheriff, and county treasurer. The 
proposed law would also allow any person to appear on the primary ballot as a candidate for a 
party's nomination for those offices if the party's state committee gave its written consent. 
The proposed law would also repeal the existing requirement that in order to be nominated to 
appear as an unenrolled candidate on the state election ballot, or on any city or town ballot 
following a primary, a person cannot have been enrolled in any political party during the 90 
days before the deadline for filing nomination papers. 

The proposed law would provide that if a candidate were nominated by more than one 
party or political designation, instead of the candidate's name being printed on the ballot once, 
with the candidate allowed to choose the order in which the party or political designation 
names appear after the candidate's name, the candidate's name would appear multiple times, 
once for each nomination received. The candidate would decide the order in which the party 
or political designation nominations would appear, except that all parties would be listed 
before all political designations. The ballot would allow voters who vote for a candidate 
nominated by multiple parties or political designations to vote for that candidate under the 



198 



party or political designation line of their choice. 

If a voter voted for the same candidate for the same office on multiple party or political 
designation lines, the ballot would remain valid but would be counted as a single vote for the 
candidate on a line without a party or political designation. If voting technology allowed, 
voting machines would be required to prevent a voter from voting more than the number of 
times permitted for any one office. 

The proposed law would provide that if a candidate received votes under more than one 
party or political designation, the votes would be combined for purposes of determining 
whether the candidate had won the election. The total number of votes each candidate 
received under each party or political designation would be recorded. Election officials would 
announce and record both the aggregate totals and the total by party or political designation. 

The proposed law would allow a political party to obtain official recognition if its 
candidate had obtained at least 3% of the vote for any statewide office at either of the two 
most recent state elections, instead of at only the most recent state election as under current 
law. 

The proposed law would allow a person nominated as a candidate for any state, city or 
town office to withdraw his name from nomination within six days after any party's primary 
election for that office, whether or not the person sought nomination or was nominated in that 
primary. Any candidate who withdrew from an election could not be listed on the ballot for 
that election, regardless of whether the candidate received multiple nominations. 

The proposed law states that if any of its parts were declared invalid, the other parts 
would stay in effect. 

A YES VOTE would allow a candidate for public office to be nominated for the same office 
by more than one political party or political designation at the same election. 
A NO VOTE would make no change in the laws concerning nomination of candidates for 
public office. 

QUESTION 3: Law Proposed by Initiative Petition 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, on which no vote was taken by the Senate or the 

House of Representatives before May 3, 2006? 

SUMMARY 

This proposed law would allow licensed and other authorized providers of child care in 
private homes under the state's subsidized child care system to bargain collectively with the 
relevant state agencies about all terms and conditions of the provision of child care services 
under the state's child care assistance program and its regulations. 

Under the proposed law, these family child care providers who provide state-subsidized 
child care would not be considered public employees, but if 30% of the providers gave written 
authorization for an employee organization to be their exclusive representative in collective 
bargaining, the state Labor Relations Commission would hold a secret mail ballot election on 
whether to certify that organization as the exclusive representative. Parts of the state's public 
employee labor relations law and regulations would apply to the election and collective 
bargaining processes. The proposed law would not authorize providers to engage in a strike or 
other refusal to deliver child care services. 

An exclusive representative, if certified, could then communicate with providers to 
develop and present a proposal to the state agencies concerning the terms and conditions of 
child care provider services. The proposed law would then require the parties to negotiate in 
good faith to try to reach a binding agreement. If the agreed-upon terms and conditions 
required changes in existing regulations, the state agencies could not finally agree to the terms 
until they completed the required procedures for changing regulations and any cost items 



199 



agreed to by the parties had been approved by the state Legislature. If any actions taken under 
the proposed law required spending state funds, that spending would be subject to 
appropriation by the Legislature. Any complaint that one of the parties was refusing to 
negotiate in good faith could be filed with and ruled upon by the Labor Relations 
Commission. An exclusive representative could collect a fee from providers for the costs of 
representing them. 

An exclusive representative could be de-certified under Commission regulations and 
procedures if certain conditions were met. The Commission could not accept a decertification 
petition for at least 2 years after the first exclusive representative was certified, and any such 
petition would have to be supported by 50% or more of the total number of providers. The 
Commission would then hold a secret mail ballot election for the providers to vote on whether 
to decertify the exclusive representative. 

The proposed law states that activities carried out under it would be exempt from federal 
anti-trust laws. The proposed law states that if any of its parts were declared invalid, the other 
parts would stay in effect. 

A YES VOTE would allow licensed and other authorized providers of child care in private 
homes under the state's subsidized child care system to bargain collectively with the state. 
A NO VOTE would make no change in the laws concerning licensed and other authorized 
family child care providers. 

QUESTION 4 -THIS QUESTION IS NOT BINDING 

Shall the state representative from this district be instructed to vote in favor of a resolution 
calling upon the President and Congress of the United States to end the war in Iraq 
immediately and bring all United States military forces home from Iraq? 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an attested copy thereof, in the 
usual place for posting warrants in said Medfield seven days at least before the time of 
holding said State Election. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant with your doings thereon, unto the 
Town Clerk at the time and place of the State Election aforesaid. Given unto our 
hands this 10th day of October, 2006 

Ann B. Thompson s/ 

Osier Peterson s/ 

Paul Rhuda s/ 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

By virtue of this warrant, I have notified and warned the inhabitants of the Town of 
Medfield, qualified to vote in elections, to meet at the time and for the purpose named, 
by posting attested copies of said warrant in not less than five public places in the 
Town of Medfield at least seven days before the time of holding the meeting. 

Constable: Raymond Burton 
Date: October 12, 2006 
A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 
Carol A Mayer s/, CMC, CMMC 



200 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

STATE ELECTION 

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2006 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, the polls were opened at 6:00 AM with reading of 
the warrant and the swearing in of the election workers present. The ballot boxes were 
inspected and found to be in working order, specimen ballots posted, voting list was 
displayed and instruction to the voters were posted. 

WARDEN: G. Marshall Chick 
ASSISTANT WARDEN: Al Allegreto 

TELLERS: Michael Costa, John McGowan, Ruth Chick, John Hand, Emmy Mitchell, 
Joanne Surette, Kathy Lee, Rita Allegretto, Barbara Reynolds, Jane Timmerman, 
Sandy Williams, Herb Williams, Gene Swezey, Pat Shapiro and Virginia Whyte 
The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 

The total vote was 5,641. Total registered voters numbered 8,037, 70% of the voters 
voting. After the counting and tabulation of the ballots, the results were as follows: 









PRECINCT 






1 


2 


3 


4 


TOTAL 


SENATOR IN CONGRESS vote for ONE 












Edward M. Kennedy 


853 


838 


874 


738 


3303 


Kenneth G. Chase 


489 


485 


574 


580 


2128 


Write In 




3 




2 


5 


Blanks 


40 


50 


69 


46 


205 
5641 


GOVERNOR AND LIEUTENANT 












GOVERNOR vote for ONE 












Healey and Hillman 


563 


593 


733 


673 


2562 


Patrick and Murray 


707 


653 


660 


579 


2599 


Mihos and Sullivan 


71 


69 


72 


84 


296 


Ross and Robinson 


25 


35 


34 


15 


109 


Write In 


3 


3 




2 


8 


Blanks 


13 


23 


18 


13 


67 
5641 


ATTORNEY GENERAL vote for ONE 












Martha Coakley 


923 


887 


948 


814 


3572 


Larry Frisoli 


396 


423 


505 


488 


1812 


Write In 




1 






1 


Blanks 


63 


65 


64 


64 


256 
5641 



201 



SECRETARY OF STATE vote for ONE 
William Francis Galvin 

Jill E Stein 
Write In 
Blanks 



TREASURER vote for ONE 
Timothy P Cahill 

James O'Keefe 
Write In 
Blanks 



AUDITOR vote for ONE 



007 


991 


110 
5 


959 


4062 


213 


201 


231 


208 


853 


1 


3 


12 


3 


19 


161 


181 


169 


196 


707 
5641 


042 


101 


114 


972 


4170 




1 


5 






155 


167 


167 


185 


674 


1 


2 






3 


184 


196 


205 


209 


794 
5641 



A Joseph DeNucci 


1008 


974 


108 

2 

197 


928 


3992 


Rand Wilson 


170 


185 


202 


754 


Write In 


1 


1 


3 




5 


Blanks 


203 


216 


235 


236 


890 
5641 


REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS vote for 












ONE 












Stephen F Lynch 


929 


917 


964 


844 


3654 


Jack E Robinson 


357 


368 


442 


427 


1594 


Write In 


1 


2 


1 


2 


6 


Blanks 


95 


89 


110 


93 


387 
5641 


COUNCILLOR vote for ONE 












Kelly A Timilty 


782 


739 


803 


653 


2977 


Michael W McCue 


449 


497 


554 


578 


2078 


Write In 












Blanks 


151 


140 


160 


135 


586 
5641 


SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT vote for 












ONE 












James E Timilty 


768 


737 


803 


665 


2973 


Michael L Atwill 


484 


519 


581 


582 


2166 



202 



Write In 

Blanks 130 120 133 119 502 

5641 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 

vote for ONE 

Lida E. Harkins (P 1 & 2) 

Richard Ross (P 3& 4) 

Write In 
Blanks 



DISTRICT ATTORNEY vote for ONE 
William R Keating 

Write In 
Blanks 



CLERK OF COURTS vote for ONE 
Walter F Timilty, Jr 

Write In 
Blanks 



REGISTER OF DEEDS vote for ONE 
William P O'Donnell 

Write In 
Blanks 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER vote for ONE 

Peter H Collins 

Thomas E Gorman 

Write In 

Blanks 



1038 


103 

5 






2073 






107 


967 


2037 













4 


6 


10 


6 


26 


340 


335 


437 


393 


1505 
5641 


1005 


103 
6 


107 
9 


962 


4082 


3 


3 


8 


1 


15 


374 


337 


430 


403 


1544 
5641 


959 


984 


102 
6 


898 


3867 


2 


4 


4 


2 


12 


421 


388 


487 


466 


1762 
5641 


976 


100 




103 

5 


916 


3927 


2 


3 


3 


1 


9 


404 


373 


479 


449 


1705 
5641 


639 


598 


690 


554 


2481 


477 


525 


601 


620 


2223 


266 


253 


226 


192 


937 
5641 



QUESTIONS 

#1 WINE IN FOOD STORES 

Yes 556 511 604 552 2223 

No 765 795 870 742 3172 



203 



Blanks 61 70 43 72 246 

5641 



#2 NOMINATION BY MORE THAN ONE 












POLITICAL PARTY 












Yes 


405 


433 


511 


422 


1771 


No 


863 


823 


881 


797 


3364 


Blanks 


114 


120 


125 


147 


506 
5641 


#3 CHILD CARE 












Yes 


512 


521 


597 


494 


2124 


No 


744 


721 


793 


720 


2978 


Blanks 


126 


134 


127 


152 


539 
5641 


#4 (P 1 & 2) RESOLUTION (NOT BINDING) 












Yes 


669 


603 






1272 


No 


569 


583 






1152 


Blanks 


144 


190 






334 



2758 
The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. After the results were announced, the ballots 
checked, voting lists and tally sheets were turned over to the Town Clerk for 
safekeeping as prescribed by law. 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST 



Carol A. Mayer, CMC, CMMC S\ 
TOWN CLERK 
November 9, 2006 



204 



FINANCIAL REPORTS 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING 

DECEMBER 31, 2006 



205 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 
COMPARATIVE FINANCIAL REPORTS 
2005, 2006 AND 2007 



2005 1 Residential 

2 Open Space 

3 Commercial 

4 Industrial 

5 Personal Property 


3929 

110 

109 

49 

195 


$2,024,015,900.00 

$4,514,200.00 

$51,019,750.00 

$36,045,750.00 

$19,444,745.00 


Total Real and Personal Property 


4392 


$2,135,040,345.00 


Tax Levy 

Overlay 

Tax Rate per thousand all classes 




$27,584,721.26 

$161,456.79 

$12.92 


2006 1 Residential 

2 Open Space 

3 Commercial 

4 Industrial 

5 Personal Property 


4425 



111 

48 

179 


$2,138,542,555.00 

$0.00 

$54,540,576.00 

$26,113,700.00 

$19,877,280.00 


Total Real and Personal Property 


4763 


$2,239,074,111.00 


Tax Levy 

Overlay 

Tax Rate per thousand all classes 




$28,346,678.24 

$252,732.28 

$12.66 


2007 1 Residential 

2 Open Space 

3 Commercial 

4 Industrial 

5 Personal Property 


4032 



149 

48 

145 


$2,312,714,604.00 

$0.00 

$62,742,696.00 

$25,374,300.00 

$20,201,330.00 


Total Real and Personal Property 


4374 


$2,421,032,930.00 


Tax Levy 

Overlay 

Tax Rate per thousand all classes 




$29,706,074.05 

$177,929.08 

$12.27 



206 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES 

Taxes Receivable as of June 30, 2006 



Fiscal Year 


Real Estate 


Personal Property 


Excise Tax 


2006 


$247,439.19 


$(3,832.36) 


$100,300.89 


2005 


(2,596.37) 


2,105.63 


29,067.40 


2004 


( 601.24) 





13,089.39 


2003 


(3,678.58) 








2002 


2,487.72 









Tax Title 94,476.16 



Respectfully submitted, 

Georgia K. Colivas, 
Treasurer/Collector 



207 



TOWN TREASURER 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

Statement of Cash 

Receipts Fiscal Year 2006 
Including investment returns *$72,580,084.99 

Disbursements Fiscal Year 2006 
Including reinvestments **$77,387,218.10 

Cash Balance on June 30, 2006 $9,551,182.26 

General Fund 

*$20,133,667 from MSBA incl. **$19,285,000 BAN payoff included 

Statement of Investments 

Pooled Investment Fund 

Investments with MMDT June 30, $1,993,425.92 

2006 

Total Cash, Savings and Investments June 30, 2006 $ 1 1 ,544,608. 1 8 
General Fund 

Statement of Interest Received on Savings/Investments-General Fund 

General Fund $331,642.42 

Pooled Investment Fund $86,623.62 

Total Interest Received in Fiscal 2006 $418,266.04 



Outstanding Debt Accounts June 30, 2006 

Debt Exclusion: 

Town Land Acquisition 356,000 

Sewers 10,295,309 

School Construction 3,605,000 

Library Renovation 1 , 1 68,800 

School Roofs 270,000 

Additional School Roofs 465,500 

HS/Middle School/Memorial Construction 30,650,000 



208 



Non-Exclusion: 

Town Hall Renovation $1,332,500 

Cap Landfill 511,400 

Athletic Facilities 83,700 

School Adm. Remodel 1 5,000 

Land Acquisitions 2,197,600 

Health Septic Loans (MWPAT) 57,954 



Enterprise Fund: 

Well No. 6 848,200 

Water Treatment Plant 26 1 ,800 

Causeway Water Main 640,000 

WWTP Improvements 1 ,840,000 

Forest St. Water Main 176,460 

Total Long Term Debt (principal only) $54,773,223 

Total Short Term Debt - BAN-principal $ 788,500 
(matured 9-29-06) 



Respectfully Submitted, 



Georgia K. Colivas 
Treasurer/Collector 



209 



TOWN TREASURER 

TRUST AND INVESTMENT ACCOUNTS 

Funds in Custody of the Town Treasurer: 

Retirement/Pension $3,138,384.53 

Conservation 76,229.82 

Stabilization 147,618.97 

Special Unemployment Insurance 229,306.55 

Group Insurance 106,538.68 

Library Trusts 19,373.53 

Granville Dailey- Library 8 1 ,054.89 

Madelyn L. Grant Library Fund 53,250.79 

Cemetery Perpetual Care 680,708.03 

Gloria Lynn Library Scholarship 9,789.3 1 

Municipal Insurance 227,689.67 

Madelyn L. Grant Scholarship 121,353.83 

Council on Aging 2,016.25 

Palumbo Sports Fund 54.61 

Stabilization- Advanced Sewer Bet. Payments 1,406,985.50 

Moses Ellis Post #117 G.A.R. 9,972.08 

Medfield Antiquities Trust 5,338.83 

Tri-Centennial Trust 2,735.18 

School Essay Fund 3,618.05 

Allendale Sewer Pumping Station Fund 56,549.65 

Dela Park Acres Trust 14,603.87 

Cedarview Acres 14,667.03 

Carruth Sewer District 5,503.86 

Maude Washburn Trust Fund 3,573.33 

Playground Trust 1,352.10 

Elderly & Disabled Trust 4,396.53 

375 th Anniversary Trust 1,062.17 



Balance June 30, 2006 6,423,729.64 

Respectfully submitted, Georgia K. Colivas, CCMT, Treasurer/Collector 

210 







Town of Medfield 










Fund 30 ■ 


■ Town Grants 










Fiscal Year 2006 






Account 










Balance 


Number 


Account Title 

S-Police Drug Education 








6/30/2006 


30-006 


$ 


764.70 


30-013 


S-Dep Compost Bin 






$ 


1,963.70 


30-020 


S-Title V Public Info. Gr. 






$ 


3,016.39 


30-024 


S-State Aid to Library 






$ 


43,052.92 


30-029 


S-DEP Recycling Grant 






$ 


11,321.13 


30-034 


S- Water Pollutn Abat-Tit V 






$ 


66,770.84 


30-042 


S-Medfield Arts Council Int. 


Bearing 




$ 


4,028.27 


30-070 


S-Senior Formula Grant FY05-FY09 




$ 


1.00 


30-074 


S-MAHB Grant 






$ 


275.08 


30-077 


S-Community Policing FY05 






$ 


220.55 


30-078 


F-Fire H.S. Local Prep 






$ 


(5,850.00) Expenditure driven grant 


30-079 


F-DPW H.S. Local Prep 






$ 


(6, 1 50.00) Expenditure driven grant 


30-080 


S-Community Policing FY06 






$ 


9,605.84 




Total 






$ 


129,020.42 




Total Federal Grants (F) 






$ 


(12,000.00) Srec'd 11/3/06 




Total State Grants (S) 






$ 


141,020.42 




Total Private Grants (P) 






$ 


- 




Total 






$ 


129,020.42 



211 





Town of Medfield 






Fund 31 - 


Revolving 






Fiscal Year 2006 




Account 






Balance 


Number 


Account Title 


< 


3/30/2006 


31-001 


Sale of Cemetery Lots 


$ 


123,770.00 


31-002 


Cemetery Perpetual Care 


$ 


47,565.00 


31-003 


Insurance Reimb <$20,000 


$ 


6,692.16 


31-004 


Park & Recreation Revolving 


$ 


3,314.81 , 


31-005 


Tennis Revolving 


$ 


9,280.22 


31-006 


Swim Pond revolving 


$ 


3,570.20 


31-007 


Fire Alarm Revolving 


$ 


10,035.57 


31-010 


Premium on Sale of Bonds 


$ 


106,406.97 


31-012 


Fire CPR Revolving 


$ 


1,066.53 


31-013 


Georgetown Roadwork 


$ 


3,000.00 


31-017 


Special Investigation Police 


$ 


1,073.50 


31-022 


Police Special Detail 


$ 


50,843.71 


31-024 


Conservation Fees 


$ 


9,657.75 


31-033 


Town Hall Renv Bonding Company 


$ 


21,094.69 


31-036 


Fire Arms Revolving 


$ 


11,145.10 


31-042 


Amb Mileage Rev-Billing Agency 


$ 


81,555.25 


31-043 


Adv Life Support Fees-Billing Ag 


$ 


9,397.55 


31-048 


Deputy Coll Fees Ac 


$ 


188.83 


31-050 


Sew Install Engineering Study 


$ 


800.00 


31-051 


Community Gardens 


$ 


720.00 




Total 


$ 


501,177.84 



encumb summer payrl 22,706.28 



212 





TownofMedfield 








Fund 32 - Gifts 








Fiscal Year 2006 






Account 






Balance 


Number 


Account Title 




6/30/2006 


32-001 


Cable Access Gift 


$ 


100.00 


32-002 


Fire Gift 


$ 


2,201.39 


32-003 


Dwight Derby House Gift 


$ 


1,000.00 


32-004 


Civil Defense gift 


$ 


3,817.42 


32-006 


Copeland Gift Police 


$ 


7,688.99 


32-007 


School/Police Safety Gift 


$ 


164.20 


32-008 


Council on Aging Gift 


$ 


16,540.88 


32-011 


Pondview Sidewalk gift 


$ 


193.87 


32-013 


Drug Wages Norwood Gift 


$ 


742.46 


32-014 


Historical Commission Gift 


$ 


34.00 


32-015 


Long Range Planning Gift 


$ 


447.00 


32-016 


Comm to Study Memorials Gift 


$ 


9,230.36 


32-018 


Memorial Day Gift 


$ 


2,045.94 


32-020 


Outreach Gift 


$ 


3,664.43 


32-022 


Park & Recreation Gift 


$ 


1,698.68 


32-025 


Town Meeting Gift 


$ 


75.00 


32-027 


Ambulance Gift 


$ 


2,277.51 


32-028 


Library Gift 


$ 


24,205.50 


32-030 


Grist Mill Gift 


$ 


18,052.16 


32-031 


Town Common Gift 


$ 


2,531.06 


32-034 


Library Building Gift 


$ 


23,059.01 


32-035 


Dare Police Donations 


$ 


4,370.76 


32-038 


COA TRIAD Gift 


$ 


5,134.47 


32-039 


Library Book/Materials Gift 


$ 


17,699.82 


32-040 


Mc Carthy Field Gift Fund 


$ 


242.42 


32-041 


Kennel Operations Gift 


$ 


2,756.01 


32-042 


COA-Senior Van Gift ac 


$ 


187.23 


32-043 


Arts/Cult Council Gift-Est 3/02 


$ 


679.00 


32-044 


Entering Medfield Sign Gift ac 


$ 


2,000.00 


32-046 


COA MACC Furn/Equi/ Access Gift 


$ 


13,271.45 


32-047 


Downtown Study Gift 


$ 


1,704.93 


32-048 


Fiberoptic Gift 


$ 


155,104.49 




Total Town 


$ 


322,920.44 




School 






32-005 


School Gifts-Fd30 


$ 


16,671.74 




Total School 


$ 


16,671.74 




Grand Total 


$ 


339,592.18 



213 



TownofMedfield 

Fund 33 -Chapter 90 

Fiscal Year 2006 



Account 






Number 


Account Title 




33-009 


SStfrRRtrktort27 $250k 
Total 










Reimb it?9'd 






Sept'06 


99,066.66 




Nov'06 


49,440.12 






148,506.78 



Balance 
6/30/2006 



$ (148,506.78) Expenditure 

$ (148,506.78) 



214 



TownofMedfield 

Fund 69 - Health Ins Internal Svc Fund 

Fiscal Year 2006 



Account 

Number Account Title 



69-00 1 Harv/Pilg HMO Self Insured 

69-002 Harv/Pilg Med Enh 65 Self Insured 

69- 1 08000 Deposit Held by Harv/Pilg 

Less Claims Payable @ 6/30/06 

Fund Balance/Funds avail for Health Ins claims 





6/30/2006 


$ 


586,823.43 


$ 


225,557.82 


$ 


103,609.21 


$ 


915,990.46 


$ 


(563,093.92) 


$ 


352,896.54 



215 





Town of Medfield 








Fund 80 - Trust Funds 








Fiscal Year 2006 






Account 




] 


?und Equity 


Number 


Account Title 




6/30/2006 


80-001 


Cemetery Perpetual Care-Non Expendable 


$ 


657,258.00 


80-101 


Cem Perp Care Tr Interest Expendable 


$ 


23,450.03 


80-002 


Unemployment Comp Trust 


$ 


229,306.55 


80-003 


Conservation Trust Fund 


$ 


76,229.82 


80-004 


Library Trust Fund-Non Expendable 


$ 


11,657.46 


80-104 


Library Trust Interest Expendable 


$ 


7,716.07 


80-005 


Pension Trust Fund 


$ 


3,138,384.53 


80-006 


Stabilization Trust Fund 


$ 


302,618.97 less:art24/04$155k 


80-007 


Health Claim Group Ins Trust 


$ 


106,538.68 


80-008 


Municipal Building Ins Trust 


$ 


227,689.67 


80-009 


Palumbo Trust Fund 


$ 


54.61 


80-010 


Gloria Gillis Lynn Trust 


$ 


9,789.31 


80-011 


Council On Aging Trust 


$ 


2,016.25 


80-013 


Allendale Sewer Trust 


$ 


56,549.65 


80-014 


Dela Park Acres 


$ 


14,603.87 


80-015 


Carruth Sewer/Southern Acres Trust 


$ 


5,503.86 


80-016 


Cedarview Acres Trust 


$ 


14,667.03 


80-018 


Granville Daily Trust-Non Expendable 


$ 


68,942.33 


80-118 


Granville Daily Trust- Interest Expendable 


$ 


12,112.56 


80-019 


Essay Trust Fund 


$ 


3,618.05 


80-020 


Tri-Centennial Trust Fund 


$ 


2,735.18 


80-021 


Antiquities Trust 


$ 


5,338.83 


80-022 


Mad Grant Scholar Trust 


$ 


121,353.83 


80-023 


Moses Ellis Gar Trust 


$ 


9,972.08 


80-024 


M. Washburn Trust 


$ 


3,575.33 


80-025 


Playground Trust-Park & Rec 


$ 


1,352.10 


80-026 


Madelyn Grant Library Tr-Non Expendable 


$ 


35,682.84 


80-126 


Madelyn Grant Library Tr Int-Expendable 


$ 


17,567.95 


80-027 


Elderly & Disabled Trust Fd 


$ 


4,396.53 


80-028 


375 Anniversary Trust 


$ 


1,062.17 


80-030 


Sew Bett Stab Trust 


$ 


1,406,985.50 less:artl5/06$300k 




Fund Equity /Retained Earnings @ 6/30 


$ 


6,578,729.64 



Respectfully submitted, 

Joy A. Ricciuto, CGA 
Town Accountant 



216 



WATER ENTERPRISE FUND 

FISCAL YEAR 2006 

ESTIMATED REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES 

WATER ENTERPRISE REVENUES & AVAILABLE FUNDS: 

USER CHARGES $ 1,170,945 



TOTAL WATER REVENUES $ 1,170,945 

TOTAL COSTS APPROPRIATED IN THE WATER DEPARTMENT 
ORGANIZATION CODE 60-410-1 AND 60-410-2: 

PERSONNEL $ 254,687 

OPERATIONS $ 410,050 

RESERVE FUND PROJECTS: 

NEW METERS $ 40,000 

SUB-TOTAL WATER DEPARTMENT COSTS $ 704,737 

ALLOCATED EXPENSES APPROPRIATED IN OTHER 
DEPARTMENTAL BUDGETS: 
DEBT SERVICE: 

PRINCIPAL 01-710-2 $ 156,764 

INTEREST 01-751-2 $ 96,767 

TOTAL DEBT SERVICE $ 253,531 

INSURANCE 

CNTY RETIREMENT CONTRIBUTION 

SHARED EMPLOYEES 

SHARED FACILITIES 

SUB-TOTAL ALLOCATED EXPENSES $ 212,677 



$ 


34,676 


$ 


41,059 


$ 


130,396 


$ 


6,546 



TOTAL-ALLOCATED EXPENSES $ 466,208 



ESTIMATED EXPENSES (1,170,945) 

ESTIMATED WATER FUND SURPLUS (DEFICIT) $ 



CALCULATION OF GENERAL FUND SUBSIDY : 
ENTERPRISE FUND REVENUES AND AVAILABLE FUNDS 
LESS: TOTAL COSTS 
LESS: PRIOR YEAR DEFICIT 

GENERAL FUND SUBSIDY 

SOURCES OF FUNDING FOR COSTS APPROPRIATED IN ENTERPRISE FUND : 

ENTERPRISE FUND REVENUES AND AVAILABLE FUNDS 

TAXATION 

FREE CASH 

NON-ENTERPRISE AVAILABLE FUNDS 

TOTAL SOURCES OF FUNDING FOR COSTS 
APPROPRIATED IN THE WATER ENTERPRISE FUND 



FY06 WATER ENTERPRISE RATE STRUCTURE: 



$ 

$ 
$ 


1,170,945 
(1,170,945) 


$ 




$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 


1,170,945 


$ 


1,170,945 



0-10,000 

10,001 -35,000 

35,001 - 70,000 

OVER 70,000 GALLONS 



$25.36 BASE CHARGE EVERY 6 MONTHS 
$2.20 PER THOUSAND GALLONS 
$3.36 PER THOUSAND GALLONS 
$4.72 PER THOUSAND GALLONS 



217 



SEWER ENTERPRISE FUND 

FISCAL YEAR 2006 

ESTIMATED REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES 



SEWER ENTERPRISE REVENUES & AVAILABLE FUNDS: 
USER CHARGES 
TOTAL SEWER REVENUES 



$ 1,121,438 



1,121,438 



TOTAL COSTS APPROPRIATED IN THE SEWER DEPARTMENT 

ORGANIZATION CODE 61-420-1 AND 61-420-2: 

PERSONNEL $ 179,920 

OPERATIONS $ 464,550 

RESERVE FUND PROJECTS: 

- INFILTRATION INFLOW $ 40,000 

- NEW METERS $ 40,000 



SUB-TOTAL SEWER DEPARTMENT COSTS 



724,470 



ALLOCATED EXPENSES APPROPRIATED IN OTHER 
DEPARTMENTAL BUDGETS: 
DEBT SERVICE: 

PRINCIPAL 01-710-2 $ 115,000 

INTEREST 01-751-2 $ 88,292 

TOTAL DEBT SERVICE 



203,292 



$ 21,671 

$ 35,703 

$ 131,747 

$ 4,555 



193,676 



INSURANCE 

CNTY RETIREMENT CONTRIBUTION 

SHARED EMPLOYEES 

SHARED FACILITIES 

SUB-TOTAL ALLOCATED EXPENSES 

TOTAL-ALLOCATED EXPENSES 

ESTIMATED EXPENSES 

ESTIMATED SEWER FUND SURPLUS (DEFICIT) 



CALCULATION OF GENERAL FUND SUBSIDY : 
ENTERPRISE FUND REVENUES AND AVAILABLE FUNDS 
LESS: TOTAL COSTS 
LESS: PRIOR YEAR DEFICIT 

GENERAL FUND SUBSIDY 

SOURCES OF FUNDING FOR COSTS APPROPRIATED IN ENTERPRISE FUND : 

ENTERPRISE FUND REVENUES AND AVAILABLE FUNDS 

TAXATION 

FREE CASH 

NON-ENTERPRISE AVAILABLE FUNDS 

TOTAL SOURCES OF FUNDING FOR COSTS 
APPROPRIATED IN THE SEWER ENTERPRISE FUND 



396,968 



$ 


(1,121,438) 


$ 


. 


$ 
$ 
$ 


1,121,438 
(1,121,438) 


$ 


. 


$ 
$ 
$ 

$ 


1,121,438 


$ 


1,121,438 



FY06 SEWER ENTERPRISE RATE STRUCTURE: 

RESIDENTIAL BASED ON 75% OF WATER CONSUMPTION 



0-10,000 

10,001 AND OVER 

COMMERCIAL 



0-10,000 

10,001 AND OVER 

SEPTIC DISPOSAL FEE 



$65.60 EVERY 6 MONTHS 
$6.60 PER THOUSAND GALLONS 
BASED ON 100% OF WATER CONSUMPTION 



$65.60 EVERY 6 MONTHS 
$6.60 PER THOUSAND GALLONS 
$11 0.00/1,000 GAL 



218 



WATER & SEWER ENTERPRISE FUND 
ESTABLISHED JULY 1, 1991 (FISCAL YEAR 1992) 
UNDER MASS GENERAL LAWS, CH 40/SECTION 39K 

FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2006 

WATER 



Total Services 
Added Services 
Thousand Gallons Pumped 
Thousand Gallons Sold 

Water Retained Earnings - Reserved 
Water Retained Earnings - Unreserved 





3.852 

10 

450.240.900 

373.078.000 


$ 
$ 


1.067,305 
297,317 certified 



SEWER 



Total Services 
Added Services 



2349 
26 



Sewer Retained Earnings - Reserved 
Sewer Retained Earnings - Unreserved 



73,257 
458,715 



certified 



219 



PERPETUAL CARE 



Karl Whelan 


$ 


1,100.00 


Brenda Elliot 


$ 


1,100.00 


Kathleen Led better 


$ 


2,200.00 


Mary P. Luciano 


$ 


1,100.00 


William & Dorothy Small 


$ 


1,100.00 


Richard Drahos 


$ 


1,100.00 


M. Pamela Gallo 


$ 


2,200.00 


Joseph Lavita 


$ 


2,200.00 


Michael McGowan 


$ 


1,100.00 


Robert Beksha & Nancy Dearness 


$ 


3,300.00 


John T. Downing & Mary Downing 


$ 


2,200.00 


Leland & Joan Berg 


$ 


2,200.00 


Janet Krueger 


$ 


550.00 


Ann W. McDonald 


$ 


1,100.00 


Sharon L Norgaard 


$ 


1,100.00 


Eric M. Perkins 


$ 


2.200.00 


Allen M. Bowles 


$ 


1,000.00 


Roger Laakso 


$ 


2,200.00 


Joseph LaVita 


$ 


1,100.00 


Judith B. Brady 


$ 


550.00 


Martha O'Connell 


$ 


2,200.00 


Jean Dunn 


$ 


2,200.00 


Diane M. Brienze 


$ 


2,200.00 



TOTAL $ 37,300.00 



220 



INDEX 



Elected Town Officers 6 

Appointments By 

Fire Chief 13 

Health, Board of 13 

Moderator 13 

Planning Board 13 

School Committee 13 

Selectmen, Board of 6 

Treasurer/Collector 13 

Warrant Committee 1 3 

Town Department Reports 15 

Aging, Council on 65 

Animal Control Officer/Inspector 30 

Appeals on Zoning, Board of 24 

Assessors, Board of 25 

Conservation Commission 41 

Fire Department 32 

Health, Board of 57 

Historical Commission 43 

Historic District Commission 46 

Housing Authority 63 

Inspection Department 36 

Library Trustees 52 

Medfield Emergency Management Agency 29 

Memorial Day Address 55 

Memorial Public Library 50 

Memorials, Committee to Study 53 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 71 

Norfolk County Commissioners 70 

Park and Recreation Commission 67 

Planning Board 22 

Police Department 27 

Public Works Department 1 8 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 40 

Selectmen, Board of 16 

Town Clock, Keepers of 49 

Tri County Regional Vocational Technical School 77 

Tree Warden and Insect Pest Control 69 



Veteran's Services Officer 54 

Water and Sewerage Board 21 

School Department Reports 84 

School Committee 85 

Superintendent of Schools 88 

Staff Directory 90 

Director of Finance and Operations 1 09 

Amos Clark Kingsbury High School 112 

Graduation Exercises, High School 116 

Thomas A. Blake Middle School 127 

Dale Street School 132 

Ralph Wheelock School 1 36 

Memorial School 139 

Pupil Services Department 142 

Athletic Director 145 

Community Education Program 152 

Town Clerk's Records 154 

Births 155 

Marriages 157 

Deaths 159 

Town Meetings and Elections 

Annual Town Election, March 27, 2006 161 

Warrant for Annual Town Meeting, April 24, 2006 163 

Special Town Election, June 5, 2006 1 86 

State Primary, September 1 9, 2006 1 89 

State Election, November 7, 2006 197 

Financial Reports 205 

Assessors, Board of 206 

Collector of Taxes 207 

Perpetual Care 220 

Town Accountant 211 

Treasurer 208 

Water and Sewer Enterprise Funds 2 1 7 



MEBFIELD BOARD OF SELECTMEN 




tr————JL 

Lawrence E. Abar 

1968-1972 




R. Edward Beard 
1975-1981 









*r —* 

Austin C. Buchanan 

1959-1968 




Herbert B. Burr 
1955-1958 




Kenneth M. Child** Jr. Richard G. Connors 
1981-1985 1964-1967 




fcf : "" ~:4 

.Richard P. OeSnrgher 

1980-1983 




Arthur J. Farrar 
1973-1976 




1^— — — — — j 

Walter M. Frank 

1967-1970 




Robert B. Fraser 
1941-1943 




John F, Ganie'y 
1990-1993' 




Charles W, Haigh 
1934-1937 1940-1946 




Frank G. Haley 
1927-1954 




John T. Harney 
1994-2000 




Tlda! B. Henry 

1993-1996 " 




Harry A, Kelleher 
1968-1977 



Ik -Jt 

Weston G, Kmii 
1970-1973 




Robert J. Larkkt 
1981-1990 



c 






Joseph L. Mareionette William E, McCarthy 
1947-1964 1971-1975 1946-1955 




I* " "J. 

Sandra G. Mousey 

1977-1980 

r ^..^i 




Harold F. Pritoni, Jr. 
1988-1994 




irt:' ■'-" ■* 

William F. Nourse 

1985-1988 
r. _ . J% 






Clarence A. Purvis 
1996-1999 



m 

Edward R, Ferry 
1963-1966 

r ^ 




k "" —J 

Wiiiiam R. Reagan 
1976-198! 




I* J 

Osier L» Peterson 

2000 to Preseru 
r ^ 




k A 

Paul B. Rhuda 
1999 -Present 




It ~~S 

Joseph A. Roberts 

1954-1963 




fc. "14 

Ann B, Thompson 

.1 983-Prescnt 




Loc